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Open Container Entertainment Districts

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Open Container Entertainment Districts

  • This topic has 244 replies, 66 voices, and was last updated 6 years ago by News.
Viewing 15 posts - 136 through 150 (of 245 total)
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  • #541140

    DavidF
    Participant

    I miss swagger and indie arts capital.

    #541141

    billbix
    Member

    buckette13 said:
    Now that people are getting wise to them, the Cycle Tavern is going to have to get more creative:

    Just spit my coffee out picturing it.

    #541142

    myliftkk
    Participant

    jbcmh81 said:
    I never stated that “bums” have some kind of value to the SN. I do think it’s kind of illogical and ridiculous to expect their population to suddenly increase with open container. Being homeless/broke doesn’t exactly spell out the kind of demographic that would be patronizing businesses on High Street. If they don’t now, they’re not going to just because they can carry a beer legally on the street.

    Your fears are overblown and unlikely to ever be realized.

    They already patronize places on High because you realize you can buy more than Chardonnay in the mile stretch that defines the SN? Most don’t stick around to drink it now because there’s very little tolerance for it throughout the entire district any longer. There’s way more cons than pros for a district like the SN, especially since it’s not like the SN has any problem attracting new investment (and not of the $1 shot window bars type). Open container policy is a gimmick that the SN frankly doesn’t need.

    Unlikely to be realized, sure, since dealing with many of the commercial property owners in the district, I’m not out on a limb saying they’ll never support a change like that.

    #541143

    jackoh
    Participant

    myliftkk said:
    They already patronize places on High because you realize you can buy more than Chardonnay in the mile stretch that defines the SN? Most don’t stick around to drink it now because there’s very little tolerance for it throughout the entire district any longer. There’s way more cons than pros for a district like the SN, especially since it’s not like the SN has any problem attracting new investment (and not of the $1 shot window bars type). Open container policy is a gimmick that the SN frankly doesn’t need.

    Unlikely to be realized, sure, since dealing with many of the commercial property owners in the district, I’m not out on a limb saying they’ll never support a change like that.

    Would they support voting the SN dry?

    #541144

    drew
    Participant

    jackoh said:
    Would they support voting the SN dry?

    And the award for most nonsensical comment on this thread goes to…

    Edited to add: It’s well earned, there’s been stiff competition!

    #541145

    jackoh
    Participant

    drew said:
    And the award for most nonsensical comment on this thread goes to…

    Edited to add: It’s well earned, there’s been stiff competition!

    You are absolutely correct in your assessment. Of course, the comment was designed to be precisely that. What puzzles me is that if the consumption of alcohol in the confines of the SN causes significant problems for the residents there, why don’t they deal directly with the issue and eliminate the cause. (Actually the residents wouldn’t stand a chance in the face of the commercial interests along High st. and Park st.) But, in spite of all the complaining, they don’t want to eliminate drinking in the SN, they just want it to be confined to the “right” people. And, god help us, a designation as an open container entertainment district might bring “undesirable” drinkers into the area. Quite frankly, this sort of small time elitism bothers me. The amount of pearl clutching in this thread is a bit much.

    #541146

    mrpoppinzs
    Member

    A “Dry” Olde Towne East Improves Quality Of Life, Residents Say

    November 12, 2012

    The beauty and elegance of Olde Towne East is clearly evident among the homes along East Broad Street. But travel south a few blocks to East Main Street and that elegance is gone. Residents say the deterioration of that part of Olde Towne East was fueled in part by the presence of small convenience stores.

    “We had a proliferation of what we would call corner carryouts,” says Kathy Webb, captain of the local block watch. “Their primary business was to sell to the lowest economically disadvantaged. We just had way too many carryouts and just far too much availability of alcohol.”

    Resident Mike Moore called carryout owners irresponsible. They would do anything, he says, to make a fast buck. Their clientele continually disrupted life in Olde Towne East.

    “There was a lot of loitering; a lot of drinking on the sidewalk;, the litter was atrocious, people would just throw the cans or the glasses down,” Moore says. “What I’ve seen, there was selling to minors, public urination, drug dealing, just all of those undesirable things that you don’t want in a neighborhood.”

    http://wosu.org/2012/news/2012/11/12/a-dry-olde-towne-east-improves-quality-of-life-residents-say/

    ———

    Well dry until you build a craft beer carryout at Oak & Parsons ;) Realistically though I understand their point.

    #541147
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    if we are going the way of Vegas and Texas, do we get red-light districts and recreational pot too? seems the slippery slope gets more slippery…this argument does seem to have class considerations…poor folks drinking in public = vagrancy, rich folks drinking in public= entertainment.

    #541148

    mrpoppinzs
    Member

    lazyfish said:
    this argument does seem to have class considerations…poor folks drinking in public = vagrancy, rich folks drinking in public= entertainment.

    +1 Good point,

    #541149

    joev
    Participant

    lazyfish said:
    if we are going the way of Vegas and Texas, do we get red-light districts and recreational pot too? seems the slippery slope gets more slippery…this argument does seem to have class considerations…poor folks drinking in public = vagrancy, rich folks drinking in public= entertainment.

    I wouldn’t mind a drive-through daiquiri stand.

    #541150

    drew
    Participant

    jackoh said:
    You are absolutely correct in your assessment. Of course, the comment was designed to be precisely that. What puzzles me is that if the consumption of alcohol in the confines of the SN causes significant problems for the residents there, why don’t they deal directly with the issue and eliminate the cause. (Actually the residents wouldn’t stand a chance in the face of the commercial interests along High st. and Park st.) But, in spite of all the complaining, they don’t want to eliminate drinking in the SN, they just want it to be confined to the “right” people. And, god help us, a designation as an open container entertainment district might bring “undesirable” drinkers into the area. Quite frankly, this sort of small time elitism bothers me. The amount of pearl clutching in this thread is a bit much.

    It’s as if it never occurred to you that moderation lies somewhere in between.

    I’m not sure how you’d characterize ‘undesirables’, but to me desirability is set at a very low standard, and it’s this: does not engage in criminal activity.

    Is that too much for a community to ask for?

    #541151

    Bear
    Participant

    jackoh said:
    What puzzles me is that if the consumption of alcohol in the confines of the SN causes significant problems for the residents there, why don’t they deal directly with the issue and eliminate the cause. (Actually the residents wouldn’t stand a chance in the face of the commercial interests along High st. and Park st.) But, in spite of all the complaining, they don’t want to eliminate drinking in the SN, they just want it to be confined to the “right” people. And, god help us, a designation as an open container entertainment district might bring “undesirable” drinkers into the area. Quite frankly, this sort of small time elitism bothers me. The amount of pearl clutching in this thread is a bit much.

    It’s elitist to prefer that fewer people puke in your yard or pee in your alley?

    #541152

    News
    Participant

    SATURDAY, SEP 28, 2013 04:30 PM EDT
    Downtown revitalization secret: Let us drink in public!
    BY HENRY GRABAR

    Parking lots and plots of bare earth line much of Beale Street, on the south side of downtown Memphis. The landscape is a familiar one. Hollowed out by population flight and urban renewal, it recalls parts of downtown Jackson, Cleveland or Tulsa. Cross South Fourth Street, though, and it’s as if you’ve stepped back in time. Striped awnings shelter sidewalk tables from the Tennessee sun. Neon signs jut from the walls of squat brick buildings. King’s Palace Cafe. The Blues Hall Juke Joint. Whatever the time of day, live music streams from the doorways. This is a familiar scene too: It’s the dazzling American streetscape of the 1920s.

    One big difference? The 4 million people who visited Beale Street in 2012 could drink their bourbon, scotch and beer in the street. In fact, they are encouraged to do so.

    Ohio state Sen. Eric Kearney, who has sponsored legislation that would allow cities like Cleveland and Columbus to create their own alcohol-friendly zones, says it’s an economic opportunity. “Particularly in Ohio cities whose downtowns have been struggling a little bit, this is a shot in the arm,” Kearney told me. Oktoberfest Zinzinnati, for example, drew half a million people to five blocks of Cincinnati last week. Could the city attract crowds like that year round? Kearney mentioned Beale Street as a model. “That’s what we’re trying to imitate — that kind of energy, that type of environment.”

    READ MORE: http://www.salon.com/2013/09/28/downtown_revitalization_secret_let_us_drink_in_public/

    #541153

    News
    Participant

    Could booze be a tonic for Ohio cities?
    Oct. 25, 2013
    by Cindi Andrews, The Cincinnati Enquirer

    CINCINNATI — Better known for loosening inhibitions, booze may soon be used to lubricate the wheels of economic development in some Ohio communities.

    A growing number of cities nationwide, including Memphis, Louisville and Montgomery, Ala., allow people to openly drink on the streets, a la New Orleans, to encourage economic development.

    Now, a bipartisan “open container” bill giving that option to Ohio cities is given a good chance of passage in coming months. Sponsoring Democratic state Sen. Eric Kearney is tweaking it after a committee hearing, with a committee vote likely late this year or when the General Assembly returns in March.

    READ MORE: http://www.theleafchronicle.com/usatoday/article/3185455

    #541154

    News
    Participant

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