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Easton Gateway

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Viewing 15 posts - 91 through 105 (of 260 total)
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  • #513068

    MFRONE
    Participant

    Never encountered any horrible traffic at Easton unless it’s rush hour.

    #513069

    InnerCore
    Participant

    Here is a quick sketch of a different layout:

    This is roughly the same SF of what is proposed now on the layout is changed. Here are some thoughts.

    They seemed to layout buildings so that you can drive up to each location. For example it looks like some restaurants on the out parcels with their own parking lot. This makes it convenient if you want to go to only one specific store.

    Instead what I tried to do was group the retail together along a boulevard. Preferably with street parking, trees, etc. This is going to greatly affect the type of retail you get. So in their plan you’re much more likely to get the chain restaurants that thrive by themselves (think Applebees, Chili’s, etc.). Whereas in the boulevard layout you’re going to be able to get more mom and pop style restaurants that thrive off being located next to retail. You’ll also have the opportunity for patio’s which help the smaller restaurants by increasing their seating capacity in warm weather with free outdoor seating.

    So essentially in this layout you’ll feel comfortable walking to and from all the smaller retail stores. The only time you would need to drive between stores is if you were going to either WF or Costco. But that isn’t a big deal considering you would likely purchasing large quantities of items at these stores anyway.

    I moved the gas station to Morse Rd. where it belongs. As the area build up you want more of a residential feel along Stelzer rd. For the same reason I would also put street parking along Stelzer to calm traffic.

    The site marked MU could just be more retail stores but I think this is a good site for residential. I’d put structured parking with retail lining the garage facing the rest of the retail with midrise residential above.

    So basically you’d live across the street from Easton which is probably the best shopping in Columbus. You’d be with walking distance of Whole Foods which is probably the best grocery store. Then even after the Costco you’d have about 170,000 SF of Jr. anchor retail (think Office Depot, Linen’s N things, etc.) and about 100,000 SF of small shops retail within walking distance.

    Now in my scenario because I grouped all the retail together it would probably be a bit more small shop and less Jr. anchor so I guess it would be a little bit more risky and susceptible to turnover. But I think you would get more of a neighborhood feel (think daily growler instead of world of beers). I think that way it would compete less with Easton.

    I’d also go across the street just north of Worth Ave and knock down a bunch of trees and create a little temporary park. Carve out a little path for people to jog and have a place to walk their pets. The cost are minimal, it provides an amenity for the residents, and it creates a better feel when people are driving to and from Easton. Most people don’t see it as a place to live so I think driving past a park would give them a good impression. And it can be easily replaced as demand for the vacant lots picks up.

    #513070

    Pablo
    Participant

    jbcmh81 said:
    I think we’ve already been over why we disagree so often. It’s just clear that you have very little respect for Columbus in general and it permeates every viewpoint. I can’t imagine this helps when you’re going to investors to try to sell a city you don’t think is much worth the effort. I don’t imagine those people are stupid, so if you don’t believe it, why should they?

    I’m not reading what you’re reading – I think Innercore is being realistic about development here in Columbus. I think local developers generally are provincial and won’t stick their necks out to try something new. They’re about 10 years behind the rest of the nation. I can be pretty depressing reading Urban Land magazine and see all the wonderfully dense projects happening in similarly sized cities. I come in contact with many developers and they’re mostly interested in maximizing their profits without risking much (not that there’s anything wrong with this business model – it just makes for a homogeneous city).

    #513071

    MFRONE
    Participant

    Problem with that “new” layout is that isn’t what Costco wants and they don’t want their gas station right on Morse Rd.

    #513072

    InnerCore
    Participant

    MFRONE said:
    Problem with that “new” layout is that isn’t what Costco wants and they don’t want their gas station right on Morse Rd.

    Why would they not want a gas station on the street where more cars drive???? It’s not a coincidence that BP and Shell are at that intersection.

    Regardless it doesn’t really work that way. Costco isn’t developing this project Steiner is. Costco is basically signing a lease before construction that Steiner will then use to help get financing. Now Steiner has to work with Costco to make sure the space meets all of their design criteria. And that’s probably where my design is most off. I’m sure they’ve got specific requirements for things like loading docks which I’m not showing.

    But the sketch was more to discuss from a conceptual standpoint. And as I pointed out in the other thread they’ve have over more than 1,100 extra parking spaces in the project taking up over 330,000 sf. So I’m sure if you gave me a CAD file and a few days I could make it work but I doubt Steiner is going to send me a check for my time.

    #513073

    MFRONE
    Participant

    The gas station at Costco is for members only and the revenue generated from the sales is basically used just to cover the operating costs. It’s why most of their gas stations are “hidden” or not in prime locations.

    #513074
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    I’m trying to respond to every thread here tonight because I had some vodka, but the fact is, some cities have other things they highlight.

    Rather than just highlighting their former agricultural fields as red-light districts for big-box stores.

    Say, did you know the state of Ohio is high on the list of most environmentally degraded states? Like REALLY HIGH.

    I don’t totally begrudge a Costco, which I certainly approve a lot more than certain other businesses. But you know, when does it stop? Does every place have to be Any Place? I think we should get the Costco. But the larger trend, it needs some critical thinking.

    I’m not a big government believer, but unfortunately in the USA, the larger subset that makes decisions is the government. I think its time for zoning to step up in Cbus. We’ll have 10 years or so of Wexner et al. making money on these developments then we’ll be faced with some shitty land no one wants. Not to villainize Wexner and the like, I think they’re nice guys just trying to do their best. But we have to exert our voices.

    #513075

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    InnerCore said:
    Here is a quick sketch of a different layout:

    This is roughly the same SF of what is proposed now on the layout is changed. Here are some thoughts.

    They seemed to layout buildings so that you can drive up to each location. For example it looks like some restaurants on the out parcels with their own parking lot. This makes it convenient if you want to go to only one specific store.

    Instead what I tried to do was group the retail together along a boulevard. Preferably with street parking, trees, etc. This is going to greatly affect the type of retail you get. So in their plan you’re much more likely to get the chain restaurants that thrive by themselves (think Applebees, Chili’s, etc.). Whereas in the boulevard layout you’re going to be able to get more mom and pop style restaurants that thrive off being located next to retail. You’ll also have the opportunity for patio’s which help the smaller restaurants by increasing their seating capacity in warm weather with free outdoor seating.

    So essentially in this layout you’ll feel comfortable walking to and from all the smaller retail stores. The only time you would need to drive between stores is if you were going to either WF or Costco. But that isn’t a big deal considering you would likely purchasing large quantities of items at these stores anyway.

    I moved the gas station to Morse Rd. where it belongs. As the area build up you want more of a residential feel along Stelzer rd. For the same reason I would also put street parking along Stelzer to calm traffic.

    The site marked MU could just be more retail stores but I think this is a good site for residential. I’d put structured parking with retail lining the garage facing the rest of the retail with midrise residential above.

    So basically you’d live across the street from Easton which is probably the best shopping in Columbus. You’d be with walking distance of Whole Foods which is probably the best grocery store. Then even after the Costco you’d have about 170,000 SF of Jr. anchor retail (think Office Depot, Linen’s N things, etc.) and about 100,000 SF of small shops retail within walking distance.

    Now in my scenario because I grouped all the retail together it would probably be a bit more small shop and less Jr. anchor so I guess it would be a little bit more risky and susceptible to turnover. But I think you would get more of a neighborhood feel (think daily growler instead of world of beers). I think that way it would compete less with Easton.

    I’d also go across the street just north of Worth Ave and knock down a bunch of trees and create a little temporary park. Carve out a little path for people to jog and have a place to walk their pets. The cost are minimal, it provides an amenity for the residents, and it creates a better feel when people are driving to and from Easton. Most people don’t see it as a place to live so I think driving past a park would give them a good impression. And it can be easily replaced as demand for the vacant lots picks up.

    Looks like a huge improvement.

    #513076

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    Pablo said:
    I’m not reading what you’re reading – I think Innercore is being realistic about development here in Columbus. I think local developers generally are provincial and won’t stick their necks out to try something new. They’re about 10 years behind the rest of the nation. I can be pretty depressing reading Urban Land magazine and see all the wonderfully dense projects happening in similarly sized cities. I come in contact with many developers and they’re mostly interested in maximizing their profits without risking much (not that there’s anything wrong with this business model – it just makes for a homogeneous city).

    I really couldn’t disagree with you more, about IC or about development in the city. Certainly there are projects that are subpar in terms of urban design, and Easton Gateway is one of them, but I’m kind of tired of these blanket generalizations thrown around. There are plenty of projects that are not Easton Gateway. And let’s be honest here, for every city’s urban project that makes it into a development magazine, it is absolutely 100% guaranteed that there are 10 more that are shit. For every rail line built in Charlotte, how many miles of sprawl go up? Context always seems to be wildly misplaced in all this.

    If I’m to believe this idea you’re suggesting, why do you think it is that Columbus is growing at all? If the city is so far behind everywhere else, why are people moving there? Is it just the economy? If so, what a city full of miserable people, stuck in a generic, boring city just for a job. Maybe a bit hyperbolic, but come on. Cities don’t grow when they have far more wrong than right.

    #513077
    Jason Powell
    Jason Powell
    Participant

    Pablo said:
    I’m not reading what you’re reading – I think Innercore is being realistic about development here in Columbus. I think local developers generally are provincial and won’t stick their necks out to try something new. They’re about 10 years behind the rest of the nation. I can be pretty depressing reading Urban Land magazine and see all the wonderfully dense projects happening in similarly sized cities. I come in contact with many developers and they’re mostly interested in maximizing their profits without risking much (not that there’s anything wrong with this business model – it just makes for a homogeneous city).

    Agreed

    #513078
    Jason Powell
    Jason Powell
    Participant

    jbcmh81 said:
    And let’s be honest here, for every city’s urban project that makes it into a development magazine, it is absolutely 100% guaranteed that there are 10 more that are shit. For every rail line built in Charlotte, how many miles of sprawl go up?

    It is that same mindset and reinfocement of the suburban lifestyle by most developers and the city’s lax zoning that will continue the spreading out of suburbia. Why should there be 10 shitty projects to every one good development? Because developers can get away with it. Because our zoning codes are antiquated and permit it. Because some of our policy makers are uneducated in city planning principles meant for good quality of life and sustainability. To make matters worse, all of these problems have trained the average mindset into believing that much of what has been built over the past few decades is sufficient. I’m sorry but the human race deserves better. Many people do not demand better simply because they do not know any better.

    #513079

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    jpizzow said:
    It is that same mindset and reinfocement of the suburban lifestyle by most developers and the city’s lax zoning that will continue the spreading out of suburbia. Why should there be 10 shitty projects to every one good development? Because developers can get away with it. Because our zoning codes are antiquated and permit it. Because some of our policy makers are uneducated in city planning principles meant for good quality of life and sustainability. To make matters worse, all of these problems have trained the average mindset into believing that much of what has been built over the past few decades is sufficient. I’m sorry but the human race deserves better. Many people do not demand better simply because they do not know any better.

    +1
    I’m pretty much convinced that not much will change in terms of land use and transportation throughout most of the US until the SHTF here on some level or another, likely as another energy crisis, perhaps resulting from an environmental catastrophe.

    Essentially, as long as there is gas at the pump that people can afford, nothing will change. It seems that most of the major international corporations also realize this and are both terrified of and threatened by a shift away from the status quo that has so richly benefited them, to the detriment of most other people on the planet. Hence their nearly palpable giddiness to frack up the land and resort to other extremely toxic and ruinous methods of oil and gas extraction. When you live and die by quarterly outcomes, you really don’t give a damn about the world 10, 25 or 50 years from now.

    But hey, Costco and Whole Foods is coming to Easton! Whoo-hoo!

    #513080
    Steve
    Steve
    Participant

    johnwirtz said:
    Looks like a huge improvement.

    I agree–Innercore’s redesign is fantastic.

    I’m going to protest the new development at the location. They’ll have to bulldoze me over! Also, I will yell at the devs via social media and email.

    I let you know when they don’t respond.

    #513081

    bucki12
    Member

    MFRONE said:
    The gas station at Costco is for members only and the revenue generated from the sales is basically used just to cover the operating costs. It’s why most of their gas stations are “hidden” or not in prime locations.

    Can’t see a better advertisement for Costco than a highly visible gas station on a major road with prices 7 cents lower then the competition. It would make me want to investigate it a little…and possibly get me to join.

    #513082

    bucki12
    Member

    stephentszuter said:
    I agree–Innercore’s redesign is fantastic.

    I also agree that InnerCore has made some really great posts on this board and seems to be churning things up in a good way. It is nice to see some fresh ideas.

Viewing 15 posts - 91 through 105 (of 260 total)

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