Our City Online

Messageboard - General Columbus Discussion

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

Raising Kids in The City

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Raising Kids in The City

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 106 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #548383

    joev
    Participant

    Aaron Marshall said:
    That’s why the white people left to start with.

    So all the racist white people are gone. I think mixing students up is not a bad solution.

    #548385

    AmyD
    Participant

    Something I wasn’t aware of was that the rating of the school makes a difference when applying to colleges. Our son just started college this year and I had no idea that an “A” at one high school doesn’t equal and “A” at another.

    #548386

    MrChengsaw
    Participant

    Chris, I’m curious which charter school you decided to enroll your child at? I’m not too familiar with the Columbus area charter options, though some quick internet research says that Columbus Preparatory Academy (Mosaica) appears to be a good option.

    #548387

    dirtgirl
    Participant

    <hijack>I want Aaron Marshall to tell me where to get free weed.</hijack>

    #548388
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    Aaron Marshall said:
    You behind me a couple grades at CAHS?

    LOL, the people in the grades above you loom so large in your mind, but you never remember the kids behind you. I was a freshman when you were a senior.

    And your wife introduced me to my wife :)

    MrChengsaw said:
    Chris, I’m curious which charter school you decided to enroll your child at? I’m not too familiar with the Columbus area charter options, though some quick internet research says that Columbus Preparatory Academy (Mosaica) appears to be a good option.

    We’ll be at Graham Elementary. It’s almost brand new, but Graham has a good track record with their upper level schools.

    I’m not convinced that charter schools are good policy in the larger picture, but I definitely appreciate having them as an option as a parent with a school aged child.

    #548389

    rory
    Participant

    joev said:
    So all the racist white people are gone. I think mixing students up is not a bad solution.

    All the racist people might have left but a lot of them want to move back to the city for walkable urban neighborhoods. And a lot of them don’t have children yet. Columbus’ growth prospects are dimmer if every YP that lives downtown and in adjacent areas is going to move to the suburbs in a couple years for the schools. Hence, a parallel charter school system. That’s the interesting thing about the school system in Columbus, it’s all about development and has very little to do with education.

    #548390

    AmyJ
    Participant

    My son attended a charter school (Imagine/Great Western Academy) from K-2, our neighborhood assigned school (Salem) from grades 3-4 and then his ECLIPSE (part of the gifted program at CCS) assigned school (Winterset) in grade 5 and now a lottery-pick middle school (Ridgeview) for 6-7th. Through all of these experiences, the one thing I realized is that the kids with parents advocating for them are the kids that are going to do well. It is so easy for kids to slip through the cracks in any school system, so you need to commit yourself to being there and making change happen.

    There are so many great neighborhood groups out there now helping to facilitate conversations and change, so I suggest attending meetings with school officials, joining the Facebook groups and brainstorming with your neighbors and other parents to get your voices heard. It’s really the only way things are going to change.

    #548392

    dirtgirl
    Participant

    Rory, the connection to development is interesting and could explain why the first two contributors to the Reimagine Columbus (school levy) effort were both Real Estate interests and the treasurer (who doesn’t live in Columbus) practices construction/real estate law.

    #548393

    rory
    Participant

    dirtgirl said:
    Rory, the connection to development is interesting and could explain why the first two contributors to the Reimagine Columbus (school levy) effort were both Real Estate interests and the treasurer (who doesn’t live in Columbus) practices construction/real estate law.

    The Columbus education development connection isn’t a new idea (nor is it mine) but it’s been around for quite a while and it’s pretty well documented. And it’s free online.

    Getting Around Brown: Desegregation, Development, and Columbus Public Schools

    The proposed fixed is kind of goofy but the rest of the book is not only excellent but a lot of the same people keep popping up in Columbus education and development. If you have any interest in the history of Columbus development it’s a winner.

    #548394

    TaraK
    Participant

    We’re at the point of planning to buy a house and have a kid here in Columbus. We very much value education (we both teach at OSU right now), and initially, the school situation was startling. We want to buy in Merion Village or Clintonville.

    To whoever said some crap about sacrificing your kids’ education to live where you want, here’s what we decided:

    1) Ultimately, we’re responsible for their education, not the school, and in more way that one. We take take a role in that school, in their life, etc. A school won’t turn my child into anything it isn’t.

    2) Location isn’t a decision you make just for the kid: you need to consider the whole family. Kids don’t benefit from parents having a long work commute or living in an area with no diversity either. School division can’t be the most impactful factor. Let’s choose a place where we’ll all be happy, have friends nearby, be safe, be able to walk and ride bikes, take public transit, and reduce our use of cars.

    #548395

    InnerCore
    Participant

    TaraK said:
    2) Location isn’t a decision you make just for the kid: you need to consider the whole family. Kids don’t benefit from parents having a long work commute or living in an area with no diversity either. School division can’t be the most impactful factor. Let’s choose a place where we’ll all be happy, have friends nearby, be safe, be able to walk and ride bikes, take public transit, and reduce our use of cars.

    This is what I have been seeing with my group of friends. We live in a very trendy urban area that is growing in popularity. As we and many people we know move into the phase of having kids most people I know have been stepping back and looking at it from more of a broader view than simply looking at school districts.

    After having a few conversations it appears that many of us today are a bit more selfish or at least have a different focus. In the past people WANTED to move to the suburbs. So since they already wanted to move to the suburbs and that’s where the better schools were there wasn’t really any conflict. However among most of my friends who now live in these urban areas, we’ve become accustomed to those areas and don’t really want to give up these things. So for example we, along with a few other couples have simply pushed back when we would have kids so we don’t have to make this choice. So most of friends in Columbus who live in the suburbs have kids in their mid 20’s while those of us in urban areas are planning on having kids in our early 30’s. This not only gives us more time to decide but allows us longer to wait and see how this trend shakes out and how it affects urban schools. We also have changed plans on how many kids. Originally my wife wanted 2 to 3 kids simply because that kind of the picturesque family you see. But now that the time to have kids is approaching you think where am I going to stick 2 or 3 kids when most of the housing in the urban areas are mostly 1 and 2 bedrooms. So now the plan is more like let’s have one kid and then take it from there.

    The other trend were seeing is people moving to urban suburban areas. So for example many of my friends in DC are moving from the city in areas like Dupont Circle to suburbs like Reston or Silver Springs. You gain the affordability and schools of the suburbs but you’re still close to a somewhat urban town center that still affords the walkability, shopping, nightlife that were used to. I’ll be very curious to see if we begin to do this in Columbus. The future plans for Dublin would be a good example. So while wouldn’t consider moving from an area like SN to an area like Lewis Center because we had kids, we would think about moving to an area like Dublin IF the plans they had for the area panned out.

    #548396

    News
    Participant

    Short North Parents Group Wants Better School Options
    Published on September 9, 2013 6:15 pm
    By: Miriam Bowers Abbott

    When making lists of family-friendly neighborhoods in Columbus, the Short North doesn’t usually make the cut. Although fabulous, the zone between OSU campus and Downtown is better known for funky art galleries, a crazed Halloween party, dining and drinking.

    A new group, Short North Parents, begs to differ. The group sees the neighborhood as one that is rich in opportunities for kids and families. In fact, when pressed, founding member Steven Mills rattles off a list that includes: Goodale Park, the Screen on the Green series, walking to Clippers and Blue Jackets games, walking to OSU games – and to the grocery: it’s all very walkable.

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/short-north-parents-group-wants-better-school-options-ma1

    #548397

    howatzer
    Participant

    ^I think the #1 thing to make SN more family friendly would be to make it easier for families with (especially little) kids to connect with other families with kids. The more other families you know, the more you’re likely to stay. This group could help a lot here. A suggestion: organize a kids-focused event at a SN playground/park. Can be as simple as a “come meet other SN families at the Harrison West playground” event – could rotate to different parks each weekend.

    #548399
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Just wanted to bump this back up:

    jchristy said:
    We’ve started a small, informal group called Short North Parents, http://www.shortnorthparents.com, to start gathering ideas and support for keeping more families in the area and improving schooling options. If anyone is interested it would be great if you could join our group and share any ideas that you have.

    Anne & I met with Jim, Steve and Robert last night (along with Cleve!) to chat about the information they’ve gathered so far and what types of ideas they have for making improvements. Lots of good discussion all around. Hope to see some exciting developments come out of this group!

    #548400

    kandrews
    Participant

    I’m curious to know how parents are feeling about their experiences with CCS at this point in the school year.

    As a new parent and being a graduate of CCS (Northland HS), I am definitely interested in having our daughter attend CCS for all the reasons that many have already shared. I am also interested in volunteering for CCS prior to my daughter starting. Does anyone have experience volunteering for their neighborhood school? If so, I’d love to hear about it. Not sure if they take random volunteers that are not parents of a CCS student or not.

    Also, I would love an update on the Short North Parents group? I signed up a while ago and haven’t heard anything about meetings or even online discussions.

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 106 total)

The forum ‘General Columbus Discussion’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Ring in the decade in style! Join us for an all-inclusive NYE celebration!

CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS & INFO