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Parking Garage Condemned on Long Street

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Parking Garage Condemned on Long Street

Viewing 15 posts - 151 through 165 (of 169 total)
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  • #1109885
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Ohio residency requires a car for 99.9999% of residents.

    Not sure if you’re referring to Ohio in general or Columbus, but that number is certainly an exaggeration for Columbus. The vast majority of the student body at OSU do not require cars for their residency at college. There’s plenty of other people who manage to get by without cars as well:

    https://www.columbusunderground.com/car-free-in-columbus-part-1-getting-started

    https://www.columbusunderground.com/car-free-in-columbus-part-2-getting-around

    https://www.columbusunderground.com/car-free-in-columbus-part-3-the-challenges

    https://www.columbusunderground.com/car-free-in-columbus-part-4-the-long-haul

    I can understand if some people want to change that mindset. If they do, get public transit fixed. That would be the first thing.

    Sure, public transit has a long way to go, but there have been a lot of improvements in the past decade as well. Not to mention car2go, CoGo, Uber, and the large amount of bike infrastructure put in place. Personally speaking, I was not a bike rider a couple of years ago, but CoGo got me trying it out, and now Anne and I commute by bike almost every day, even when it’s been in the 20s in the past week. We’re not 100% car-free, but it’s very easy to be car-lite in Columbus.

    Side note: Those Neighborhood watch units are a) horrible overpriced and b) the people who seem to get their hands on one seems to “know about it” before everyone else does, which is typical for this type of housing.

    When a product or service is “overpriced” that means that it’s so expensive that no one (or few people) buy it. My understanding with the Neighborhood Launch condos is that they’ve sold very quickly, even if they are on the expensive side of the spectrum. And the lack of “knowing about it” part comes from the fact that they’ve pre-sold prior to the completion of construction, therefore, they’re never generally advertised. If you’re interested in buying one, you should probably stop by their leasing office, find out about the next set, and put in a deposit early. I think they’ll take anyone’s money who’s interested. It’s not a secret society over there.

    #1109914

    indyout
    Participant

    I checked out this garage today, just to see how it actually is. It reminds me of most of the garages in Pittsburgh, old ugly and crumbling! If I still had a car, I would not park in this one.

    #1109937

    JAL
    Participant

    I see that they have plastic up covering the opening of the upper floors on the north side of the Long St parking deck. Looks like they may be beginning to start working on it.

    #1109965

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>MichaelC wrote:</div>
    That piece, RobertsD, is one thing about Neighborhood Launch that folks really like.

    Columbus is not a large city like New York or LA where they can get away with a garage two blocks away or even no car. Ohio residency requires a car for 99.9999% of residents. I can understand if some people want to change that mindset. If they do, get public transit fixed. That would be the first thing. Not reducing parking on purpose in the hopes people will stop driving. That will drive suburb growth.

    Side note: Those Neighborhood watch units are a) horrible overpriced and b) the people who seem to get their hands on one seems to “know about it” before everyone else does, which is typical for this type of housing.

    I really can’t stand when people say something like, “Well we’re not NYC” as an excuse to dismiss pushing for better urban development. It is almost a cliché at this point. In Downtown you have access to bus lines, bike share, taxis and car share. It is a total lie to suggest that anyone living Downtown would simply be unable to function without personally owning a car. Everyone’s circumstances are different. There are many who could not do it, but there are many who could, and the urban environment really shouldn’t be built for people who like car-centric suburban development patterns.

    #1109982

    Robertsd937
    Participant

    Walker and JBC….I have lived in 4 states and 10 cities, if you’ve seen one you’ve pretty much seen them all. I was referring to Ohio in general about requiring a car, not just Columbus. But unless you live on the East Coast, between Boston and just north of the southern border in Virginia (near Newport) you need a car, period. I have seen your links on “car free in Columbus” and yeah, it’s cute and honestly not practical for the majority with household consisting of Husband, Wife, and 2.5 kids. It requires lifestyle adjustments but the masses aren’t going to do that.

    “the urban environment really shouldn’t be built for people who like car-centric suburban development patterns.”

    You know, you are wrong here and here is why. Development is MARKET DRIVEN. If people want a high dollar condo in an urban area (by the way, the suburbs are urban…the exburbs…..ehhhh…..) and they are surrounded by car centric state I think a car will be required by almost all of those buyers. The city passing an ordinance banning parking garages will not fly. They tried that stunt in Houston back in 90s and 2000s and they ended up removing it. Even in hardcore liberal Seattle, they aren’t that stupid. Although they add another car to the train no one rides and add more bike lanes (which they should add here….separate issue though).

    The way to solve this problem is with rail and it has to be developed as to where I can walk out of my house and get to the airport or downtown or pretty much where I need to go. It’s not just a matter of “if they build it they will come”. Detroit as proven that to be a failure with their rail. People need to sit down and engineer the thing correctly.

    “It is a total lie to suggest that anyone living Downtown would simply be unable to function without personally owning a car.”

    I disagree….at least at this stage. Perhaps in the future when urban transit more functional but today…no. If I lived downtown I would be still driving, even if it’s a few blocks. I do not think I am in the minority there either.

    #1109986
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    …the majority with household consisting of Husband, Wife, and 2.5 kids. It requires lifestyle adjustments but the masses aren’t going to do that.

    You’re incorrect here, at least by today’s standards. “The masses” right now are Millennials and Baby Boomers, which make up the largest two US demographics (each with a population of around 75 million), which generally have no kids in the household and are more likely to be looking for those smaller rentals with in walkable neighborhoods in droves (which is driving demand all over the US).

    Generation X is your current “Husband, Wife, and 2.5 kids” demographic and they’re the smallest of the three with 66 million:

    http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/01/16/this-year-millennials-will-overtake-baby-boomers/

    I’m happy that you’ve lived in 10 cities in the past (congrats!), but your personal experiences of yesteryear do not reflect current or future trends.

    #1109988
    dalias
    dalias
    Participant

    . If I lived downtown I would be still driving, even if it’s a few blocks. I do not think I am in the minority there either.

    It is kind of hard to argue with the declaration “I am completely lazy” and I bet everyone else is!

    #1110005

    Robertsd937
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Robertsd937 wrote:</div>
    …the majority with household consisting of Husband, Wife, and 2.5 kids. It requires lifestyle adjustments but the masses aren’t going to do that.

    You’re incorrect here, at least by today’s standards. “The masses” right now are Millennials and Baby Boomers, which make up the largest two US demographics (each with a population of around 75 million), which generally have no kids in the household and are more likely to be looking for those smaller rentals with in walkable neighborhoods in droves (which is driving demand all over the US).

    Generation X is your current “Husband, Wife, and 2.5 kids” demographic and they’re the smallest of the three with 66 million:

    http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/01/16/this-year-millennials-will-overtake-baby-boomers/

    I’m happy that you’ve lived in 10 cities in the past (congrats!), but your personal experiences of yesteryear do not reflect current or future trends.

    Oh I agree I am definitely part of “generation screwed….err….X”. Current trends for boomers have them retiring and dying at some point and Millennials not driving or owning anything because they are pretty much worthless as a generation. That and they seem to be communists for some odd reason. So much for American values. Historians will look at Millennials and see them as the reason for the fall of human race, but I digress. :)

    But you might be on to something there…should millennials and Gen Y/Z be even allowed to drive cars? Maybe we do force them into the “stack and pack” housing and not let them out of the cities. Taking away their access to cars will restrict their mobility and they could can do less damage. Of course I am being somewhat sarcastic….being as part of the generation who is covering their bills, as well as the Boomers. If our plan to make sure these people never get into a car and drive out to where people like us live, we need to get COTA’s act together! :)

    #1110007

    Robertsd937
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Robertsd937 wrote:</div>
    . If I lived downtown I would be still driving, even if it’s a few blocks. I do not think I am in the minority there either.

    It is kind of hard to argue with the declaration “I am completely lazy” and I bet everyone else is!

    It’s not just lazy, it’s being aware of ones’ personal safety. For more safety options google “CCL” or “open carry”.

    #1110161

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    Walker and JBC….I have lived in 4 states and 10 cities, if you’ve seen one you’ve pretty much seen them all. I was referring to Ohio in general about requiring a car, not just Columbus. But unless you live on the East Coast, between Boston and just north of the southern border in Virginia (near Newport) you need a car, period. I have seen your links on “car free in Columbus” and yeah, it’s cute and honestly not practical for the majority with household consisting of Husband, Wife, and 2.5 kids. It requires lifestyle adjustments but the masses aren’t going to do that.

    “the urban environment really shouldn’t be built for people who like car-centric suburban development patterns.”

    You know, you are wrong here and here is why. Development is MARKET DRIVEN. If people want a high dollar condo in an urban area (by the way, the suburbs are urban…the exburbs…..ehhhh…..) and they are surrounded by car centric state I think a car will be required by almost all of those buyers. The city passing an ordinance banning parking garages will not fly. They tried that stunt in Houston back in 90s and 2000s and they ended up removing it. Even in hardcore liberal Seattle, they aren’t that stupid. Although they add another car to the train no one rides and add more bike lanes (which they should add here….separate issue though).

    The way to solve this problem is with rail and it has to be developed as to where I can walk out of my house and get to the airport or downtown or pretty much where I need to go. It’s not just a matter of “if they build it they will come”. Detroit as proven that to be a failure with their rail. People need to sit down and engineer the thing correctly.

    “It is a total lie to suggest that anyone living Downtown would simply be unable to function without personally owning a car.”

    I disagree….at least at this stage. Perhaps in the future when urban transit more functional but today…no. If I lived downtown I would be still driving, even if it’s a few blocks. I do not think I am in the minority there either.

    First of all, it goes without saying that urban living is not for everyone. That is why a multitude of different living environments exist. Those who absolutely want to drive everywhere are probably not going to be the target demographics that urban living attracts, but nor are they being excluded if there is not a surface lot or garage on every single block or included in every single project. Lifestyle adjustments are not forced on anyone. No one has to move Downtown, so I really don’t get your logic here.

    Second, you assume that development being market driven equates to everyone desiring the exact same type of development, which is total nonsense. I grew up in a cul-de-sac in the suburbs, but for most of my adult life, I have lived in an urban environment. I have absolutely no desire to live in the suburbs again, and I have absolutely no desire to be in a position in which driving everywhere is an absolute necessity. I am far from the only person who feels that way. I like biking, I like walking. I’m healthier for it, and I get to see neighborhoods up close rather than flying past my windshield.

    I agree that there needs to be better transit in Columbus, and that has been debated ad nauseam. However, not having rail does not mean there are no options currently.

    If you feel the need to drive just a few blocks each and every time, you’re definitely not the demographic that would ever move Downtown. I mean, how lazy can people be.

    #1110162

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Walker Evans wrote:</div>

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Robertsd937 wrote:</div><br>
    …the majority with household consisting of Husband, Wife, and 2.5 kids. It requires lifestyle adjustments but the masses aren’t going to do that.

    You’re incorrect here, at least by today’s standards. “The masses” right now are Millennials and Baby Boomers, which make up the largest two US demographics (each with a population of around 75 million), which generally have no kids in the household and are more likely to be looking for those smaller rentals with in walkable neighborhoods in droves (which is driving demand all over the US).

    Generation X is your current “Husband, Wife, and 2.5 kids” demographic and they’re the smallest of the three with 66 million:

    http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/01/16/this-year-millennials-will-overtake-baby-boomers/

    I’m happy that you’ve lived in 10 cities in the past (congrats!), but your personal experiences of yesteryear do not reflect current or future trends.

    Oh I agree I am definitely part of “generation screwed….err….X”. Current trends for boomers have them retiring and dying at some point and Millennials not driving or owning anything because they are pretty much worthless as a generation. That and they seem to be communists for some odd reason. So much for American values. Historians will look at Millennials and see them as the reason for the fall of human race, but I digress. :)

    But you might be on to something there…should millennials and Gen Y/Z be even allowed to drive cars? Maybe we do force them into the “stack and pack” housing and not let them out of the cities. Taking away their access to cars will restrict their mobility and they could can do less damage. Of course I am being somewhat sarcastic….being as part of the generation who is covering their bills, as well as the Boomers. If our plan to make sure these people never get into a car and drive out to where people like us live, we need to get COTA’s act together! :)

    You sound like a crotchety old man who doesn’t understand those damn kids anymore. Let me know when Millennials are the ones crashing the economy, because I am pretty sure it wasn’t them, but they will be paying for those mistakes long into the future.

    #1110171
    _calebross
    _calebross
    Participant

    Oh I agree I am definitely part of “generation screwed….err….X”. Current trends for boomers have them retiring and dying at some point and Millennials not driving or owning anything because they are pretty much worthless as a generation. That and they seem to be communists for some odd reason. So much for American values. Historians will look at Millennials and see them as the reason for the fall of human race, but I digress. :)

    But you might be on to something there…should millennials and Gen Y/Z be even allowed to drive cars? Maybe we do force them into the “stack and pack” housing and not let them out of the cities. Taking away their access to cars will restrict their mobility and they could can do less damage. Of course I am being somewhat sarcastic….being as part of the generation who is covering their bills, as well as the Boomers. If our plan to make sure these people never get into a car and drive out to where people like us live, we need to get COTA’s act together! :)

    Wait, I’m a communist? Didn’t get the memo.

    On the other hand, stop generalizing a generation when we could all easily generalize yours as the generation who truly ruined America, but we won’t go that far. I don’t own anything because I choose not to, not because I can’t.

    #1110173

    ImNotaStar
    Participant

    Walker and JBC….I have lived in 4 states and 10 cities, if you’ve seen one you’ve pretty much seen them all. I was referring to Ohio in general about requiring a car, not just Columbus. But unless you live on the East Coast, between Boston and just north of the southern border in Virginia (near Newport) you need a car, period. I have seen your links on “car free in Columbus” and yeah, it’s cute and honestly not practical for the majority with household consisting of Husband, Wife, and 2.5 kids. It requires lifestyle adjustments but the masses aren’t going to do that.

    “the urban environment really shouldn’t be built for people who like car-centric suburban development patterns.”

    You know, you are wrong here and here is why. Development is MARKET DRIVEN. If people want a high dollar condo in an urban area (by the way, the suburbs are urban…the exburbs…..ehhhh…..) and they are surrounded by car centric state I think a car will be required by almost all of those buyers. The city passing an ordinance banning parking garages will not fly. They tried that stunt in Houston back in 90s and 2000s and they ended up removing it. Even in hardcore liberal Seattle, they aren’t that stupid. Although they add another car to the train no one rides and add more bike lanes (which they should add here….separate issue though).

    The way to solve this problem is with rail and it has to be developed as to where I can walk out of my house and get to the airport or downtown or pretty much where I need to go. It’s not just a matter of “if they build it they will come”. Detroit as proven that to be a failure with their rail. People need to sit down and engineer the thing correctly.

    “It is a total lie to suggest that anyone living Downtown would simply be unable to function without personally owning a car.”

    I disagree….at least at this stage. Perhaps in the future when urban transit more functional but today…no. If I lived downtown I would be still driving, even if it’s a few blocks. I do not think I am in the minority there either.

    +1 Most of these people are scared to go east of Cleveland. If you are really into urbanism, why aren’t you in NYC in the first place?

    #1110177

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Robertsd937 wrote:</div>
    Walker and JBC….I have lived in 4 states and 10 cities, if you’ve seen one you’ve pretty much seen them all. I was referring to Ohio in general about requiring a car, not just Columbus. But unless you live on the East Coast, between Boston and just north of the southern border in Virginia (near Newport) you need a car, period. I have seen your links on “car free in Columbus” and yeah, it’s cute and honestly not practical for the majority with household consisting of Husband, Wife, and 2.5 kids. It requires lifestyle adjustments but the masses aren’t going to do that.

    “the urban environment really shouldn’t be built for people who like car-centric suburban development patterns.”

    You know, you are wrong here and here is why. Development is MARKET DRIVEN. If people want a high dollar condo in an urban area (by the way, the suburbs are urban…the exburbs…..ehhhh…..) and they are surrounded by car centric state I think a car will be required by almost all of those buyers. The city passing an ordinance banning parking garages will not fly. They tried that stunt in Houston back in 90s and 2000s and they ended up removing it. Even in hardcore liberal Seattle, they aren’t that stupid. Although they add another car to the train no one rides and add more bike lanes (which they should add here….separate issue though).

    The way to solve this problem is with rail and it has to be developed as to where I can walk out of my house and get to the airport or downtown or pretty much where I need to go. It’s not just a matter of “if they build it they will come”. Detroit as proven that to be a failure with their rail. People need to sit down and engineer the thing correctly.

    “It is a total lie to suggest that anyone living Downtown would simply be unable to function without personally owning a car.”

    I disagree….at least at this stage. Perhaps in the future when urban transit more functional but today…no. If I lived downtown I would be still driving, even if it’s a few blocks. I do not think I am in the minority there either.

    +1 Most of these people are scared to go east of Cleveland. If you are really into urbanism, why aren’t you in NYC in the first place?

    NYC is hardly the only place you can find urban living, but on top of that, the cost of living is going to be a big hurdle for most people.

    #1110204

    ImNotaStar
    Participant

    LOL

Viewing 15 posts - 151 through 165 (of 169 total)

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