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Raising Kids in The City

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Raising Kids in The City

  • This topic has 105 replies, 38 voices, and was last updated 4 years ago by News.
Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 106 total)
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  • #548335

    howatzer
    Participant

    Just pulled the 2012-13 data for Fifth Ave. International from the Ohio Ed website. They only have data for grades 3+:

    Number of standards met 0/14
    Letter grade of standards met F
    Letter grade of performance index D
    Letter grade of Overall Value-Added F
    Letter grade of Gifted Value-Added C
    Letter grade of Disabled Value-Added C
    Letter grade of Lowest 20% Value-Added D
    Letter grade of AMO F

    The highest proficiency score,was 4th grade reading at 70.6%. The average proficiencies across grades are 58% for reading and 45% for math.

    Maybe the numbers don’t accurately reflect the school, particularly the younger grades, but they don’t support the classification as a “pretty decent” school, IMO.

    ETA: And looking at previous three year’s data, the trend in proficiencies is, if anything, to worse.

    #548336
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Yeah, still digesting what exactly this new scoring system means today, especially for lower grade levels that are not assessed with standardized testings.

    Certainly doesn’t paint a good picture overall for the student achievement levels of the current higher class levels.

    #548337

    howatzer
    Participant

    I can’t find the Oh Ed source they cite, but according to Greatschools.com, 5th Ave is _98%_ “economically disadvantaged” (I assume this means qualifying for free/discounted lunch). That seems crazy – it would that out of ~400 enrolled in the school, 8 aren’t “disadvantaged”. Could that actually be true?

    #548338

    stinkybomb
    Participant

    fensterbme – we must be sending our kindergarten aged kid to the same school.

    Our daughter starts school on Monday. Let me say it’s been a huge let down for me, up to this point. I’ve had to call 5 times in 2 weeks just to get an idea of what should be expected of me. We were given a supply list at an ice cream social, which I only learned about during one of the 5 calls. The teacher experience so far has been lack luster. Our teacher seems uninspired and beaten by a tough system. Not once has she offered any enthusiasm or the open arms warm and fuzzy feeling I was hoping that my daughter would receive.

    As for urban living, we love the proximity and exposure to city life for our kids. However we have major draw backs, guns, helicopters, occasional day hookers, petty theft and vandalism. Oh and drug deals, we have that too.

    With 2 kids, schools out way the cool factor of riding our bikes to the North Market. So the house is going on the market. Unfortunately for our daughter, it’s taken longer than expected to list and she’ll be in CCS for the year.

    #548339
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    howatzer said:
    I can’t find the Oh Ed source they cite, but according to Greatschools.com, 5th Ave is _98%_ “economically disadvantaged” (I assume this means qualifying for free/discounted lunch). That seems crazy – it would that out of ~400 enrolled in the school, 8 aren’t “disadvantaged”. Could that actually be true?

    That doesn’t sound right to me at all. But I’m not sure where that data is coming from or what it’s in reference to.

    #548340
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Some interesting info in the Dispatch article on this. Sounds like the new grading system isn’t just showing issues within CCS:

    ——————

    No Ohio school district got all A’s. None got all F’s, either. (Cleveland fared slightly worse than Columbus, earning six F’s, a D and two C’s.)

    But the new report cards show that lots of Ohio school districts that have been long-considered fantastic have some serious problems: There are certain groups of students they aren’t educating well.

    For example, the Heath school district in Licking County got an “excellent” rating last school year, equal to an A. On these new report cards, Heath earned five F grades — more than any other district in the region. Columbus City Schools, as Coleman pointed out, earned four F’s, three D’s and two C’s. In central Ohio, 21 of the 49 districts received at least one F grade.

    READ MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/public/2013/08/22/Columbus_earns_four_Fs_on_new_state_report_cards.html

    #548341

    gramarye
    Participant

    With respect to the schools, I also think that the urban parents five years from now will probably have many more options than those with children in or about to start in urban public school districts today. For example, even here in Akron (a much less developed urban tapestry than Columbus), we have the Akron Early College High School, the STEM Middle School, and the STEM High School, all of which are growing, not shrinking. Seats are allocated by lottery (I think these schools are prohibited from having competitive admissions), but there is clear demand for additional seats and they may well be able to expand over time so that there are seats there for everyone who wants to get in. Note that these schools are all very new. The high school still only has grades 9-10 because they will be adding one additional grade each year (as the inaugural class moves up).

    Distance learning is also likely to mature significantly (further) in the next 5-10 years.

    My wife and I are closing on our first home next week, and it’s still within the city limits, though not what I would call downtown. If we’re still here in 6+ years when our children are approaching school age, I think there will be better options than the standard neighborhood schools (which are, admittedly, a deterrent to families with other options).

    #548342

    For the 2011-2012 school year, it appears that Fifth Ave International had 368 economically disadvantaged students, and 26 who were not.

    Info courtesy
    http://bireports.education.ohio.gov/PublicDW/asp/Main.aspx?server=edumstrisp02&project=ReportCard&evt=3002&uid=guestILRC&pwd=&persist-mode=8

    You can probably find out all the other stuff you ever wanted to know there too. Very fun.

    #548343

    howatzer
    Participant

    Miriam Bowers Abbott said:
    For the 2011-2012 school year, it appears that Fifth Ave International had 368 economically disadvantaged students, and 26 who were not.

    Info courtesy
    http://bireports.education.ohio.gov/PublicDW/asp/Main.aspx?server=edumstrisp02&project=ReportCard&evt=3002&uid=guestILRC&pwd=&persist-mode=8

    You can probably find out all the other stuff you ever wanted to know there too. Very fun.

    So 93% “disadvantaged”. The 98% was cited at 2008 data, so I guess that’s an improvement…..

    That rate’s pretty surprising considering the house prices in the district boundaries.

    #548344

    pez
    Participant

    gramarye said:
    HEY NOW …

    Joev’s obviously never been to downtown Philadelphia…

    #548345

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    howatzer said:
    That rate’s pretty surprising considering the house prices in the district boundaries.

    I really don’t understand this either. Is 5th Avenue a neighborhood school or does it allow enrollment from anyone in the district?

    The only way I could see any majority amount of disadvantaged kids here at all given the boundary map is if most people with kids in the area opted for private school instead, and the remainder were filled from across the city. Would changing 5th Avenue to have more of a neighborhood focus like Southside STAY is working to accomplish with Stewart in GV be an attractive option for families in the area?

    ETA: If this school (in one of the best central city neighborhoods) is at 93%, what are schools like Weinland, Trevitt, Douglas, Ohio Ave etc at in regards to disadvantaged students? It has to be close to if not at 100%. That really speaks volumes as to the challenges which CCS is facing versus their suburban counterparts.

    #548346

    howatzer
    Participant

    heresthecasey said:
    ETA: If this school (in one of the best central city neighborhoods) is at 93%, what are schools like Weinland, Trevitt, Douglas, Ohio Ave etc at in regards to disadvantaged students?

    99%, 99%, 99% and 98%

    #548347

    Mike Hansen
    Participant

    heresthecasey That really speaks volumes as to the challenges which CCS is facing versus their suburban counterparts.

    Absolutely, the problem that CCS has is mainly the result of the 1% and low wages. Working people need higher wages so that they can raise their kids properly.

    #548348

    Analogue Kid
    Participant

    Walker said:
    Yeah, still digesting what exactly this new scoring system means today, especially for lower grade levels that are not assessed with standardized testings.

    Certainly doesn’t paint a good picture overall for the student achievement levels of the current higher class levels.

    I wouldn’t worry too much Walker. You’re involved in your kids education and care about success. That is SO important and schools can’t fix parents that either don’t care or don’t have the time/ability to get involved.

    #548349

    fensterbme
    Participant

    I’m totally with Stinkybomb… My wife and I have gone through all kinds of calls trying to get any information and it’s been horrible. We too went to an ice cream social event, that was not well planned and while I have heard some good things about the teacher generally and a strong PTA, the specific kindergarten teacher my daughter has doesn’t impress me and also seemed beaten down by the system.

    I think there are reasoned debates that can be had about how much of a gap there really is between Columbus Schools and the other suburban options, and that the quality of Columbus schools varies quite a bit… I don’t think there can be any real debate that overall options like Upper Arlington, Dublin, Olentangy, Worthington are on paper vastly better than Columbus. I know in talking with my coworkers who have their kids in the big name suburban school systems even though things aren’t perfect out there, they are vastly better than what kids in Columbus schools receive.

    I think the question I’d have for parents with school aged children are: Is living downtown and all the great things that come along with that worth the price of putting your children in an clearly sub-par educational system? For some parents, perhaps the costs keep them out of those school systems, but for a lot of upper income younger downtown residents they won’t hesitate to move back out to the burbs for good schools. If the city wants to retain families who are pretty north of the poverty line, they need a wholesale change up.

    Personally we are planning on putting our house up for sale in the coming year (hey if anyone is interested we have a great remodeled house in Westgate that will be for sale)… For us the education is of paramount importance for our kids, and easily trumps all of the stuff we love about living near downtown. We are going to try to stay as close as we can by looking hard at Upper Arlington, Bexley and Worthington.

    The whole thing is really painful, because *every* kid deserves to have a first rate educational experience, and IMO it’s one of the cheapest and best investments we can make as a society in our future.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 106 total)

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