Our City Online

Messageboard - Politics

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

Ohio Governor's Race 2014

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Politics Ohio Governor's Race 2014

Viewing 15 posts - 211 through 225 (of 253 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1040593

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    I should add that the one danger now for Kasich’s admin and the GOP in general in Ohio, is overreach. Unchecked power leads to corruption and abuses of all kinds. Ohio Republicans may now believe they are unstoppable, even invincible, but that just sets them up for a blowout scandal much bigger than Thomas Noe, with greater repercussions.

    I have little faith that the ever-inept state level Democrats will give them any sort of challenge anytime soon, however, even if another window like 2006 should open. They picked FitzGerald after all, without even vetting him for something as asininely simple as a driver’s license. As bad as he looks in all of this, the derp factor is even higher for the Dem party leaders.

    Maybe one of the third parties or a new group altogether will rise up to challenge “business as usual” in this state? I doubt it, but people can dream.

    #1040599
    hugh59
    hugh59
    Participant

    The population in Ohio is diverse enough that I doubt that either of the two main parties will ever be able to create a permanent majority. Things may look bad for the Dems right now, but they looked pretty grim for the Reps from the mid 70s until the late 80s (especially at the legislature level).

    I think it is very possible (perhaps almost a certainty) that the Dems will be much more powerful in the 2020s and will take back control of the legislature.

    #1041384

    News
    Participant

    Columbus Dispatch Poll Shows Grim News For Ohio Democrats With 50 Days Left Until Election
    By Jim Heath
    Monday September 15, 2014 11:48 AM

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Just two years after the Columbus Dispatch poll correctly predicted a slim victory for president Obama over rival Mitt Romney in Ohio, a new poll in the statewide races show the potential for a Republican blowout similar to the 2010 election.

    READ MORE: http://www.10tv.com/content/stories/2014/09/15/columbus-ohio-columbus-dispatch-poll-shows-grim-news-for-ohio-democrats-with-50-days-left-until-election.html

    #1041403

    Hamsterdam
    Participant

    I believe Republicans have won every statewide elected executive office since 1994 except four in 2006. If you count this upcoming sweep, that will put the Republican record at 26-4 in the past six elections.

    I don’t know how the 2020s will be any different. Obama won Ohio in 2008 and 2012. A Progressive Fundamentalist like Sherrod Brown wins routinely in this state. Democrats likely will continue to do well in presidential elections in Ohio.

    But for statewide offices in Ohio, they are absolutely miserable. It is tough for an incumbent to lose the governorship, I will grant you that, but wow, the Ohio Democratic Party is just God awful.

    As a Republican, I hope whoever is in charge over at the ODP stays there for a very, very, very long time.

    #1041458
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    Maybe you missed the news, but this thread is dead because FitzGerald’s disastrous campaign and lack of proper vetting by his party. With it has gone virtually any hope we have of driving Kasich out of office and setting Ohio on a more progressive trajectory before January 2019 at the very least.

    My guess is people wanting to see marriage equality legalized here are now hoping to go the legal route that seems to be working in Wisconsin and Indiana.

    As for those of us who also want to see high speed rail here in our lifetimes, we are now looking into cryogenic suspension. It appears that this is going to require some serious generational turnover. The Baby Boomers who so love their multi-lane jammed-up highways, McMansions and cars must exit the halls of power. Since they don’t seem to be in that big of a hurry to do so on their own, time and nature will have to run its course with them.

    Perhaps in 10-15 years, a HSR project similar to the one that tried to begin in 2010 will see the light of day. It sucks that people like Kasich must be so stubborn and ignorant as to block something that would only benefit the state and its citizens over the long haul. Fuck them all.

    My hope has shifted to the fact that I don’t think Kasich has any real principles other than “Show Me the Money.” He’s not a real social conservative by any means. His mind could change awfully fast on a lot of swing issues if they made enough dollars and sense.

    #1041480

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    My hope has shifted to the fact that I don’t think Kasich has any real principles other than “Show Me the Money.” He’s not a real social conservative by any means. His mind could change awfully fast on a lot of swing issues if they made enough dollars and sense.

    Fat chance. He’s a stubborn ass.

    #1041638

    nohio
    Participant

    Kasich is most certainly a social conservative -he is intractable when it comes to women’s reproductive rights and skirts the gay issues because of all the rumors he endured the last time he thought about running for national office and the fact that he and his assistant lived in a DC apartment with 1 bedroom and 1 bed for well over a decade, among other rumors that floated about.

    The term stubborn is accurate-I remember when he ran for USG President at Ohio State and lost to future Cleveland mayor Michael White -he was not a happy boy back then and demanded recounts when he finished in 4th and 5 place.

    Yet people in Westerville love him- grandmothers have his pic above their mantles- seriously…..

    His policies are alarming and about as conservative as you can get. The Democrats who once had Metzenbaum as Senator in this state have dropped off the face of the earth. It is very sad.

    #1041761

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    But for statewide offices in Ohio, they are absolutely miserable. It is tough for an incumbent to lose the governorship, I will grant you that, but wow, the Ohio Democratic Party is just God awful.

    As a Republican, I hope whoever is in charge over at the ODP stays there for a very, very, very long time.

    Unchecked single party dominance of any branch or level of government isn’t at all a good thing. This is as true of local government as it is at the state level. I know some people are as married to a party as they are to a religion, but we can do with a lot less of that approach to politics in this country.

    I have no allegiance to either of the major parties. Quite honestly, they both suck as far as I’m concerned.

    George Carlin said it best. For the choices that actually matter, you get very few meaningful options vs. the ones that don’t matter.

    For a nation of 300+ million people, doesn’t it seem the least bit absurd that everyone’s views are supposed to be concisely and neatly represented by one or the other of two parties? Really??

    I say either liquidate both the Dems and GOP, ban all other parties, and force every politician to run as an independent, or else switch to multi-member proportional districts at all levels of government and open the door to parliamentary-style multi-party coalitions.

    Of course, the Democrats and Republicans don’t want to see either of these reforms, which is all the more reason why we need them.

    #1041891

    gramarye
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Hamsterdam wrote:</div>
    But for statewide offices in Ohio, they are absolutely miserable. It is tough for an incumbent to lose the governorship, I will grant you that, but wow, the Ohio Democratic Party is just God awful.

    As a Republican, I hope whoever is in charge over at the ODP stays there for a very, very, very long time.

    Unchecked single party dominance of any branch or level of government isn’t at all a good thing. This is as true of local government as it is at the state level. I know some people are as married to a party as they are to a religion, but we can do with a lot less of that approach to politics in this country.

    I have no allegiance to either of the major parties. Quite honestly, they both suck as far as I’m concerned.

    George Carlin said it best. For the choices that actually matter, you get very few meaningful options vs. the ones that don’t matter.

    For a nation of 300+ million people, doesn’t it seem the least bit absurd that everyone’s views are supposed to be concisely and neatly represented by one or the other of two parties? Really??

    I say either liquidate both the Dems and GOP, ban all other parties, and force every politician to run as an independent, or else switch to multi-member proportional districts at all levels of government and open the door to parliamentary-style multi-party coalitions.

    Of course, the Democrats and Republicans don’t want to see either of these reforms, which is all the more reason why we need them.

    They tried this. It lasted all of two seconds in political years. They “tried” it because the original Constitution didn’t anticipate the rise of political parties; they grew organically from the results of the system, which reward cooperative efforts.

    And I prefer that over the realistic alternatives. The alternative isn’t an escape from partisan politics and increased independence for political candidates; it’s the rise of celebrity candidates with cults of personality and rockstar status, because they’re the only ones who could win without parties backing them up.

    As to the representation of more than two views with only two parties, remember that there are serious limits to how much a party can actually do to influence its own members rather than the other way around. The parties act as moderating forces by forcing people holding multiple different viewpoints to come together and agree on something resembling a coherent agenda (or, if not coherent, at least less insane than many of them would likely have on their own). I did a lot of comparative government work at OSU and I didn’t come out all that impressed with more proportional-representation systems; the PR systems I liked best were the ones that were the least PR, such as Germany (which has a high threshold for recognition).

    The current two-party system keeps out a serious secular libertarian party, which I regret, since I’d probably feel reasonably at home there. But it also keeps out the Greens, the Communists, the Constitution Party, and other asylum escapees.

    #1041908

    News
    Participant

    10TV Exclusive: Kasich Pulled Plug On Debate With FitzGerald During Prep
    By Jim Heath
    Tuesday September 16, 2014 6:15 PM

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Sources close to John Kasich’s reelection campaign tell 10TV that the governor was preparing for a debate with challenger Ed FitzGerald last Friday when he decided to call it off after news broke that FitzGerald had failed to disclose traffic violations while filling out a form for a seat on the Lakewood city council 15 years ago.

    READ MORE: http://www.10tv.com/content/stories/2014/09/16/columbus-ohio-10tv-exclusive-kasich-pulled-plug-on-debate-with-fitzgerald-during-prep.html

    #1041925

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    They tried this. It lasted all of two seconds in political years. They “tried” it because the original Constitution didn’t anticipate the rise of political parties; they grew organically from the results of the system, which reward cooperative efforts.

    And I prefer that over the realistic alternatives. The alternative isn’t an escape from partisan politics and increased independence for political candidates; it’s the rise of celebrity candidates with cults of personality and rockstar status, because they’re the only ones who could win without parties backing them up.

    As to the representation of more than two views with only two parties, remember that there are serious limits to how much a party can actually do to influence its own members rather than the other way around. The parties act as moderating forces by forcing people holding multiple different viewpoints to come together and agree on something resembling a coherent agenda (or, if not coherent, at least less insane than many of them would likely have on their own). I did a lot of comparative government work at OSU and I didn’t come out all that impressed with more proportional-representation systems; the PR systems I liked best were the ones that were the least PR, such as Germany (which has a high threshold for recognition).

    The current two-party system keeps out a serious secular libertarian party, which I regret, since I’d probably feel reasonably at home there. But it also keeps out the Greens, the Communists, the Constitution Party, and other asylum escapees.

    I’ve heard every rationalization possible for keeping the two-party system as is. I don’t buy any of them. IMHO, we’re just too complacent/lazy/scared/whatever to change.

    I guess I just have a high tolerance for openly expressed alternate viewpoints in politics, including those that are quite a bit extreme, even diametrically opposed to my own. I see it as a tradeoff, however. If other, additional people and viewpoints are heard and granted representation, my own views and interests also have a much more likely chance of seeing the light of day and gaining representation of some kind. Even if it’s a marginal viewpoint, it’s still being openly acknowledged for something that exists, rather than being relegated to some forgettable corner within one of the two “big tent” parties.

    Call it a ploy for greater public participation and involvement. The Democrats and Republicans aren’t exactly champions on this one. But then, with the way our system is set up, with a first-past-the-post winner-take-all approach to awarding seats, as well as gerrymandering and the presidential electoral vote system, they don’t have to be. Our political direction and outlook as a country isn’t determined nationwide, but in select districts and states. This is bound to become an even greater problem over time, as when fewer and fewer people feel that the current political system gives them a voice, they will begin to seek alternate, extra-legal means of expressing that voice.

    #1041998

    gramarye
    Participant

    I’ve heard every rationalization possible for keeping the two-party system as is. I don’t buy any of them. IMHO, we’re just too complacent/lazy/scared/whatever to change.

    I guess I just have a high tolerance for openly expressed alternate viewpoints in politics, including those that are quite a bit extreme, even diametrically opposed to my own. I see it as a tradeoff, however. If other, additional people and viewpoints are heard and granted representation, my own views and interests also have a much more likely chance of seeing the light of day and gaining representation of some kind. Even if it’s a marginal viewpoint, it’s still being openly acknowledged for something that exists, rather than being relegated to some forgettable corner within one of the two “big tent” parties.

    Call it a ploy for greater public participation and involvement. The Democrats and Republicans aren’t exactly champions on this one. But then, with the way our system is set up, with a first-past-the-post winner-take-all approach to awarding seats, as well as gerrymandering and the presidential electoral vote system, they don’t have to be. Our political direction and outlook as a country isn’t determined nationwide, but in select districts and states. This is bound to become an even greater problem over time, as when fewer and fewer people feel that the current political system gives them a voice, they will begin to seek alternate, extra-legal means of expressing that voice.

    I’m pretty sure regional relations within the country are still somewhat above the level of, say, 1861. I would posit that as something of a nadir.

    You say you’ve heard all the arguments, so I’m sure you’re familiar with the kingmaker dynamic. That might not be enough to persuade you, but it’s enough to persuade me. Much as I like the thought of a libertarian party able to wrest concessions from the Republicans in order to form a national governing coalition, a more likely outcome is an openly Christian Right party (and despite leftist handwringing to the contrary, the current Republican Party is not just a vehicle of that subgroup) getting to play that role. Under the current system, the Christian Right has to form a coalition with secular libertarians and business factions before it even gets to throw its (diluted) hat in the ring. Under a PR system, they’d be able to win their seats first and only think about compromise later–if at all.

    There are governments out there with highly proportional systems. They’re not complete basket cases, but the coordination problems are certainly serious. Italy and Israel are probably the two most salient examples. Governments in Italy are extremely unstable and I don’t think the fragmentation of viewpoints there has had anything remotely resembling a positive effect on the government’s ability to act wisely. As for Israel, the open power wielded by the Israeli religious right, even despite how much they often irk their own countrymen, might be possible in a first-past-the-post system (because the Israeli religious right is geographically concentrated, particularly in the settlements, and could win some districts there), but they’d likely face significantly more unified domestic opposition.

    #1042469
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    The Dispatch editorial board officially endorsed Kasich today. No big surprise.

    #1043096

    News
    Participant

    #1043286
    Jesse Bethea
    Jesse Bethea
    Participant

    Ed Fitzgerald made it to Politico’s “Worst campaigns of 2014” list. Something of a dubious honor.

    http://www.politico.com/story/2014/09/2014-worst-campaigns-111311_Page2.html

Viewing 15 posts - 211 through 225 (of 253 total)

The forum ‘Politics’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Subscribe below: