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Save Ohio History!

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  • #278790

    Brant Jones wrote >>
    Between the Ohio Libraries, Ohio History, and the Davis, there’s an awful lot of saving to do these days.

    That because those parts of the cultural industry have failed for years to see the writing on the wall and relied on the public teat. Energy and thought that should have been spent on coming up with alternative models has consistently been used on lobbying and hand-wringing.

    A.

    #278791
    Jeff Regensburger
    Jeff Regensburger
    Participant

    Andrew Hall wrote >>

    Brant Jones wrote >>
    Between the Ohio Libraries, Ohio History, and the Davis, there’s an awful lot of saving to do these days.

    That because those parts of the cultural industry have failed for years to see the writing on the wall and relied on the public teat. Energy and thought that should have been spent on coming up with alternative models has consistently been used on lobbying and hand-wringing.
    A.

    What writing on the wall should these agencies have seen? As I understand the State’s current budget crisis, it has its roots in the global banking/housing/stock market meltdown. Why would I expect OHS, libraries, and arts centers to be prepared for such an economic crisis when it’s clear no one else was?

    #278792

    jeff_r wrote >>

    Andrew Hall wrote >>

    Brant Jones wrote >>
    Between the Ohio Libraries, Ohio History, and the Davis, there’s an awful lot of saving to do these days.

    That because those parts of the cultural industry have failed for years to see the writing on the wall and relied on the public teat. Energy and thought that should have been spent on coming up with alternative models has consistently been used on lobbying and hand-wringing.
    A.

    What writing on the wall should these agencies have seen? As I understand the State’s current budget crisis, it has its roots in the global banking/housing/stock market meltdown. Why would I expect OHS, libraries, and arts centers to be prepared for such an economic crisis when it’s clear no one else was?

    Economics are always cyclical and Ohio was lagging anyway, well before this big crunch. The culture biz should have been making contingency plans well before.

    Furthermore, the political winds have been obvious for some time. Too many cultural operations have an entitlement mentality which blinded them to this.

    A.

    #278793
    Jeff Regensburger
    Jeff Regensburger
    Participant

    Andrew Hall wrote >>

    jeff_r wrote >>

    Andrew Hall wrote >>

    Brant Jones wrote >>
    Between the Ohio Libraries, Ohio History, and the Davis, there’s an awful lot of saving to do these days.

    That because those parts of the cultural industry have failed for years to see the writing on the wall and relied on the public teat. Energy and thought that should have been spent on coming up with alternative models has consistently been used on lobbying and hand-wringing.
    A.

    What writing on the wall should these agencies have seen? As I understand the State’s current budget crisis, it has its roots in the global banking/housing/stock market meltdown. Why would I expect OHS, libraries, and arts centers to be prepared for such an economic crisis when it’s clear no one else was?

    Economics are always cyclical and Ohio was lagging anyway, well before this big crunch. The culture biz should have been making contingency plans well before.
    Furthermore, the political winds have been obvious for some time. Too many cultural operations have an entitlement mentality which blinded them to this.
    A.

    So basically you’re saying they should have seen this coming, they should have planned better, and they didn’t really earn what they’ve got anyway. Is that about right?

    #278794

    jeff_r wrote >>

    Andrew Hall wrote >>

    jeff_r wrote >>

    Andrew Hall wrote >>

    Brant Jones wrote >>
    Between the Ohio Libraries, Ohio History, and the Davis, there’s an awful lot of saving to do these days.

    That because those parts of the cultural industry have failed for years to see the writing on the wall and relied on the public teat. Energy and thought that should have been spent on coming up with alternative models has consistently been used on lobbying and hand-wringing.
    A.

    What writing on the wall should these agencies have seen? As I understand the State’s current budget crisis, it has its roots in the global banking/housing/stock market meltdown. Why would I expect OHS, libraries, and arts centers to be prepared for such an economic crisis when it’s clear no one else was?

    Economics are always cyclical and Ohio was lagging anyway, well before this big crunch. The culture biz should have been making contingency plans well before.
    Furthermore, the political winds have been obvious for some time. Too many cultural operations have an entitlement mentality which blinded them to this.
    A.

    So basically you’re saying they should have seen this coming, they should have planned better, and they didn’t really earn what they’ve got anyway. Is that about right?

    Mostly. The “earn” part doesn’t make any sense to me though – I am not making a moral judgement.

    Like I said in CSO discussions, too much of the “high” culture industry has failed to appreciate that there is a far more sophisticated audiences out there who have access to far more choices. Just telling them that they are ‘supposed’ to appreciate these things doesn’t cut it. Instead of working on marketing to their audience, they relied on the idea that they “ought” to have this money by some moral imperative.

    I travel a lot and I visit a lot of historical sites, to make this more specific to the thread. I am fascinated by how as I get older, I get increasingly appalled by what I see. Boring. Passionless. Lifeless. A total “Appreciate This! (you moron, if you don’t)” vibe. I totally get why my son is bored out of his mind, especially when contrasted with the places that ‘get it.’ A battlefield is … a fucking field. Unless you do something that is value-added.

    In the same vein, look at how almost out-of-control sucessful something like Agora is versus the places that grovel for the dole.

    A.

    #278795
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Andrew Hall wrote >>

    Like I said in CSO discussions, too much of the “high” culture industry has failed to appreciate that there is a far more sophisticated audiences out there who have access to far more choices. Just telling them that they are ‘supposed’ to appreciate these things doesn’t cut it. Instead of working on marketing to their audience, they relied on the idea that they “ought” to have this money by some moral imperative.

    Hear, hear.

    #278796

    joev
    Participant

    There are a few OHS sites that do really well with detailed interpretation, like Fort Meigs and it’s excellent museum in Perrysburg. And others that largely let the site tell its own story without a surfeit of hokey details, like Serpent Mound.

    But I agree, there are a lot of sites that are just atrocious, and while someone obviously cares a great deal about them, they feel more like the moldy, shut up time-capsule houses of long dead relatives. This is the bottleneck you come to, I’m afraid, when volunteers are needed to take over the reins of care too much. Rather than getting an experience that you will enjoy and learn from, you get an experience that an untrained, though passionate, volunteer thinks you will enjoy and learn from. Usually in 1978.

    Edit: If I see a rope-mattress bed one more time…

    #278797
    Jeff Regensburger
    Jeff Regensburger
    Participant

    @Andrew Hall

    I picked “earn” because I wasn’t sure how else to paraphrase what you might mean by “entitlement mentality” (Speaking of, are you aware there’s more than a couple loaded/negative phrases in your posts? I’m thinking of things like “public teat”, “grovel for the dole”, “entitlement mentality”, “hand-wringing”, and the like. I’m guessing you’re cognizant of the effect, but in the event you’re not I’ll point out that it comes off as a little bit uncivil…at least to me anyway).

    Beyond that, having not been aware of your stance on the “high” culture industry (I don’t recall reading the CSO thread), I’ll count myself as informed now.

    As to what the Historical Society might or might not do to make history more relevant, it appears almost as though we’re somehow looking at two different organizations; you see pedantic and boring, I see educational and engaging.

    I look at initiatives like Fort Meigs and see a vibrant, interactive, and popular interpretation of history.

    I hear about kids participating in the History Day competition and see a whole new generation being brought up to explore, study and interpret history for themselves.

    I look at the Ohio Historical Marker Program and see communities working to bring a sense of history and place to their homes, streets, and neighborhoods.

    I look at the Muffins Baseball Team, the Norman Rockwell Event, the exhibit of Pulitzer Prize photos, and the recent “Night at the Museum” program, and just think “Wow! that’s pretty neat stuff.”

    …but I’m rambling. I do get the sense that you and I probably have some very different ideas about what brings value to the community and who should support it; and that’s fine. Having different opinions and being able to express them is what America’s all about. It’s what we fought the war for.

    #278798

    lightening
    Member

    Folks, quit your whining and follow the money. This is the inevitable consequence of looting by economic policies, The public meaning everyone except the gated upscale suburbs will have to pay the cost of the corporate free rides and regulatory looking the other way nonsense. OHS has only marginally covered the full spectrum of Ohio history anyway, preferring the touristy kitch to covering the struggles of working people in Ohio. OHS has been effective a captive to corporate interests for a long time. So, what happened in Ohio public schools when the history curriculum was weakened in favor of this idiocy of standardized tests being the only measure of education. Serpent Mound vandalized, most likely, and where were you when the giveaways were going on? When important archeological site were found near the Piketon nuclear waste storage faciltiy when it was to be re-licensed for processing, which interests won out? Before the Harmonic Convergence descended upon Serpent Mound it was all but closed down, and only then did the locals realize that it was some place very special. At the bottom of the whole structure are economic policies which favor allowing corporate interests determining who gets employed and where. The area around Ohio River up toward Piketon has been called Cancer Alley for years due to the chemical plants and the Piketon processing plant. In effect those people have been classified as expendable a long time ago. Putting things “back the way they were” is not near enough even if such sites are kept open.

    #278799
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    While I mostly agree with you, what are we going to do about it?

    I am trying to work on a bit of a plan here, such a long shot but I will try anyway. It will help when I get a new laptop– trying to work on anything using a keyboard attached to a computer attached to a TV sceen really kind of blows, particularly when you’re legally blind like I am. :)

    Anyway, Merc just sent me word that Arc of Appalachia will be overseeing management of Serpent Mound, it’s official. Now they just need volunteers to man the museum… any takers?

    #278800

    lightening
    Member

    My usual answer is to promote economic literacy as well as point out the connections between people’s outrage and pain to political campaign contributions relative to the extraction of wealth from our communities, both urban and rural. To do this I started learning myself that the way things are, are not in any way inevitable or really even the policies which are in the best intersts of our population as defined by our communities and land, not based upon corporate bonuses. The corporate interests are either determined by the structural fraud of banks determining which companies become the winners and in effect whose pocket get filled at whose expense. It seems that people need to be in serious pain before the narcosis of the econo-fairytales wears off such that they are even ready to listen to any information explaining why the financialized(aka casino) economy has run its course. For instance it is possible and even intelligent to have a full employment policy for every one who can and wants to be productive, if it is not limited to the company town model of monetary scarcity. And historically we have plenty of examples of those sort of situations in Ohio’s history, from the coal mining areas, to the timber/pulp, iron, brick, and glass making areas, and more.

Viewing 11 posts - 31 through 41 (of 41 total)

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