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Restaurant Rants

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Viewing 15 posts - 91 through 105 (of 127 total)
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  • #535586

    leftovers
    Member

    meltsintowonder said:

    When you’re at a coffee shop, are they given a server’s wage or higher wage? Do you tip someone who pours you coffee out of an airpot? I know many who tip nothing while others tip 50%.

    I usually spot them a $1, same tip I give to a bartender who removes a cap from a bottle of beer.

    #535587

    mrpoppinzs
    Member

    I don’t think this happens often in Columbus, but in other large cities I have come across it where people will pre-tip bartenders $50 to $100 and that will cover their tips and the tips for drinks they buy for their friends. It tends to guarantee prompt service in a crowded bar if you plan to camp out for the evening.

    #535588
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    mrpoppinzs said:
    I don’t think this happens often in Columbus, but in other large cities I have come across it where people will pre-tip bartenders $50 to $100 and that will cover their tips and the tips for drinks they buy for their friends. It tends to guarantee prompt service in a crowded bar if you plan to camp out for the evening.

    While I don’t pre-tip, I do tip VERY well at bars, and always get stellar service as a result. Best money ever spent.

    #535589

    bucki12
    Member

    mrpoppinzs said:
    I don’t think this happens often in Columbus, but in other large cities I have come across it where people will pre-tip bartenders $50 to $100 and that will cover their tips and the tips for drinks they buy for their friends. It tends to guarantee prompt service in a crowded bar if you plan to camp out for the evening.

    That is pretty ingenious, especially at a busy bar that you aren’t a regular at.

    #535590

    Dotson
    Member

    I tip well at local neighborhood bars. If it is a packed place where I never will go again my tip is probably half of what it is at a neighborhood bar, which is $1 per drink.

    #535591

    Anonymous
    Inactive

    mrpoppinzs said:
    I don’t think this happens often in Columbus, but in other large cities I have come across it where people will pre-tip bartenders $50 to $100 and that will cover their tips and the tips for drinks they buy for their friends. It tends to guarantee prompt service in a crowded bar if you plan to camp out for the evening.

    My father used to do this. It drove me crazy at restaurants, because he wouldn’t tip on the drinks that the server brought him because he’d already tipped the bartender. Most people might no be aware that servers sometimes have to “tip out” the bartender a percentage of their tips.
    A friend insists on tipping the sushi chefs big and the waitress less at the sushi bar, because the chef does so much work. The server still brings the stuff from the kitchen and the drinks (and cleans up/takes order) and probably doesn’t make near the hourly wage as the chef. BUT, she also doesn’t slide an extra nice piece of toro across the sushi bar gratis.

    #535592

    Jman4ever
    Participant

    A couple of notes here.

    First there is this implied assumption that if you don’t tip the server they only make 2.12 per hour. This is not true, at least not legally. If the tipped worker is making less than the federal minimum wage after tips, then the owner of the restaurant is required to pay them up to the federal minimum wage.

    From the dept of labor

    Second-that minimum wage for tipped employees is not uniform across the land. In California tipped employees minimum wage is the same as it is for everyone else.

    Again from the dept. of labor…

    note the variety and range

    Third- I have never worked as a wait, but I have seen what they can make. Top waits at Max & Erma’s made in the low to mid 30s. Again, not 2% money, and you can bet that that money was earned with hard work, sweat and sore feet.

    Finally- It is often in the wait staffs best interest to make sure to share tips with other employees. After all, having your tables cleared off quickly means you get more tables, more checks and a better pay day. Also keeping the bartender happy means your drinks tend to get out quicker. In the long run the entire staff is in on this together.

    Smart restaurant owners (like Mrs. Lessner) will make sure to keep their best wait staff happy, after all the wait staff is the primary point of contact with those pesky customers.

    #535593

    lakeerietransplant
    Participant

    From CNN.com; How to effectively complain at a restaurant

    An article relevant to this discussion :)

    #535594

    lakeerietransplant
    Participant

    My peeves:

    1. Children under 6 at a restaurant/obnoxious parents: Bringing your child to a mid-level and up restaurant can ruin my time at an establishment. If I’m with friends or myself and I want to enjoy a drink while waiting or my dinner, the last thing I want to hear is a kid wailing or parents yelling at their kids to behave. If they can’t handle it, leave ’em at home.

    2. The tip has been beaten to death already, and most of you share my general view of tipping: Don’t suck, and you’ll at least get 20%. If you do suck, you get nothing.

    3. Sticky tables: I’m willing to wait a few minutes extra with no issues if you need to take more time to clean a table (hopefully with fresh soap and water).

    4. Terrible bathrooms: To have a roll empty at anytime is bad, but no soap is even worse IMP.

    5. If I hand you my card, please hand it back to me in my hand, don’t just lay it on the table if I have my hand out to receive it.

    #535595

    Elizabeth Lessner
    Participant

    shirtandpants said:
    if restaurant servers are considered to be professionals, then why don’t their employers just pay them a living wage in the first place (and benefits while we’re at it), instead of depending on customers to do it for them?

    If you don’t consider servers professionals, I’d like to invite you to spend an evening as a guest server at Surly Girl Saloon. It might change your opinion of our industry’s professionals and I’d be happy to host you anytime, preferably a Thursday, Friday or Saturday night. Our staff can share our benefits package with you, we’re pretty proud of it: medical/vision/dental/EAP and anyone is eligible if they work at least 23 hr/week. Oh, domestic partner benefits too.

    Employers do pay living wages and benefits, they simply employ different models to collect and compensate the service staff. At Northstar, your sandwich might cost $10 but tipping is not expected. At Betty’s, a similar sandwich would cost $8 but a tip would be expected. Either way, the customer is still paying for service, whether the money goes directly to the server or is paid to the establishment in the form of higher priced menu items.

    The original model started long before credit cards and allowed servers to pocket their tips tax free while employers either didn’t pay them at all or paid them very low wages under the table. When restaurants and bars were solely cash businesses, it was easy to hide sales and avoid payroll tax thanks to quick turning inventory and temporary and seasonal staffing paid under the table. Both server and employer were complicit in hiding cash sales and tipped income from the IRS to their individual benefit. Those days are long gone, especially as credit and debit have mostly replaced cash. I suspect the current model will also change as we’ve moved past the world of cash businesses and the ‘benefits’ of old just don’t apply to these current times.

    #535596

    buckette13
    Member

    lizless said:

    The original model started long before credit cards and allowed servers to pocket their tips tax free while employers either didn’t pay them at all or paid them very low wages under the table. When restaurants and bars were solely cash businesses, it was easy to hide sales and avoid payroll tax thanks to quick turning inventory and temporary and seasonal staffing paid under the table. Both server and employer were complicit in hiding cash sales and tipped income from the IRS to their individual benefit. Those days are long gone, especially as credit and debit have mostly replaced cash. I suspect the current model will also change as we’ve moved past the world of cash businesses and the ‘benefits’ of old just don’t apply to these current times.

    The tipping system does seem odd, this is very apparent when I have had to explain it to foreign visitors. I imagine the whole system is in need of an overhaul especially with the growing issues of health care. I think the majority of people would be better off with more uniformity across the board.

    #535597

    buckette13
    Member

    double post

    #535598

    CMH Gourmand
    Participant

    I forgot this one.

    Restaur-Rant Week Redux: One Last Rant and Some Rookie Mistakes

    No offense to margarine supporters.

    #535599

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    the dusty, yellowing, faded review on the wall

    Man how many of those are out there…

    One place that can get away with it is Thurns. Everything about that place is manifestly ancient, so they can get away with postings from a previous century.

    #535600

    FoodFort
    Participant

    alexs said:

    the dusty, yellowing, faded review on the wall

    Man how many of those are out there…

    One place that can get away with it is Thurns. Everything about that place is manifestly ancient, so they can get away with postings from a previous century.

    And how…..the old stuff at Thurn’s adds to the timeliness of the place for sure.

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