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Picking a place to buy a home in Columbus: 3 neighborhoods

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Picking a place to buy a home in Columbus: 3 neighborhoods

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Viewing 15 posts - 91 through 105 (of 113 total)
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  • #551125

    Analogue Kid
    Participant

    TaraK said:
    In all this talk of different areas, my husband says, “Before we buy somewhere, I’d like to talk to someone who’s lived there a long time.” To which I think, “Great, how do you find that person?”

    Any ideas? Or, alternatively, what kind of research did you do before buying in a new neighborhood? Aside from Googling crime stats, etc.

    What are his concerns? Annoying neighbors/barking dogs/Harley-Davidson club? Or something else?

    #551126

    TaraK
    Participant

    Analogue Kid said:
    What are his concerns? Annoying neighbors/barking dogs/Harley-Davidson club? Or something else?

    I’m really not sure. Maybe not concerns, so much as he wants to get an impression beforehand.

    #551127
    Anne Evans
    Anne Evans
    Keymaster

    rory said:
    Walked, biked and drove around neighborhoods a lot at all times of the day. You can also see people out and about while you’re doing it and ask them about the neighborhood.

    Agreed. Walk around and take photos of houses for sale and someone will probably say hello.

    #551128
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    TaraK said:
    In all this talk of different areas, my husband says, “Before we buy somewhere, I’d like to talk to someone who’s lived there a long time.” To which I think, “Great, how do you find that person?”

    Just one thing… I’d recommend talking to multiple people in each neighborhood. You’re likely to find long-time residents with vastly different experiences and opinions in every single neighborhood.

    #551129
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    Bexley in no way disappoints.

    The Barrel 44 there just closed, although it sucked anyways.

    #551130

    Patch
    Participant

    TaraK said:
    I’m really not sure. Maybe not concerns, so much as he wants to get an impression beforehand.

    What about Schools? Is that a bigger concern than the, say, size of a house? Or large garage/backyard?

    We just popped out our second kid, and if we moved anywhere it would be south bexley. the schools are outstanding, and kids are ALWAYS out riding their bikes. we have friend that live their and love it.

    but really, why are you leaving the Shoe???

    PM me if you feel like it.

    #551131

    TaraK
    Participant

    Patch said:
    What about Schools? Is that a bigger concern than the, say, size of a house? Or large garage/backyard?

    We just popped out our second kid, and if we moved anywhere it would be south bexley. the schools are outstanding, and kids are ALWAYS out riding their bikes. we have friend that live their and love it.

    but really, why are you leaving the Shoe???

    PM me if you feel like it.

    No kids yet; potential there. And schools aren’t a huge concern. We’re both educators. And we’re primarily concerned with their education after 7th grade, at which point we could be in a different house. (Again, because hypothetical kid doesn’t exist yet.)

    Yard and garage aren’t a huge concern. I’m only interested in yards if they’re sunny and fertile enough to garden. Otherwise, bleh. We’re hoping to be a one-car household, so a massive garage isn’t needed. A decent, good house in a relatively safe urban area for a decent price — them’s the priorities.

    #551132
    JoePeffer
    JoePeffer
    Participant

    TaraK said:
    Yesterday we drove to Bexley and checked out the location of a couple of homes. ….But I was surprised yesterday to note how much the area has changed in the past couple of years. I.e. more restaurants and shops in walking distance on Main St.

    –I have heard that Tasi is opening a 2nd location in the recent Grinders spot on Main street. That will be a welcome addition to the neighborhood–and with a patio.

    #551133

    TaraK
    Participant

    Q: Those of you who have gone from renting to owning home (or who have moved from a smaller home to a slightly larger), how much has it affected your utilities?

    I know estimating would be difficult based on stats alone, but the place we rent is approx. 980 ft, while we’re looking to buy something closer to 1300-1500. But then there’s windows, insulation, appliance updates …

    So screw trying to calculate. What’ve your experiences been?

    #551134

    myliftkk
    Participant

    It’s more about function than volume.

    Renting the side of a 3-story duplex in Schumacher Place, ridiculous heating/cooling bills because the landlord removed and refinished all the trim and windows and then resealed nothing when they put it back, leading to essentially a forever draft and a kitchen built over a crawlspace. $300-400/mo heating bills in the winter, and ran two window units, 1 per upper floor, plus central air, in the summer.

    Renting a 2-story home in Harrison West with no attic (that’s about 1500-1700sqft), with vinyl windows/doors, but also a cellar instead of a basement. I pay $50/mo for gas heat throughout the year and that usually builds up enough credit to cover the winter for all but maybe two months (mild winters, it’s more than enough).

    Appliances beyond an old furnace are going to have a marignal effect on utilities.

    Windows/door/basement are your primary driver of heating/cooling costs. Check for decent air return to the furnace/CA (should come ideally from the center or similar location in the upper floor). Check for double pane vinyl windows and doors that seal. Basements should generally have leaks sealed by insluation tape at a minimum, but that’s a relatively cheap fix.

    Power costs beyond AC really just depend on how many pieces of electronics you have running 24/7/365. An Central AC unit that has to run 24/7, is going to add a couple bucks a day to your power bill. To the extent you can keep a home stable at 68 in the winter, and 73 in the summer with the AC cycled off more than on, you’ll have reasonable power bills except for maybe the worst summer month.

    #551135

    ExileOn6thSt
    Participant

    My experience has been that things like windows, insulation, and appliances have a more significant impact sometimes than size. I went from an apartment that was less than 1000 sq ft to a house at around 2500 sq ft. The apartment had terrible insulation and windows; but the house was a total rehab, so it had all new windows and insulation. Even with the big jump in size, my utility bills have remarkably remained about the same.

    #551136

    maveric1
    Participant

    Went from 600SF studio condo unit on 2nd floor to a house about 2,500SF. My condo was about $60-70 (electric & gas) during summer and winter. My electric/gas has been about $55 more. House was built 9 years ago.

    #551137

    TaraK
    Participant

    Good to know. And I assume that the lower you keep your temps in the winter, the less variable per sqf. It’s probably worth noting that a significant portion of our bill now is the connection/distribution charge, and that won’t flux.

    #551138

    myliftkk
    Participant

    TaraK said:
    Good to know. And I assume that the lower you keep your temps in the winter, the less variable per sqf. It’s probably worth noting that a significant portion of our bill now is the connection/distribution charge, and that won’t flux.

    There’s a floor on how much lower temp you can keep a home in the winter and reasonbly expect to live in it, or warm it up when needed. 68 is generally the recommended temperature for maximum heating efficiency, iirc.

    With a variable usage component that spikes in the winter, I find it’s smarter simply to average the costs out throughtout the year since utility companies will generally let you carry a credit balance without an issue. That way you don’t get used to $17/mo bills in the summer and get a $175/mo in the winter.

    #551139

    ricospaz
    Participant

    Good insulated windows can really affect your bills in a positive way. I have a 2,000 sqr foot house with two furnaces and two A/C units, yet gas bills are $150 in the dead of winter at most and my highest electric bill in the last year was August’s, at about $134.

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