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Schools as Great as our City!

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Schools as Great as our City!

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  • #548923

    joev
    Participant

    Education is a public right and public responsibility. If this fails, you should be insulted by the charter school industry, which hijacked this whole levy campaign for its own purposes.

    It’s also an unreasonably huge ask for new money at a time the school board’s credibility is at a low. A more modest and charter free levy request would have my full support.

    #548924

    James Ragland
    Participant

    joev said:
    Education is a public right and public responsibility. If this fails, you should be insulted by the charter school industry, which hijacked this whole levy campaign for its own purposes.

    It’s also an unreasonably huge ask for new money at a time the school board’s credibility is at a low. A more modest and charter free levy request would have my full support.

    The “charter school industry” is supported by parents who choose to send their children to the schools. You hear of White Hat, and some of the others that have been deemed undesirable, but there are great charter schools right here in Columbus, and to say that these schools, who produce quality students that you can be proud of, are hijacking anything is not correct. I will not defend a failing school, but there are charters who are failing, and there are CCS schools that are failing. If the problem is with the Board, I hear you. I’ve personally tried to do something about that as well. Voters and the political powers who endorse and print sample ballots chose to go with the Board we have now. Another election is coming up. If you feel the Board has done our city an injustice, let them know it with your vote.

    I want to invite some of you who oppose to come with me to visit a CCS School like Walnut Ridge. Have any of you been there during the academic day? I would also like to have a meet up at a local, high performing charter school as well? Have any of you who oppose the levy ever been inside one of these during the school day?

    I am afraid that the media and other entities who have power have spent so much time debasing charter schools, that prevailing thought is that all of them are bad. This is not the case. Many charters host wonderful families who dream of a good education for their children. The real good ones are run by quality people who do provide the proper level of oversight to the school, and would be the first to leave if the school did not meet the mark both academically, and in the behavior and safety of its students.

    I encourage you to visit some of these places, and I would like to take you to them, if you would allow me. It’s that important. Please consider taking me up on the offer. My kids future depends on it.

    #548925
    Anne Evans
    Anne Evans
    Keymaster

    How can one find out about these excellent charter schools?

    I was doing research last year and found that info hard to come across, unless I just didn’t know where to look.

    #548926

    pez
    Participant

    James Ragland said:
    The “charter school industry” is supported by parents who choose to send their children to the schools.

    Therein lies the problem, some people are only pro-choice prior to birth.

    The charter schools didn’t cause the CCS issues, but they did and will continue to grow because of them.

    #548927

    pez
    Participant

    nm – bad edit

    #548928

    James Ragland
    Participant

    Here is a link to Horizon Science Academy’s website. Please review it. The link for the State Report Card on this school goes to the ODE site that is not up and running until August 22.

    main

    #548929

    James Ragland
    Participant

    Here is a link to Columbus Collegiate Academy. We have recruited several of our students here at Cristo Rey from CCA, and they are talented, driven students with good behavior and a solid academic background.

    http://unitedschoolsnetwork.org/maincampus.php

    #548931

    News
    Participant

    Columbus Levy Campaign Begins With TV Ads Claiming Schools “Failing”
    August 19, 2013
    by Mike Thompson
    WOSU Director of News and Public Affairs

    Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman today launched the school district’s levy campaign by saying, “recently our schools have failed us.” After a scandal-plagued year, which included the departure of the district’s superintendent, school leaders may have no other choice.

    READ MORE: http://wosu.org/2012/news/2013/08/19/columbus-levy-campaign-begins-with-tv-ads-claiming-schools-failing/

    #548932

    James Ragland
    Participant

    pez said:
    Therein lies the problem, some people are only pro-choice prior to birth.

    The charter schools didn’t cause the CCS issues, but the did and will continue to grow because of them.

    I’m not certain that CCS issues will continue to grow BECAUSE of charter schools. You can look at it multiple ways. Charters who have been around for a long time (10 years or more) were initially filled with students from CCS schools where the children were underperforming. If you look at the numbers, Columbus City Schools state test performance started going up as more charter schools came on board. Charters were not initially getting the students from CCS who were making all A’s with perfect attendance and great state test scores. Charters were getting students who had not had success in CCS schools and wanted another option. Families were, and still are desperate for quality education.

    At the same time, levies were passed by the public to upgrade certain facilities in CCS schools, and parents were still leaving. I am of the mindset that it will take all facets of education to solve our problems here. Schools like mine, Cristo Rey Columbus-a Catholic School that focuses on College Prep and Workforce Development are a necessary option, but some parents (like me personally) will continue to find that their neighborhood CCS school is the best option for their child. That’s a good thing. If a local charter does the job better than the local CCS school and the CCS school either closes or changes it’s focus because parents are no longer sending their children there, what’s the problem with that?

    There is no school in this city that is open with ZERO students. Please remember that. Schools exist because parents choose to send their children there. Sure sometimes the schools are not up to par. It is up to the state to mandate performance measures to make certain that if you are not up to par, you either get better quickly or shut down. Now, for me, this should apply not only to charter schools, but to local district schools as well. The standards should be the same across the board. THEN parents can compare apples to apples and schools can compete with each other on equal footing.

    CCS needs to be a leaner district with a higher percentage of high performing schools. If a CCS School stinks, then why is it open? Why do so many of the “CCS Alternative Schools” have long waiting lists? Why can’t the programs that field these waiting lists be duplicated? We can change some of these issues, but cutting resources to the district will have a negative impact. I say vote for the kids, and then let the Board know what you think of them with your vote for or against them. The district is under new leadership. I think Dr. Good is setting himself up to be there long term. He’s cleaned house with some of the higher level administrative positions already, and I think he will continue to do so. There are several candidates on the ballot for School Board this cycle. Reach out to them and get their ideas. If you like what they are saying and you feel they can deliver, then when you get a sample ballot and their name is not on it-VOTE fore them anyway. It CAN be done.

    #548933

    rory
    Participant

    James Ragland said:

    The parents of all children must be attentive enough to help their own kids in the The system is not perfect. You CAN vote out the people who have caused this distress. I am somewhat insulated in that if the levy does not pass, and the cuts are too draconian (which they will be),
    I have the resources to either move or send both of my children to private schools.

    There are a lot of parents who are not attentive. That’s why the school system should work for everyone when the kid walks in the door. Living in a mixed income neighborhood as I do it’s important to me that each and every kid in the neighborhood get a decent education not just the ones with the most crafty parents or the ones who can afford to send their kids to a private school. And I don’t mind paying a little extra in taxes if I don’t have to replace one of my car windows/garden hose/patio furniture every six months. It’s not going to help the development of the urban core to have all these kids left behind while providing better educational options for a chosen few. Not being an education expert I don’t have any answers but there is one thing I would like to see and that is the people on the mayor’s commission, and those who are funding this campaign, to actually run for the school board. Granted, it will truly suck to be on the school board for the next couple years but they don’t call it public service for nothing. The system is obviously broken so it’s time for some of our more connected citizens to step up and see if they can fix for everyone not just a few.

    #548934

    James Ragland
    Participant

    rory said:
    There are a lot of parents who are not attentive. That’s why the school system should work for everyone when the kid walks in the door. Living in a mixed income neighborhood as I do it’s important to me that each and every kid in the neighborhood get a decent education not just the ones with the most crafty parents or the ones who can afford to send their kids to a private school. And I don’t mind paying a little extra in taxes if I don’t have to replace one of my car windows/garden hose/patio furniture every six months. It’s not going to help the development of the urban core to have all these kids left behind while providing better educational options for a chosen few. Not being an education expert I don’t have any answers but there is one thing I would like to see and that is the people on the mayor’s commission, and those who are funding this campaign, to actually run for the school board. Granted, it will truly suck to be on the school board for the next couple years but they don’t call it public service for nothing. The system is obviously broken so it’s time for some of our more connected citizens to step up and see if they can fix for everyone not just a few.

    Rory,
    It is almost impossible to have quality public schools (or any school for that matter0 without parents reinforcing what is taught in the schools. The current public school model is not built to ensure that every student is successful. I am sure you can remember the slacker at your high school. The kid who had quality parents who supported him/her, but still chose to make a loser out of himself. There HAS to be a personal choice involved for the kids themselves.

    Having said that, the environment must be in place to foster that success. We currently have many school systems that cannot support the children who make the right choice to do well in school, and that is a product of the parenting. When I was a child, what the teacher said was the law. I knew it, the teacher knew it, my parents reinforced it. When the teacher called my parents and told them I acted up, I got it. No questions asked. I didn’t have an opinion. Nowadays, teachers can call home and the parents will side with the child. That cuts the authority of the teacher and allows for chaos to ensue at many schools.

    I have spoken to many individuals in Columbus about the prospect of a Boarding School for young men so that we can begin to overcome some of the issues our boys in particular are facing. The concept is a sound one, however funding it would be a problem.

    You’ve asked for those on the Mayor’s Commission to run for the school board. That would be nice. I’m interested in knowing how many of the people on the Commission would be eligible to run. How many of the Commissioners have students who attend Columbus City Schools? How many of the Commissioners actually live within district boundaries? If you dig deeper there, the results may surprise you.

    #548935
    Jason Powell
    Jason Powell
    Participant

    It’s a planning issue. Neighborhoods left in neglect will attract a greater number of parents who give two sh!ts about their children’s education. Neighborhoods that invest will attract a greater number of families who do care about their children’s education. Why do you think most of the worst schools in the city are located near some of the poorest neighborhoods in the city. Throwing all the money in the world at a failing school in a poor neighborhood is never going to change the outlook of those neglectful parents. Children of said parents will grow up unmotivated with mixed messages on how a good education will most likely lead to a better life. They won’t get that message because the parents didn’t get that message, and so on and so on. Fix the neighborhoods, diversify the socioeconomic makeup of families and schools will get better as a result. (Note: I am not suggesting the displacement of lower income residents but rather more accountability, kind of a “rubbing off effect” brought on by higher income (and lower income) parents who care) It’s a huge part of the issue that nobody seems to take into account because it “may offend someone”. Offend someone?!

    It seems like “poaching” to me as well. But, to be fair, I have limited knowledge on the situation. It’s a mixed bag of problems; unqualified teachers, bad management, outdated/overcrowded school facilities, the list goes on. It is something I’m interested in so I will do my due diligence before casting my vote.

    #548936
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    This is an interesting topic to me although full disclosure, I dont have my kids in Columbus public. I personally believe that parents and neighborhood/safety/volunteerism constitute 90% of school success. Not staff, money, etc. Grandview is great because a huge majority of parents volunteer and donate for every single little thing. There were parent volunteers taking groups of kids(three or four kids) for individual focused learning every single day of every single class in elementary school allowing the teacher to work with small groups every single day. Contrast with the times I volunteered at Windsor with its 90% kid turnover rate.

    Columbus schools seem to be completely crooked to me. And I am from Youngstown. It takes alot to impress me with crookedness, and I worked for a mafia guy in high school and he would blush to see how Columbus Public games the system. A large infusion of cash seems like it would be going anywhere but the kids. The administration of Columbus schools needs gutted. Every teacher is working their asses off. I have multiple family members teaching in CBus public. No parents even show up for parent teacher conferences. It aint a money problem, it is a people problem.
    Who reasonably believes that a levy would go to the kids in this district of con people?

    Who in this discussion actually spends time in a classroom in CBus public? I dont have any kids in CBus public, but in my volunteer time, one thing I have seen is that this is not a problem caused by a shortage of money, nor a shortage of front line people trying to solve the problem. I saw teachers at Windsor rowing upstream and getting poor student performances that if they were teaching in Grandview would be getting Awards of Excellence.

    #548937
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    Anne said:
    How can one find out about these excellent charter schools?

    I was doing research last year and found that info hard to come across, unless I just didn’t know where to look.

    This is a link to a page I created back when I was working for the Columbus Urban League. It’s based on info from the ODE website, but that is difficult or impossible to access directly through their –frankly terrible –web gateway. However, the info was last updated in 2011, and several schools have opened/closed or changed their rankings since then.

    If I get a chance I’ll try to scrape the new data when it is released.

    http://charter.kitoba.com

    #548939
    Anne Evans
    Anne Evans
    Keymaster

    Thanks Chris.

    I’ve spent a little time at my son’s school. And we attend the parent teacher conferences. I’ll say that it is sad when you look at the BookIT reading chart and by the last nine weeks, many kids only had 2 or less stars (out of 8 or 9). That’s a home issue.

    We were still happy with his first year at Fifth Ave and will continue to see how it goes.

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