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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 127 total)
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  • #535525

    melikecheese
    Participant

    Get me what I ordered, and charge me the right price, and I am happy. Lifes too short to get upset about poor service. Just tip accordingly and move on with your life, don’t go back if you feel that’s warranted.

    I guess that’s my rant, when servers think a tip is required, even if they do a terrible job. It’s a tip, you picked a job with pay that is almost all tips, so don’t do a terrible job. It’s rare, but I have left $1 on a large check if the mistakes and poor service just keep coming.

    #535526

    Elizabeth Lessner
    Participant

    CMH Gourmand said:
    No offense was meant in use of the term and reading the context of the body of the post – which contains at least a large serving of sarcasm, I am surpised that offense was taken as it was.

    Denigrating professionals that choose jobs or careers in foodservice has grown tired to many of us in the industry.

    Rant away about bad customer service experiences and other restaurant related injustices and injuries you have experienced, but please don’t needlessly attack every person whose ever chosen a job or career as a host, server, cook, or cashier in the process.

    #535527

    Dotson
    Member

    So we have expanded the use of the word professional to include cashiers and cooks? Who knew when cities were trying to attract young professionals what they really meant were more cashiers and cooks.

    #535529

    joev
    Participant

    CMH Gourmand said:
    All are examples of 1st world problems…..which are not really problems. All of the rants should be taken with a grain of salt, unless of course you would prefer local salt, organic free range salt or are allergic to salt, which may be another post now that I think about it.

    These people seem to prefer bile to salt.

    #535530

    Bear
    Participant

    This thread has prompted me to think about my own experiences. In the vast majority of cases, a satisfying restaurant experience for me involves:

    1. You feed me
    2. I pay you
    3. Neither one of us is a dick

    The more I like the other stuff (good food, ambience, pleasant service, etc.), the more likely I’ll be back, but I generally don’t feel the need or desire to “fix” a shortfall in those areas… it is what it is.

    One other point I should raise: Restaurant folks certainly have an equally damning list of complaints about diners. We might have a few restaurant experiences a week; they have hundreds. But they can’t make those complaints in public, for fear of losing business (Liz being a rare exception.) On their behalf, I’d suggest expanding the topic to include rants about customers as well—most likely other customers!, but if you’ve done something regrettable, don’t hesitate to unburden yourself.

    #535531

    Bear
    Participant

    Dotson said:
    So we have expanded the use of the word professional to include cashiers and cooks? Who knew when cities were trying to attract young professionals what they really meant were more cashiers and cooks.

    So much for rule #3.

    #535532

    Dotson
    Member

    Bear said:
    So much for rule #3.

    No, just another pet peeve of mine, everyone being a professional. I think I will just start calling myself an astronaut. Maybe this is best for the pet peeve thread. My apologies.

    #535533
    Porky
    Porky
    Participant

    hajames66 said:
    My most common complaint is about pacing. If I order an appetizer, salad, entree, and dessert none of them should be on the table at the same time.

    This has become enough of a common occurrence that my wife and I have started keeping the menu hostage and ordering each course separately. It’s a pain in the but having the menu crowding the table, but less of a pain than trying to wolf down a salad so that my entree doesn’t get cold.

    +1
    Also waiters who know nothing about the menu. It’s like have you ate here? We were recently at a fairly nice local establishment, the name of which I’ll with hold, and my wife asked about the salad on the menu and our server proceeded to tell us, “I don’t know, I don’t eat salads I’m strictly a carnivore”. I feel that the server should @ least have some idea of the food that is on the menu and I’m sure the owner or manager would have just shuddered had they heard her.

    #535534

    Bear
    Participant

    Dotson said:
    No, just another pet peeve of mine, everyone being a professional. I think I will just start calling myself an astronaut. Maybe this is best for the pet peeve thread. My apologies.

    Ah. Thanks, and sorry to have misread your post.

    #535535

    Twixlen
    Participant

    As someone who has waited tables in different establishments, tended bar, and worked the various jobs in the back of the house from running the Hobart to chopping onions, to filling out the dairy invoice, to cleaning up kid-puke off the steakhouse floor, to putting out trash can fires, endless et al, a server would have to pretty much take a shit in the middle of my plate for me to give less than a 20% tip.

    When you walk into the restaurant (sit-down, full service), that 20% is already out of your pocket – it’s the *least* someone should expect to pay, for standard service. If they go above and beyond, the tip should dang well reflect that. If there was something about the meal that you didn’t like – something that was beyond the server’s control – still 20%.

    There are absolutely people waiting tables, or working other jobs inside the industry that consider themselves professionals at what they do. They’ve made it their career, and do their jobs damn well. It doesn’t take a 4 year degree to make someone a professional. There are plenty of smart people in the world who could never have the right skills to work in a restaurant.

    Sidenote: Restaurant-working stories are some of the best stories ever. The stuff that goes on behind the scenes is unbelievable. It was one of the best and hardest jobs I ever had.

    #535536
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    Twixlen said:
    As someone who has waited tables in different establishments, tended bar, and worked the various jobs in the back of the house from running the Hobart to chopping onions, to filling out the dairy invoice, to cleaning up kid-puke off the steakhouse floor, to putting out trash can fires, endless et al, a server would have to pretty much take a shit in the middle of my plate for me to give less than a 20% tip.

    When you walk into the restaurant (sit-down, full service), that 20% is already out of your pocket – it’s the *least* someone should expect to pay, for standard service. If they go above and beyond, the tip should dang well reflect that. If there was something about the meal that you didn’t like – something that was beyond the server’s control – still 20%.

    There are absolutely people waiting tables, or working other jobs inside the industry that consider themselves professionals at what they do. They’ve made it their career, and do their jobs damn well. It doesn’t take a 4 year degree to make someone a professional. There are plenty of smart people in the world who could never have the right skills to work in a restaurant.

    Sidenote: Restaurant-working stories are some of the best stories ever. The stuff that goes on behind the scenes is unbelievable. It was one of the best and hardest jobs I ever had.

    I once poked my head into local bar/restaurant kitchen to see if anyone wanted to smoke a doobie I had, which was met with much delight. Kitchen staff are my people and that’s kind of a tip really.

    #535537

    Dotson
    Member

    Twixlen said:
    As someone who has waited tables in different establishments, tended bar, and worked the various jobs in the back of the house from running the Hobart to chopping onions, to filling out the dairy invoice, to cleaning up kid-puke off the steakhouse floor, to putting out trash can fires, endless et al, a server would have to pretty much take a shit in the middle of my plate for me to give less than a 20% tip.

    When you walk into the restaurant (sit-down, full service), that 20% is already out of your pocket – it’s the *least* someone should expect to pay, for standard service. If they go above and beyond, the tip should dang well reflect that. If there was something about the meal that you didn’t like – something that was beyond the server’s control – still 20%.

    There are absolutely people waiting tables, or working other jobs inside the industry that consider themselves professionals at what they do. They’ve made it their career, and do their jobs damn well. It doesn’t take a 4 year degree to make someone a professional. There are plenty of smart people in the world who could never have the right skills to work in a restaurant.

    Sidenote: Restaurant-working stories are some of the best stories ever. The stuff that goes on behind the scenes is unbelievable. It was one of the best and hardest jobs I ever had.

    And plenty of people who do work in restaurants also lack those skills. 20% no matter what? In the words of the professional wordsmith young jeezy. Where dey do dat at?

    #535538

    bucki12
    Member

    If it is 20% mandatory minimum then I think it should just be part of their hourly wage and have that figured into the food costs (and tip good service on top of that). Are we just going to keep increasing the percentage we tip when the restaurant should start figuring more per hour for employees?

    #535539

    DTown
    Participant

    Twixlen said:
    … a server would have to pretty much take a shit in the middle of my plate for me to give less than a 20% tip.

    Fantastic. Now, and for the rest of my life, I am going to have that image in my mind every single time I go into a restaurant.

    #535540

    Elizabeth Lessner
    Participant

    hajames, I agree on pacing, it’s one of our biggest weaknesses and it makes me crazy! Lots of reasons why it happens but it’s so frustrating on the diner side, I agree.

    Dotson, I do consider cashiers professionals, yes. I used the example of cashier because it was used in the original post. Foodservice is the largest employer of women and minorities in management roles. Flexible hours provide greater work opportunities for single parents and the ease of re-entry into the workforce allows the under-employed and unemployed to get back into the workforce more readily. Foodservice is one of the few remaining industries that one could go from being a dishwasher to running the company. Our current COO started at Betty’s as a prep cook. I’m not sure why the dismissive attitude towards those that choose to work these jobs. These are solid jobs that often lead to better jobs and other opportunities. White Castle and Wendy’s are two other good examples of people starting as cashiers and becoming high level managers.

    I receive plenty of customer gripes, we screw up a lot. Most of the problems that our customers experience have more to do with my own mistakes in managing, training or hiring than anything an hourly worker has done. I don’t really have any gripes about our customers. We’re not for everyone and we understand that.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 127 total)

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