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Public Transit Ridership at Highest Levels in Nearly 60 Years

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Public Transit Ridership at Highest Levels in Nearly 60 Years

Viewing 9 posts - 76 through 84 (of 84 total)
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  • #948951

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    Yes. That, and privately maintained roads by property owners. And privately run trains, buses… whatever the market would bear.

    That’s the ideal, anyway. Long way off, if it ever happens, so until then we’re bickering over how taxes are spent.

    I’m not sure the ideal is to destroy the economy. You realize that tolling all roads, while helping to actually pay for their costs, would have a huge negative. Businesses would suddenly have to budget a significant amount for any type of highway/road transport, and personal driving itself would plummet.

    #949007
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    You realize that tolling all roads, while helping to actually pay for their costs, would have a huge negative. Businesses would suddenly have to budget a significant amount for any type of highway/road transport, and personal driving itself would plummet.

    Businesses and people pay for roads now, just indirectly via taxes.

    Personal driving plummeting sounds like something you’d support, really. Think of all those customers for private rail and buses.

    Regardless, any such change is a long way off if it ever happens.

    #949125

    kit444
    Participant

    <DIV class=d4p-bbt-quote-title>jbcmh81 wrote:</DIV>
    <P>You realize that tolling all roads, while helping to actually pay for their costs, would have a huge negative. Businesses would suddenly have to budget a significant amount for any type of highway/road transport, and personal driving itself would plummet.</P>

    <P>Businesses and people pay for roads now, just indirectly via taxes. </P>

    But you don’t have to drop change in a meter every time you want to cross the street.

    #949174
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    But you don’t have to drop change in a meter every time you want to cross the street.

    Sure, one downside to the current system is it’s hard to realize how much you spend. Little here, little there, middle man takes a cut along the way…

    It’s not as if private roads don’t exist now.

    #949175
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Sorry to disrupt the “Rus wants stuff” thread, but I just heard that transit ridership is at its highest levels in nearly 60 years!

    Great news!

    #949177
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Sorry to disrupt the “Rus wants stuff” thread, but I just heard that transit ridership is at its highest levels in nearly 60 years!

    Great news!

    Just laughed!

    And to circle back, it’s still a very low percentage of the population. ;)

    #949411

    gramarye
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>rus wrote:</div>

    <DIV class=d4p-bbt-quote-title>In a perfect world there would be no public spending on roads, trains or any other transportation at all. </P>

    Wait, what? Would you turn every road into a toll?

    Actually, for what it’s worth, so would I. Or, more accurately, I would assess a weight-based VMT fee. There is no better potential counter to the excesses of suburban sprawl than internalizing those costs to the commuters who use those roads. Regulatory barriers are inefficient, ineffective, and static. Price-internalization measures are more inherently dynamic because consumers could still choose to live out in Granville and commute to Columbus … if it was actually worth it once they were actually expected to pay for the damage they do to our infrastructure by living so far out.

    #949765

    kit444
    Participant

    <DIV class=d4p-bbt-quote-title>kit444 wrote:</DIV>

    <P><div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>rus wrote:</div></P>

    <P><DIV class=d4p-bbt-quote-title>In a perfect world there would be no public spending on roads, trains or any other transportation at all. </P> </P>

    <P>Wait, what? Would you turn every road into a toll? </P>

    <P>Actually, for what it’s worth, so would I. Or, more accurately, I would assess a weight-based VMT fee. There is no better potential counter to the excesses of suburban sprawl than internalizing those costs to the commuters who use those roads. Regulatory barriers are inefficient, ineffective, and static. Price-internalization measures are more inherently dynamic because consumers <EM class=d4pbbc-italic>could still choose to live out in Granville and commute to Columbus … if it was actually worth it once they were actually expected to pay for the damage they do to our infrastructure by living so far out.</P>

    How would that work in practice? Is everyone required to report their mileage and vehicle size?

    ETA: I’m sorry my response posts look so mangled. I’m just hitting the Quote button. It must be the platform (IE 8) I’m using.

    #959964
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    ETA: I’m sorry my response posts look so mangled. I’m just hitting the Quote button. It must be the platform (IE 8) I’m using.

    No, the new quote function doesn’t drop older quotes. Working on fixing it.

Viewing 9 posts - 76 through 84 (of 84 total)

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