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Recreate German Village Design?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development Recreate German Village Design?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • #1104651
    Ned23
    Ned23
    Participant

    Do you suppose any developers would ever try to recreate the design and layout style of classic German Village in a new construction? Why or wny not?

    #1104660

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    There was a radio reading of a short story about this. They find century-old architectural plans and they can afford to build. They faced issues like having to special-order lumber bigger than current specs, building elaborate roof structure, and installing gas lights.

    BTW in case you haven’t seen this – some of those houses have wall-mounted gas light fixtures with mantles, like an old-style gasoline camping lantern.

    #1104669

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    There’s actually a newer subdivision up in Avon Lake near Cleveland that is based on German Village.

    Street are named Schiller, Kossuth, Jaeger, Hanford, Brust, etc; houses are styled like GV cottages; and everything’s spaced closer together than typical suburban design.

    Check it out,
    https://www.google.com/maps/@41.4852165,-81.9871274,427m/data=!3m1!1e3
    https://goo.gl/maps/zSX3mJV2bfF2
    https://goo.gl/maps/cHk2ed35ky52

    #1104689

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    Wow, thanks so much for that Google Map link! What an interesting exercise in architectural mimicry. I wonder if the folks at GVS know about this?

    #1104713
    Josh_W
    Josh_W
    Participant

    Needs brick streets and sidewalks, but still pretty cool.

    #1104882
    Ned23
    Ned23
    Participant

    There’s actually a newer subdivision up in Avon Lake near Cleveland that is based on German Village.

    Street are named Schiller, Kossuth, Jaeger, Hanford, Brust, etc; houses are styled like GV cottages; and everything’s spaced closer together than typical suburban design.

    Check it out,<br>
    https://www.google.com/maps/@41.4852165,-81.9871274,427m/data=!3m1!1e3<br>
    https://goo.gl/maps/zSX3mJV2bfF2<br>
    https://goo.gl/maps/cHk2ed35ky52

    How weird! They obviously made some “modern” concessions. The yards are bigger and the houses are farther from the road, the alleys are humongous and it’s not really near anything resembling an “urban” area and it’s not peppered with businesses. But still fascinating, nonetheless.

    #1104910

    jackoh
    Participant

    Ah, the genius of America! We can create a fake anything, who needs authenticity. If anyone doubts this ability all that they have to do is to spend anytime in Phoenix, Arizona. There you will see midwestern and new england landscapes recreated in the desert, at horrible expense and damage to the native environment. I’ve always thought that the mantra for American enterprise should be “build it and the fools will come”.

    #1105008
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    There’s actually a newer subdivision up in Avon Lake near Cleveland that is based on German Village.

    Street are named Schiller, Kossuth, Jaeger, Hanford, Brust, etc; houses are styled like GV cottages; and everything’s spaced closer together than typical suburban design.

    Bizarre. Isn’t the entire point of a suburban subdivision the enormous plots of land? Why wouldn’t someone who wants this just move into the city?

    #1105015

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>heresthecasey wrote:</div>
    There’s actually a newer subdivision up in Avon Lake near Cleveland that is based on German Village.

    Street are named Schiller, Kossuth, Jaeger, Hanford, Brust, etc; houses are styled like GV cottages; and everything’s spaced closer together than typical suburban design.

    Bizarre. Isn’t the entire point of a suburban subdivision the enormous plots of land? Why wouldn’t someone who wants this just move into the city?

    Lots of people are afraid of cities, whether consciously or subconsciously. This, to some, would be the best of both worlds–like the New Urbanism. They can have quaint homes on small lots in a more rural setting where they have a stronger perception of safety and less economic diversity.

    #1105020

    ohbr
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>heresthecasey wrote:</div>
    There’s actually a newer subdivision up in Avon Lake near Cleveland that is based on German Village.

    Street are named Schiller, Kossuth, Jaeger, Hanford, Brust, etc; houses are styled like GV cottages; and everything’s spaced closer together than typical suburban design.

    Bizarre. Isn’t the entire point of a suburban subdivision the enormous plots of land? Why wouldn’t someone who wants this just move into the city?

    Not necessarily true. There are plenty of developments suburbs that are packed in to small plots of land. Think of all the condo communities and apartment complexes the suburbs have. This appears to be that midpoint. Also look at the urbanization of suburban communities, i.e. Dublin. It’s not just the big plots of land that draw people to the suburbs. Clearly plenty of people who are ok with living close to their neighbors are also choosing the burbs over the city. My guess is this community is made up of older homeowners who don’t want large houses or yards because it will be too hard to maintain eventually but still want to have enough space to call their own. My grandparents just made that shift in another metro. moving even further into the suburbs for a smaller home, on smaller land, in a denser neighborhood because they didn’t want to be in a city.

    #1105039

    wpcc88
    Participant

    People move to the suburbs for the schools. For too long big city governments have ignored their schools and therefore people are almost forced to the suburbs. I will admit despite the scandal Columbus does a good job or at least better than most with theirs but it’s still not as good as a suburban school system.

    #1105117

    dubdave00
    Participant

    I recently entertained the idea of a suburban developer building a German Village-inspired subdivision with a friend in the business. With more suburbs considering grid-based codes in certain areas, I think it’s certainly possible it could happen.

    I think a city like Dublin would totally consider a development like the Avon Lake one, only I imagine Dublin would approve actual urban setbacks these days (Depending on the area). Even if it’s just a residential developer (Like an M/I, Rockford, or Fischer), I imagine a city like Dublin would encourage the developer to create clubhouses, workout centers, and a community restaurant that resemble the independent commercial buildings in GV.

    This all said, I doubt you’d see many developers wanting to use any of the authentic materials that make GV what it is, due to price and niche skilled labor constraints. The brick or paver streets are probably a “no”, due to snow plow concerns and price. But potentially brick sidewalks and brick crosswalks could show up as those are used in many high-end suburbs already. The gas street lamps could happen. The under-the-street tunnel / wine-cellars, probably not going to happen.

    I think they would market it to families looking for a more urban experience but with suburban schools and newer construction for the same price as a pre-existing with reno work.

    #1105203

    Mike88
    Participant

    I find this is incredibly interesting. I like the points made about Dublin and how they’re increasing their density in an effort to becoming a more “urban suburb”.

    I think if you were able to work in patches of hosing like what you see in that Avon Lake development near the new “urban” centers like Dublin is building you could see lots of success. The key to me would be making sure that shops and businesses were built within walking distance of the housing.

    If I had kids of School age and you offered me that Avon Lake/GV subdivision within Walking distance of Downtown Dublin it would be hard to say no to. And as a rule I generally abhor the suburbs.

    #1105384
    Ned23
    Ned23
    Participant

    I find this is incredibly interesting. I like the points made about Dublin and how they’re increasing their density in an effort to becoming a more “urban suburb”.

    Densifying is also a way to expand your tax base when you’re all built out at low density. Upper Arlington is going through the same problem. For decades UA zoned out businesses and dense residential areas, then their infrastructure started to age and they didn’t have the tax base to maintain it, which has resulted in sky-high property taxes in order to maintain the level of shine and polish they wanted.

    #1105420

    ImNotaStar
    Participant

    Clearly no one has been to the great state up north and checked out Detroit’s suburbs. Birmingham is denser than the city of Detroit. I would compare it to if you movoved the short north to the burbs except it’s better than the short north as it has much more amenities imo.Also it is very very wealthy community with billionaires living there.

    While Birmingham is my favorite, Detroit had many burbs that are walkable including: royal oak, ferndsle, Rochester, and Even gross pointe’s downtown area.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)

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