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Columbus Education Commission

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  • #527876

    News
    Participant

    Mayor Coleman Wants School Board To Wait On Hiring Superintendent
    Posted: Mar 26, 2013 2:41 PM EDT
    By: Steve Wainfor – email

    Mayor Michael Coleman has made it clear that he would not support anyone who is hired as superintendent by the Columbus School Board by June of this year. Coleman stated that he would prefer that the school board wait until the findings are presented regarding the attendance investigation being led by the Auditor of State. He thinks the board should consider the recommendations given by his Columbus Education Commission.

    READ MORE: http://www.nbc4i.com/story/21798238/mayor-coleman-wants-school-board-to-wait-on-hiring

    #527877

    News
    Participant

    Press Release:
    Commission to take up strategies on Wednesday
    April 3, 2013

    The Columbus Education Commission has spent the past three months asking tough questions about how to improve the lives our children. Next week, commissioners will begin refining their answers.

    They will focus on four strategies to improve education in Columbus at the April 10 meeting, which will take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the King Arts Complex. Commissioners will also hear from experts on Ohio’s new academic distress law, school climate issues and charter school leadership and accountability.

    The April 26 agenda will consider two more strategies and the commission’s implementation plan.

    • April 10 agenda
    • State of the art teaching tools and methods
    • Students with a purpose: career pathways
    • A quality early childhood education for every Columbus child
    • Community ownership and engagement: serving the whole child
    • April 26 agenda
    • Effective teachers and principals
    • High-performing neighborhood schools and more school choices

    These six strategies reflect what the Commission has learned over the past three months during a dozen meetings, tours of local schools, a massive community outreach effort and presentations from national leaders such as Geoffrey Canada, founder of the Harlem Children’s Zone. Draft documents will be posted before the meeting.

    Most of the April 10 meeting will be devoted to discussing recommendations, but the Commission also will spend the morning learning from experts about these topics:

    • Academic distress law: The Ohio law governing when the state must take over school districts has been revised. Jeannette Oxender, former chief of staff at the Ohio Department of Education, will review how the new law works and the implications for Columbus City Schools.

    • School safety, school climate and preventing dropouts: Community members often spoke about these topics during community forums, so the commission has invited Bob Balfanz of Johns Hopkins University to address them head-on. The White House declared Balfanz a “Champion of Change” for his work, especially around helping African American students succeed in school. He also has been working with three Columbus high schools.

    • Charter school leadership and accountability: Mike Feinberg, one of the founders of KIPP, will speak about how the charter school network makes decisions. Which powers are centralized, and which ones are left to individual building leaders? How does KIPP recruit, train and keep talented educators to its school? With more than 41,000 students in 125 schools, KIPP operates in 27 cities nationwide. (In Columbus, KIPP runs the Journey Academy middle school.)

    Preparing recommendations

    The final recommendations and report will be delivered to Mayor Michael Coleman and City Council President Andrew J. Ginther, who asked the commission to address the future of education in Columbus. To see their charge to the commission, click here.

    The April 10 meeting will be held at the King Arts Complex (see map) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. As with previous meetings, it will be open to the public and we’ll be live-tweeting the conversation from @ReimagineCbusEd.

    #527878

    News
    Participant

    Board Reverses Course, Follows Mayor’s Recommendations
    April 10, 2013
    by Steve Brown
    89.7 NPR News Morning Anchor

    The Columbus School Board surprised many Tuesday night by voting to put off its search for a permanent superintendent. The board had been heavily criticized by Mayor Michael Coleman, who wanted the district to hire a temporary replacement for the retiring Gene Harris and make a final decision after getting input from a new city education commission.

    READ MORE: http://wosu.org/2012/news/2013/04/10/board-reverses-course-follows-mayors-recommendations/

    #527879

    News
    Participant

    #527880

    News
    Participant

    Columbus Education Commission Proposes Changes But No Takeover
    April 24, 2013
    by Mandie Trimble
    89.7 NPR News Reporter

    Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman’s Columbus Education Commission has released proposals it said could help improve the struggling Columbus City Schools.

    READ MORE: http://wosu.org/2012/news/2013/04/24/education-commission-proposes-changes-but-no-takeover/

    #527881

    NDaEast
    Participant

    The solution to a failed political institution (the school board) is not less democracy, it is a re-commitment to democracy. The reason CCS is in such a mess is because we elect weak school board members, with limited information about them, from a pool of weak candidates. When was the last time a member of the business community ran for elected office? If business is concerned about the schools, they need to run candidates for public office — not wait on the sidelines for an unaccountable set-aside. And all of us as citizens need to be more informed about the issues, and more demanding of the outcomes.

    One solution to the current data scandal is to simply enforce criminal laws. If County Prosecutor Ron O’Brien moved forward and had several of these white collar criminals doing the “perp walk,” it would put a whole lot of prospective nonsense in check. But this community seems intent to give these perps a free pass — deferring to the FBI or the state. Stand up Columbus, and do what is right for the kids and our community.

    If we had a strong local commitment to support fair elections — by using CTV-3 and the CCS Public Access Channel to provide information about candidates and candidate debates — voters would have better and non-biased information when they hit the election booth, rather than 30-second paid commercials.

    Finally, the Commission’s recommendation that the City Council President be one of the five people who would appoint an Independent Auditor is delicious in its irony, as the current City Council President Andrew Ginther: 1) ignored whistle-blowers who alerted him to the data scrubbing back in 2004 when he chaired the school board’s Audit and Accountability Committee … 2) was complicit in firing the CCS Internal Auditor who was set to investigate those anonymous tips in 2005 … and 3) then never ensured that that Board-approved audit of the enrollment data was completed with the new Internal Auditor in the next two years of his chairmanship of the CCS Audit and Accountability Committee. It is unbelieveable to think that Mr. Ginther would again be put in a position to oversee another auditor — he had his chance and failed Columbus miserably — not once, not twice, but three times.

    The solution to a sorry school board is for the community leadership to really focus on how it has failed in making elections accessible and important, so that voters have access to information to educate themselves about the candidates and the issues. Instead, our community leadership disempowers voters at every opportunity: whether the abuse of the council appointment process (where only 3 council members in the last 28 years were elected — all the rest appointed), the maintenance of the most expensive election format possible to restrict competition (At Large City Wide council elections), and the removal of public access television from the citizens of Columbus.

    We need better democracy, but the Education Commission proposes more of the same: less involvement of people and less accountability.

    #527882

    News
    Participant

    School Issues: Winners/Losers & A Good Plan
    Published on April 25, 2013 1:48 pm
    By: Miriam Bowers Abbott

    Sometime in the wee hours of Wednesday morning, Carolyn Smith tweeted these words,

    “Commission school plan eliminates current Internal Auditor.”

    You might not know who Carolyn Smith is. You might not even care, but you should. She’s the current internal auditor for Columbus City Schools.

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/school-issues-winnerslosers-a-good-plan-ma1

    #527883

    NDaEast
    Participant

    News said:
    School Issues: Winners/Losers & A Good Plan
    Published on April 25, 2013 1:48 pm
    By: Miriam Bowers Abbott

    Sometime in the wee hours of Wednesday morning, Carolyn Smith tweeted these words,

    “Commission school plan eliminates current Internal Auditor.”

    You might not know who Carolyn Smith is. You might not even care, but you should. She’s the current internal auditor for Columbus City Schools.

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/school-issues-winnerslosers-a-good-plan-ma1

    That is a fantastic article by Ms. Abbott … I encourage all to read it.

    #527884

    News
    Participant

    Press Release:
    Mayor, Council President Embrace Columbus Education Commission Recommendations

    Mayor Michael B. Coleman and City Council President Andrew J. Ginther today endorsed the recommendations of the Columbus Education Commission and saluted the Commission members for their outstanding work and for committing their time and talents to the cause of educating kids in Columbus. The Commission report, if implemented, would offer Columbus families good schools in their own neighborhoods and help prepare their children for a lifetime of success.

    “Today marks a turning point for our children and our city,” Mayor Coleman said. “Columbus is now aligned behind the cause of reimagining education and aligned behind a plan for bold change to make real improvements. The 25 members of this Commission, its director, Eric Fingerhut, and its hardworking staff have earned the eternal gratitude of this entire community.”

    “I would like to thank the members of the Columbus Education Commission for their tireless work in developing these innovative recommendations,” said Council President Ginther. “The mayor and I look forward to engaging the community in conversation and working with the Columbus Board of Education and all stakeholders to chart a path for success for Columbus City Schools and the children we serve.”

    The recommendations include specific strategies for expanding early-childhood education, improving technology, increasing career readiness, recruiting quality teachers and principals, replicating successful district schools, attracting successful charter schools, streamlining district operations, refocusing district policies and choosing an outstanding, innovative schools superintendent. Because education is everybody’s responsibility, the Columbus Education Commission also recommended a new level of leadership and accountability to ensure the full implementation of these bold proposals. These recommendations include creation of an independent schools auditor, creation of a public-private partnership for education and creation of a director of educational improvement reporting to the mayor.

    The full Columbus Education Commission report can be found online at http://reimaginecolumbuseducation.org/ .

    #527885

    News
    Participant

    Release: Education commission unanimously approves recommendations
    April 26, 2013

    In a unanimous vote, the Columbus Education Commission agreed on a set of recommendations to ensure every child in our community graduates ready for life and career.

    After incorporating edits from today’s discussion, the recommendations will be delivered to Mayor Michael B. Coleman and Council President Andrew Ginther on Tuesday, April 30. The draft recommendations discussed and provisionally approved today are posted online at: reimaginecolumbuseducation.org. They cover these

    • Implementation: A new community compact for educational excellence
    • Effective teachers and principals
    • High-performing neighborhood schools and more school choices
    • Students with a purpose (career- and college-readiness)
    • State-of-the-art teaching tools, materials and data
    • Every Columbus child is kindergarten ready
    • Serving the whole child

    The commission’s final recommendations will be posted online at reimaginecolumbuseducation.org. The website also includes summaries and videos of all of the commission’s public meetings, lessons learned from an extensive series of public forums and research that guided the commission.

    Background

    Coleman and Ginther created the 25-member Columbus Education Commission to examine the challenges and opportunities facing all children living within the Columbus City Schools district, from preschool to career, and develop specific recommendations that will:

    enable all of our children to succeed in the city’s vibrant,
    make Columbus a global leader in developing the highly skilled, creative, entrepreneurial workforce that will propel economic growth in the 21st Century,
    leverage the resourcefulness of our entire community to meet these goals.
    The co-chairpeople of the commission are George S. Barrett, chairman and chief executive officer of Cardinal Health; U.S. District Court Judge Algenon L. Marbley; and Kathleen H. Ransier, a retired partner in the Columbus office of Vorys, Sater, Seymour and Pease.

    #527886

    News
    Participant

    #527887

    News
    Participant

    School Issues: A Letter from Mike Wiles
    Published on June 2, 2013 7:00 am
    By: Miriam Bowers Abbott

    Editorial note: This week, the Ohio House of Representatives passed HB 167. Assuming passage in the senate, the bill will put a school levy on the November ballot for Columbus voters. School Board Member, Mike Wiles, has a few words to say about the contents of the legislation, education reform and the press coverage surrounding it. It’s 1,000 words worth reading:

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/school-issues-a-letter-from-mike-wiles-ma1

    #527888

    NDaEast
    Participant

    Mike Wiles is the only school board member who consistently makes sense on behalf of the children, parents and taxpayers of Columbus City Schools. Mr. Wiles is plainspoken and doesn’t dress real snazzy, and if people listened to and appreciated the content of his ideas Columbus schools would be better for it. What I see is an elitist system that doesn’t take him seriously because he isn’t as “polished” as some of the other members. But on every major issue, he is either right on target or articulating a serious point of view for things that need broader and deeper discussion. If he had a couple allies on the board, we would finally have a board that is seeks to do well and that is accountable, rather than an envisioned stepping stone for higher office.

    I agree with Mr. Wiles on a number of points related to this bad legislation. It contains a backdoor way for local elected officials to support an utterly undeserving levy by Columbus public schools, by mixing it up with levy funding for a Mayoral system of charter school “reforms,” which allows all the heavy hitters to support what is primarily a CCS levy. CCS hasn’t cleaned house, hasn’t acknowledged wrong-doing, and has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees to keep the public from knowing.

    Levy funding for charter schools is a policy issue that should be debated (and voted upon) by the citizenry as a separate issue from funding CCS. All the local politicians want a CCS levy to pass (in part because of all the union jobs it supports), but none has been willing to either publicly say so or push for accountability. And again, the thought of any reform having Andrew Ginther and Carol Perkins — two of the people most closely associated with the data scrubbing scandal — oversee an “independent” auditor is insulting to the voters.

    There are lots of reasons to reject the state legislation, and Mr. Wiles outlines several.

    #527889

    News
    Participant

    Ninety-Five Percent of CCS Parents are Ex-Cons
    Published on June 11, 2013 4:00 pm
    By: Miriam Bowers Abbott

    In terms of local media, All Sides is a well-regarded radio program. Aired weekdays on WOSU, listeners can usually find a thoughtful and provocative collection of thoughts from experts and guests.

    On the education scene, it’s hard to beat today’s disclosure guest Stephanie Hightower. The program title was The Challenges of Fatherhood in the Inner City. Hightower was representing the Columbus Urban League, and she also happens to be a member of the Columbus Education Commission. This is what she said:

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/ninety-five-percent-of-ccs-parents-are-ex-cons-ma1

    #527890

    News
    Participant

    Press Release:
    Final Community Meeting to Discuss Columbus Education Commission Recommendations
    June 18, 2013

    The Columbus Education Commission’s Community Outreach team will host a final public forum to discuss the recommendations of the Columbus Education Commission.

    Where:
    Columbus Downtown High School
    364 South 4th St

    When:
    Wednesday, June 19th
    6pm

    The full report of the Columbus Education Commission can be viewed at:

    http://reimaginecolumbusedcation.org/the-report/

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 46 total)

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