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Sewer Tunnel Train

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Sewer Tunnel Train

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  • #537667

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    stephentszuter said:

    Anyway, I as well thought of what else we could use that tunnel boring machine for. ;(

    think big.

    3c rail on the new permanent magnet maglev trains (https://www.llnl.gov/str/Post.html?pagewanted=all) in evacuated tunnels to eliminate air friction at high speeds. The ultimate in energy efficiency and speed.

    columbus to cleveland in 30 minutes? hells yeah.

    of course… at one end of the tunnel you can slope it upwards…

    Last October, negotiations were completed on a three-year contract with NASA to build a new Inductrack model at Lawrence Livermore to demonstrate the concept at speeds up to Mach 0.5 (170 meters per second). NASA is interested in maglev technology to help launch rockets at sharply reduced costs.

    because that’s more interesting than going to cleveland anyway

    #537668

    JonMyers
    Participant

    It’s getting harder and harder for me to see the case for trains in most US metros. Especially given the dire economic circumstances of most cities and states.

    I love and appreciate the NYC subway and transit system, but truthfully, I rarely use it. I find the process of hiking to the train (3 blocks away), waiting for the train, and dealing with the crowds to be annoying and time consuming. Listening to your headphones, and reading on the train isn’t as glamorous as it sounds.

    Always have felt that way. It’s too slow.

    I mostly just walk (preferred method of transportation) or if it’s late and cold, and I’m impatient I take a taxi. For longer hauls, if I’m headed to Brooklyn or Queens then of course I’ll take the train. For bouncing around Manhattan it’s annoying, imo.

    In general, I find public transit for short hauls to be slow and annoying. Most people I know feel that way.

    Even with trains, and even with a transit system as round the clock and efficient as New York’s. It feels clunky after having been in other cities that on the surface look like chaos, but are in truth more efficient in my opinion.

    While not climate appropriate 365 for all cities, the mode and method of transport I’ve found to be the most efficient is motorbikes/ scooters.

    When living in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam last year, the biggest impression the city, if not the country left on me was the motorbike culture. With the army of two-stroke engines belching out exhaust, it’s certainly not the most environmentally friendly solution (could be), but it is hands down the most transportation efficient city I’ve ever lived in.

    Odd for a city of 8 million people that on the surface looks like total chaos. It just works.

    I never saw one accident the whole time I logged 7,000 miles on the roads there.

    Having a motorbike waiting for you at the bottom of your apartment, hopping on it, zipping to your destination, and pulling up on the sidewalk in front of your destination is hyper efficient.

    Aside from business, the efficiency of the city is a significant factor as to why I’m moving back there next month for a while. I love the efficiency of getting around. There’s nothing like it and nothing compares. Trains certainly don’t compare.

    Ironically, here in New York I have started seeing tons of motorbikes parked everywhere in the last two years. The problem is you can just park them everywhere, and there is no system in place for that per se.

    In Columbus, motorbike culture got a boost with the designated motorbike parking, and that opportunity was fumbled over the goofy pricing scheme that was rushed out for the sticker, a tacky revenue grab, along with the heavy handed parking enforcement. It was confusing, too soon and ultimately a deterrent because not enough time was given for the culture to evolve and be appreciated. Thus, it’s a tiny niche. That’s a shame.

    To me, encouraging motorbike transportation, and better accommodating it seems like an easy win, and is way less capital intensive versus the constant pipe dream of trains that will probably never happen.

    I’m not saying it’s a realistic solution for every city, every where, but it’s probably a lot more realistic than hundreds of millions, if not billions of public money dedicated to financing trains. That’s a hard sell in a bankrupt, divided, car-centric country that still hasn’t came to terms with the financial limitations of its wants.

    #537669
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    JonMyers said:
    the constant pipe dream of trains that will probably never happen.

    #537670

    JonMyers
    Participant

    @Rus – yikes, I really did say that. I’m in trouble now. :)

    #537671
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    JonMyers said:

    @Rus
    – yikes, I really did say that. I’m in trouble now. :)

    It was that or this one:

    Really though you make a good point.

    #537672

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    In the States though, motorcycling developed an image problem because of the movie “The Wild One” all the way back in the ’50s. The movie’s premise was flawed as compared to the actual events of the incident, but it didn’t matter. It took a lot of work to shake that image somewhat but motorcyclists are still seen as hellions with a death wish. In other countries it’s considered just another way to get around. There’s a lot of resistance to being seen as a “motorcycle person”.

    #537673

    JonMyers
    Participant

    GCrites80s said:
    In the States though, motorcycling developed an image problem because of the movie “The Wild One” all the way back in the ’50s. The movie’s premise was flawed as compared to the actual events of the incident, but it didn’t matter. It took a lot of work to shake that image somewhat but motorcyclists are still seen as hellions with a death wish. In other countries it’s considered just another way to get around. There’s a lot of resistance to being seen as a “motorcycle person”.

    True, motorcycling used to have an image problem. I’d argue that is more or less no longer the case.

    Especially when you have the weekend warriors ponying up a fortune in an attempt to recreate that bad boy image. It’s more comedy than threatening at this point.

    Regardless though, motorbike/ scooter culture is quite different.

    #537674
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    GCrites80s said:
    In the States though, motorcycling developed an image problem because of the movie “The Wild One” all the way back in the ’50s. The movie’s premise was flawed as compared to the actual events of the incident, but it didn’t matter. It took a lot of work to shake that image somewhat but motorcyclists are still seen as hellions with a death wish. In other countries it’s considered just another way to get around. There’s a lot of resistance to being seen as a “motorcycle person”.

    I would say motorcycle’s real image problem is that it is an expensive hobby for old timers:

    Harley, You’re Not Getting Any Younger

    “The average age of a Harley rider is 49, up from 42 five years ago.”

    #537675
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    Motorcycling’s imagine problem:

    “Oh you ride a motorcycle? My uncle has a Harley too.”

    Ugh.

    #537676

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    spfld_expat said:
    I would say motorcycle’s real image problem is that it is an expensive hobby for old timers:

    Harley, You’re Not Getting Any Younger

    “The average age of a Harley rider is 49, up from 42 five years ago.”

    At the same time, the average age of a motorcycle buyer industry-wide has dropped from 43 to 40, even including the Harley owners. Harley has pretty much decided to stick with its core demographic, (the over 50 set) having shut down their sportier line, Buell. Harleys are so expensive and different (heavier, larger, little focus on maneuverability and handling, torquey but slow) as compared to most other brands of motorcycle that they’re shutting themselves out of the youth market. Little bikes (600cc and under) are what’s hot right now and they’re what the younger riders are into. The kind of riders JonMyers was talking about — urban point and squirt types.

    #537677
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    GCrites80s said:
    urban point and squirt types.

    Still talking about motorcycles?

    #537678

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    Ah, oops, I used motorcycle jargon when I shouldn’t have. That probably does sound pretty funny to the general population.

    #537679
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    GCrites80s said:
    Ah, oops, I used motorcycle jargon when I shouldn’t have. That probably does sound pretty funny to the general population.

    If you mean it sounds like frat night at Axis, yeah.

    #537680

    NerosNeptune
    Participant

    rus said:
    If you mean it sounds like frat night at Axis, yeah.

    lol yeah i’m having a hard time visualizing what point and squirt even means on a motorcycle.

    having ridden a bicycle around town for a few years, i could see myself getting a small bike. I used to think they would be too dangerous, but being on a slow bicycle is probably worse, and it would be nice to keep up with traffic.

    #537681

    GCrites80s
    Participant

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