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Restaurant Rants

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  • #535601

    cbusmonkey
    Member

    Twixlen said:
    Pretty sure the words “no matter what” never were written by me, but much assumed by you. Regardless of how folks feel about the act of tipping, it’s the system we have – the people serving your food make a pitiful hourly wage; tips are the living. If you legitimately receive bad service, by all means, the tip should reflect that; even better, notify the manager. Sure, there are a load of people waiting tables/working front of the house who aren’t great at their jobs – just like there are a load of white collar desk drivers who aren’t great at their jobs. I also think for every person who isn’t the best at waiting tables, there’s at least one customer out there who’s a major PITA, and has unreasonable expectations about exactly what to expect of sit-down service.

    Saying “a server would have to pretty much take a shit in the middle of my plate for me to give less than a 20% tip” qualifies to me (and apparently others) as pretty much never. If that doesn’t mean never to you, please do tell me where you eat so I can never go there.

    Lets look up the definition of a tip and gratuity
    tip 4 (tp)
    n.
    1. A small sum of money given to someone for performing a service; a gratuity.

    gratuity [grəˈtjuːɪtɪ]
    n pl -ties
    1. (Business / Commerce) a gift or reward, usually of money, for services rendered; tip
    2. something given without claim or obligation
    3. (Military) Military a financial award granted for long or meritorious service

    “Without claim or obligation” seems to be a pretty important part of the definition. If prices need to be higher to give workers adequate income, thats what needs to be done. Tips and gratuity are a good way to keep restaurant professionals motivated to handle customer interactions well and a way to get immediate feedback on their service. If a kid does his homework completely wrong and you give him an A (or even B) anyways, whats his motivation to realize he did it wrong and to improve? “But I got an A!”

    If you enter the service industry and you don’t know how to be pleasant, don’t work in the front house. It is after all the service industry. I understand it’s hard work dealing with customers, but many many many other professionals deal with them too. I can’t imagine what tech support or sales teams deal with. They don’t get tipped, they are just expected to have a good attitude and help you with your their service (and a lot of them also fail at that, but that’s another rant)

    Telling me I should tip someone 20% when they didn’t fill my glass of water after asking for 15 minutes, wasn’t responsive, or just not very friendly is ludicrous. If I go eat somewhere I’m already paying the premium to be there. For me, the tip is how well they did their job. If they did really great and they were friendly they get tipped more than 20%. If not, less. But at no point should I feel obligated to tip someone for the sake of it.

    If it’s not obvious, my pet peeve is people who feel entitled to tips regardless of their performance.

    #535602

    Twixlen
    Participant

    Hey cbusmonkey, welcome to Columbus Underground.

    I’m going to guess that sarcasm and hyperbole don’t factor too much in your day to day language.

    Regardless of how you “feel” about tipping (and, by the way, using the 2nd definition for gratuity doesn’t work – the second and beyond definitions are for non-contextual uses of the words, for alternate meanings…), as mentioned previously, when you walk into a restaurant, you should already be prepared to pay your 20%. If your service is lacking – and really lacking, not some trumped up “I’m special and I deserve to be treated like a king where ever I go” lacking, by all means, tip less.

    Comparing front of the house work – hourly workers who are physically engaging in work, for a tiny wage – to tech/phone service people who’re getting benefits and making a solid 5 figures is silly. It’s a totally different sort of interaction, being in the front of the house, talking to a hundred+ new people a day than dealing with customers only by phone, or dealing with the same group of people continually.

    The fact is, because I’ve done the job, I have a load of respect for people doing it now. It’s hard – you’ll have a bad-terrible-no-good day, and STILL have to suck up to assholes who think they deserve your undivided in a crowded restaurant. Sometimes, you just can’t do it. It happens. It happens to everyone, it’s just not everyone is front of the house. I have a lot of forgiveness for that, because I’d have a lot harder time keeping my nice together now than I did in my 20’s.

    #535603

    groundrules
    Participant

    ah, the ol’ Webster’s cut/paste! a sure fire way to win the internet! </tip>

    #535604
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    groundrules said:
    ah, the ol’ Webster’s cut/paste! a sure fire way to win the internet! </tip>

    Also, the beginning of every high school graduation speech ever.

    “Webster’s dictionary defines success/friendship/achievement/whatever as blah blah blah…”

    #535605

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    There used to be a good fried-chicken joint across from the entrance to Delaware State Park. I was there for a Sunday brunch and the place was packed, but something had gone wrong with the scheduling and there was only one waitress on the floor. She was really hustling and doing her job well, but since everything was up to her, people had to wait for service. But they were understanding of the situation.

    #535606

    Schoolboy
    Participant

    Coremodels said:
    While I don’t pre-tip, I do tip VERY well at bars, and always get stellar service as a result. Best money ever spent.

    That is my biggest rant of all time… bartenders who do not remember a very well tipping patron.

    Often times I’ll actually call the bartender out.

    #535607

    Schoolboy
    Participant

    Once on third rock from the sun many many years ago, the aliens were introduced to tipping.

    Instaed they started out with a large pile of ones on the table, and every time they didn’t get some sort of expected service, they removed money.

    Always wanted to try that.

    #535608

    mrpoppinzs
    Member

    Schoolboy said:
    Once on third rock from the sun many many years ago, the aliens were introduced to tipping.

    Instaed they started out with a large pile of ones on the table, and every time they didn’t get some sort of expected service, they removed money.

    Always wanted to try that.

    glutton for punishment ;)

    #535609

    cbusmonkey
    Member

    Twixlen said:
    Hey cbusmonkey, welcome to Columbus Underground.

    I’m going to guess that sarcasm and hyperbole don’t factor too much in your day to day language.

    Regardless of how you “feel” about tipping (and, by the way, using the 2nd definition for gratuity doesn’t work – the second and beyond definitions are for non-contextual uses of the words, for alternate meanings…), as mentioned previously, when you walk into a restaurant, you should already be prepared to pay your 20%. If your service is lacking – and really lacking, not some trumped up “I’m special and I deserve to be treated like a king where ever I go” lacking, by all means, tip less.

    Comparing front of the house work – hourly workers who are physically engaging in work, for a tiny wage – to tech/phone service people who’re getting benefits and making a solid 5 figures is silly. It’s a totally different sort of interaction, being in the front of the house, talking to a hundred+ new people a day than dealing with customers only by phone, or dealing with the same group of people continually.

    The fact is, because I’ve done the job, I have a load of respect for people doing it now. It’s hard – you’ll have a bad-terrible-no-good day, and STILL have to suck up to assholes who think they deserve your undivided in a crowded restaurant. Sometimes, you just can’t do it. It happens. It happens to everyone, it’s just not everyone is front of the house. I have a lot of forgiveness for that, because I’d have a lot harder time keeping my nice together now than I did in my 20’s.

    Thanks for the welcome!

    Oh, I use hyperbole quite a bit. But when I use it to such extremes I actually mean an extreme. So to me “take a shit in the middle of [your] plate” means they have to do something *really really really* horrible to get there. What I said still stands… if someone has to do something really really really bad to not get 20% it defeats the purpose of the tip. This is besides the point that it should “never” really get that bad (or the place would go out of business).

    Let’s check another dictionary. Merriam Webster for this round:
    “gra·tu·ity noun grə-ˈtü-ə-tē, -ˈtyü-
    plural gra·tu·ities

    Definition of GRATUITY

    : something given voluntarily or beyond obligation usually for some service; especially : tip
    See gratuity defined for English-language learners »
    See gratuity defined for kids »
    Examples of GRATUITY

    A 15 percent gratuity is automatically added to the restaurant bill.
    <for parties of eight or more, we automatically add a 15% gratuity onto the bill>”

    That better? I figured the given examples would help solidify the usage. We can use the “beyond obligation” definition instead of my previous definition if you like that instead.

    I completely agree with your observation that many customers feel entitled to more than they deserve. If the place is slammed, staff should be cut a break. However in a place of food and drink, if they don’t give you food and drink in a friendly fashion… well, they have failed. However, this isn’t only about places that are crammed full of people, so you can’t just imply that’s always the case. You and I both know many times places are empty and people still can’t get it right. If its empty and they are too busy playing farmville rather than get you a drink, well… they fail at work (and life).

    I think you have a false notion about the work that phone/tech service people do. I think you will also be surprised by their wages. You would make more working (w/tips) at an average restaurant as a server than many of them. Also I think you aren’t seeing the differences. People are meaner over the phone (even worst via email), when they can’t see a face and they aren’t happy. “Say it to my face” is a phrase for a reason, most people won’t actually say harsh words to someones face… in this case a bad wait staff member. I personally don’t feel like getting into a potential argument when I’m supposed to be enjoying myself. I would also venture to say many people in the tech/phone service industry deal with many more new people in a day than a front house staff would.

    I don’t doubt it’s painstakingly hard. I also have a ton of respect for people that do the job. At the end of the day I’m not in the service industry because I would probably have punched someone in the face. So I made that self-realization and choice to place that outside of my capabilities. If someone isn’t capable of putting on a game face, other people are. If that doesn’t work, change the layout of the dining establishment so they don’t need as much face time. Set your customer expectations to what you want… if I’m paying a lot for a dinner with fancy tables and nice silverware, I expect to be treated as such. If I go into a place where you order at a counter, I expect my food to be hot and nothing else.

    Last I think you forget for every horrible customer there is a great one. Those customers don’t deserve to be treated poorly because the last guy was an asshole. You also can’t expect them to tip you because you had a bad day and thus fail to even fill up their water. That said, I’m far from a great customer but I have picked up the tip for tables that were just assholes to their wait staff… and I’ve seen others do that too.

    The moral of this rant is, if you work hard and keep your game face on you will be a better person for it… and should be rewarded for it. I will gladly give an enormous tip to someone that earnestly tried their absolute best. I’ve never had working hard and putting on a game face fail on me, and that applies to any profession.

    #535610

    cbusmonkey
    Member

    Schoolboy said:
    Once on third rock from the sun many many years ago, the aliens were introduced to tipping.

    Instaed they started out with a large pile of ones on the table, and every time they didn’t get some sort of expected service, they removed money.

    Always wanted to try that.

    I don’t remember where but some restaurant did something similar. They had a stack of coasters at the end of the table. When you weren’t happy you removed some.

    #535611

    cbusmonkey
    Member

    groundrules said:
    ah, the ol’ Webster’s cut/paste! a sure fire way to win the internet! </tip>

    ahem. it was The free internet dictionary by farlex.

    LOL

    #535612

    meltsintowonder
    Participant

    I don’t think everybody will agree on what percentage goes with which level of service but everybody is in the same ballpark. And the range of the “quality” of a server ranges just like the “quality” of a customer. The level of service can vary just like the expectations of the customer. Everybody is going to tip varying amounts, with people who are or have been servers typically tipping more because there’s an emotional connection and understanding of the job.

    The comment about being sympathetic for servers when they’re slammed and shortstaffed reminds me of something I’d like to add to the rant. There’s a watering hole that I frequent that’s typically packed on most nights and they’ll typically have 1-3 bartenders/servers total and there isn’t adequate service most of the time. They get more tip money to share because people are still going to tip, even if it’s crappy service. The buck a beer adds up pretty quickly. Why should they have more staff working if they’re going to remain busy and make money regardless?

    #535613

    MRipley
    Participant

    Pizza delivery person tipped $10 for a $1500 order. That’s 85 pies.

    http://money.msn.com/now/post.aspx?post=454a04fe-1fc7-4293-86fe-74e7c9856b9d

    #535614

    Jman4ever
    Participant

    MRipley said:
    Pizza delivery person tipped $10 for a $1500 order. That’s 85 pies.

    http://money.msn.com/now/post.aspx?post=454a04fe-1fc7-4293-86fe-74e7c9856b9d

    I saw that story. There has to be more to it.
    I mean 85 pies? That’s a lot for one driver to deliver to one location.

    #535615

    jackoh
    Participant

    Could someone enlighten me as to exactly who it was that (or how it was) determined that 20% (or 15%) is the standard-expected-required-or normal tip to be given for reasonable service in a restaurant?

Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 127 total)

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