Our City Online

Messageboard - General Columbus Discussion

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

Pedestrians Struck By Vehicles on the rise in Columbus

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Pedestrians Struck By Vehicles on the rise in Columbus

  • This topic has 40 replies, 20 voices, and was last updated 6 years ago by Bear.
Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 41 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1046801

    Lu
    Participant

    I think it has far more to do with driver culture and lack of enforcement rather than environmental design. I often use a well-marked crosswalk with large yield signs and flashing lights (what I would consider to be ideal environmental design) and cars never yield, even when I’m halfway across the road.

    I lived for several years in DC, and drivers there would almost always yield to pedestrians, even in unmarked crosswalks.

    #1046802
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    It’s hard to look both ways and look for Facebook notifications at the same time.

    #1046808
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    I think it has far more to do with driver culture and lack of enforcement rather than environmental design.

    Yes, the driver culture is bad, but it’s the poorly built environment that is the cause of that. You can’t give enough tickets to change the culture and enforce your way out of the problem. Roads need narrowed. Period.

    I often use a well-marked crosswalk with large yield signs and flashing lights (what I would consider to be ideal environmental design) and cars never yield, even when I’m halfway across the road.

    There are crossings like that on Long Street (if that’s not what you’re referring to) and drivers don’t yield. It’s because the street is built like a highway… four lanes wide, and wide 11-to-12-foot lanes that tell drivers visually that they should be going 40-45mph. That is not a yielding speed. Meanwhile, on Gay Street, I have drivers who will slow down and wave me across as a pedestrian mid-block *without* a crosswalk because the streets are narrow, they’re only going 15-20 mph, and they feel more accommodating to pedestrians in that environment.

    I lived for several years in DC, and drivers there would almost always yield to pedestrians, even in unmarked crosswalks.

    Wait, are you talking about *Washington* DC? The city often ranked with the worst drivers in the country?

    http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2013/07/which_city_has_the_worst_drivers_boston_baltimore_washington_d_c_miami.html

    Perhaps you had a positive personal experience there, but it sounds like it’s the exception more than the rule. I was there on vacation last year, and we saw nothing but fast-moving, jammed-up, angry traffic. More constant car horns honking that I remember on my last trip to NYC. We were very careful and alert in crosswalks, as many right-turn-on-red drivers did their best to squeeze between pedestrians if they thought they had a foot or two of clearance. It was kinda crazy.

    #1046811

    CB_downtowner
    Participant

    I can’t tell you how many people I almost hit every week, either when driving or biking, simply because barely anyone looks both ways before they cross the street anymore.

    Yup. Walking in much of downtown Columbus is dipping your toes in the water. Dip one toe on the street, watch how the driver reacts, and in 75% of the cases expect that drivers are going to pretend you’re not there. Crosswalks on 3rd and 4th are like playing Frogger, even if you’re careful and too often I see tentative people waiting for drivers to let them go — that’s backwards. Walk signs SHOULD be pedestrian right-of-way, but drivers too often don’t feel that way.

    #1046813

    hometown
    Participant

    I’m so glad to read such a lively discussion. Here’s my two cents worth. I’ve been a transportational walker for many, many years and have pretty much experienced it all: getting chased by an angry pickup driver after inadvertently tapping his truck with my umbrella as he clipped me in an intersection (note to self: keep umbrellas in day-pack at all times), being cussed out for not understanding that a Mercedes Benz always has the right of way no matter what the light says, watching a young mother with a stroller being forced onto a busy street because there were no sidewalks and, sadly, getting honked at in crosswalks just for being there. The jay-walking enforcement angle makes me sigh. Yup, there are and always will be teenagers with an attitude who want to play chicken in traffic. But recent experiences have enticed even this old bird into crossing the road. Construction along High Street routinely closes sidewalks without alerting walkers at the closest intersections with cross walks. This often means either backtracking a couple blocks or doing the jaywalk dance. People who mostly use their cars to get around think of walking as something done for pleasure, not for actually getting somewhere. Infrastructure reflects the fact that pedestrians are not understood as part of the traffic stream.

    #1046814

    Coy
    Participant

    Pedestrians in Columbus seem to not even consider looking both ways before crossing the street (more important to check phone while stepping off into traffic), and on campus the walk/don’t walk crossing signs are nearly completely ignored (i.e. College at 12th).

    Flip side, drivers in Cbus can be extremely distracted and aggressive (sometimes at the same time), and it also gets even worse around campus. I wrecked my bike avoiding a distracted driver at 12th and Pearl last year.

    To me, pedestrians in Cbus assume drivers are paying attention to them but pay zero attention themselves, and drivers in Cbus assume that everything not getting them A to B as fast as humanly possible is a problem, not a right.

    #1046851

    drew
    Participant

    To me, pedestrians in Cbus assume drivers are paying attention to them but pay zero attention themselves, and drivers in Cbus assume that everything not getting them A to B as fast as humanly possible is a problem, not a right.

    That sounds about right to me.

    #1046861

    James Ragland
    Participant

    It’s a completely different issue in my neighborhood. Perfectly good sidewalk five feet from you; however you and your group insist on walking four or five across in the middle of the street. If I pull up slowly behind you, you still don’t move. If I blow my horn, I may face consequences. It’s troubling.

    #1046869

    drew
    Participant

    It’s a completely different issue in my neighborhood. Perfectly good sidewalk five feet from you; however you and your group insist on walking four or five across in the middle of the street. If I pull up slowly behind you, you still don’t move. If I blow my horn, I may face consequences. It’s troubling.

    This is frustrating. I saw two women pushing strollers down the middle of the street a couple of days ago, with 6′ wide sidewalks on either side. I couldn’t imagine why.

    #1046870

    jackoh
    Participant

    Here’s one circumstance that I encounter frequently: a runner running in the street(where there is a sidewalk right next to him/her)- after the sun has set- dressed in dark running clothes. Why do they do that?

    #1046879

    FunkBrothers
    Participant

    I think Columbus needs to implement its own version of Vision Zero that New York City and Sweden has done. This is something that Mayor Coleman ought bring forth to the city as a reaction to the increase.

    I wonder if there has been an increase in the number of pedestrians struck along Neil Avenue when the speed limits were raised.

    #1046890

    hometown
    Participant

    ere’s one circumstance that I encounter frequently: a runner running in the street(where there is a sidewalk right next to him/her)- after the sun has set- dressed in dark running clothes. Why do they do that?

    I have seen this too, especially along Third Ave around Grandview. I’ve also even seen people running on the berm on Rt 23, near Delaware. It’s puzzling to see people deliberately making themselves more vulnerable in an already dicey situation so I’m hoping a runner will pipe up. In the meantime, here is a guess about why somebody might choose this option. Footing is less sure on sidewalks which are more likely to be broken, rough, uncertain and poorly lit. Streets designed for cars are more likely to be straight, smooth, predictable and well lit. Potholes get fixed. Sidewalks can languish for years.

    #1046893

    Lu
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Lu wrote:</div>
    I lived for several years in DC, and drivers there would almost always yield to pedestrians, even in unmarked crosswalks.

    Wait, are you talking about *Washington* DC? The city often ranked with the worst drivers in the country?

    http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2013/07/which_city_has_the_worst_drivers_boston_baltimore_washington_d_c_miami.html

    Perhaps you had a positive personal experience there, but it sounds like it’s the exception more than the rule.

    Yep, Washington, DC, one of the three safest cities in the country for pedestrians. When I moved here from DC, two things stood out more than anything: 1. people here are much friendlier, and 2. being a pedestrian here is a lot more dangerous.

    #1046898

    JeepGirl
    Participant

    Meanwhile, on Gay Street, I have drivers who will slow down and wave me across as a pedestrian mid-block *without* a crosswalk because the streets are narrow, they’re only going 15-20 mph, and they feel more accommodating to pedestrians in that environment.

    So it’s Ok to illegally jaywalk as long as a driver waves you across one lane of the street? Meanwhile, drivers traveling behind or from the other direction simply see another pedestrian crossing in front of oncoming traffic mid-block and the perpetual pedestrian vs driver war is fed yet again.

    Nice

    #1046901
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    So it’s Ok to illegally jaywalk as long as a driver waves you across one lane of the street?

    I didn’t say it was ok.

    Though if you park your Jeep at a meter mid-block and your destination is directly across Gay Street, do you walk all the way to a crosswalk to cross? I doubt it.

    …perpetual pedestrian vs driver war is fed yet again.

    But what else would you have to talk about if it ended? ;)

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 41 total)

The forum ‘General Columbus Discussion’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Subscribe to the Columbus Underground YouTube channel for exclusive interviews and news updates!

CLICK HERE TO SUBSCRIBE