Our City Online

Messageboard - General Columbus Discussion

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

Easton Gateway

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Easton Gateway

Viewing 15 posts - 166 through 180 (of 260 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #513143

    wpcc88
    Participant

    InnerCore said:
    I’m pretty sure Charlotte has been around since the 1700’s. But regardless I’m not following the point you’re trying to make.

    My point is established cities surrounding and an industrial past. Columbus being a capital city in a once thriving state, now a reivitalizing state make it extremely different than Charlotte who has seen it’s growth happen in the last 30 years where Columbus has been revitalizing and growing over that same period of time.

    #513144

    InnerCore
    Participant

    dubdave00 said:
    Or maybe they just have to go to work occasionally. You know, to prevent ramifications to their economy…

    You’re telling me in a city as large as Columbus only 20 people weren’t working at 6 PM?

    #513145

    ricospaz
    Participant

    This discussion is so Feb 1st

    #513146

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    F5Equity said:
    I believe, he refrences them because you aspire to be like the top performing peer cities not the poor ones. Lets design a peer group for Columbus. It could look soemthing like this

    1. Cleveland
    2. Nati
    3. Indy
    4. Buffalo
    5. Millwaukee
    6. Austin
    7. Denver
    8. Nashville
    9. Detroit
    10. charlotte
    11. Albany
    12. Portland

    So we can define those as our peer group. I believe he is saying “look we are better than some places, but worse than others”. Now, who strives to just be better than the bottom? You want to be better than the top, even if you don’t actually make it to the top. Again, referring to public equities, just because Huntington is awarded a better valuation than say Key, should they rest on their laurels, or should they strive to have a better valuation than BB&T, who has a much better footprint.

    Makes sense. I’d add a few to that list too based on comparable population, like Oklahoma City, Kansas City, San Antonio, Jacksonville, Memphis, San Antonio, Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Pittsburgh, Louisville, Orlando.

    #513147

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    F5Equity said:
    I believe, he refrences them because you aspire to be like the top performing peer cities not the poor ones. Lets design a peer group for Columbus. It could look soemthing like this

    1. Cleveland
    2. Nati
    3. Indy
    4. Buffalo
    5. Millwaukee
    6. Austin
    7. Denver
    8. Nashville
    9. Detroit
    10. charlotte
    11. Albany
    12. Portland

    So we can define those as our peer group. I believe he is saying “look we are better than some places, but worse than others”. Now, who strives to just be better than the bottom? You want to be better than the top, even if you don’t actually make it to the top. Again, referring to public equities, just because Huntington is awarded a better valuation than say Key, should they rest on their laurels, or should they strive to have a better valuation than BB&T, who has a much better footprint.

    Columbus is well ahead of the bottom already. My point is that striving for better and more is, I think, what we all want. My disagreement comes with demanding that Columbus be like cities it probably cannot realistically be right now, as if the city has already reached the top and just isn’t meeting its full potential. It would be like building and NFL stadium without having an NFL team. Growth and development do not simply happen overnight, nor does change. Columbus is evolving, but it still is a middle of the pack city in that list above. It’s fine to strive for the moon, so long as you keep your expectations on the ground.

    #513148

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    johnwirtz said:
    Makes sense. I’d add a few to that list too based on comparable population, like Oklahoma City, Kansas City, San Antonio, Jacksonville, Memphis, San Antonio, Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Pittsburgh, Louisville, Orlando.

    Agreed, that full list is pretty good, I think. The city is ahead of some, even with some and behind others. About what I would expect at this point.

    #513149

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    InnerCore said:

    What does me living here have to do with anything. I do want to develop here. Currently me and my partner have better prospects in other places. I want us to develop in Columbus, but its harder because of many of the issues I’ve listed.

    See, you’ve basically become a hypocrite with this. You demand developers and residents and the city do more, but you’re in a position to actually follow through and won’t because it’s just “too hard”. You shouldn’t complain about how others aren’t doing what you won’t do yourself.

    #513150

    myliftkk
    Participant

    johnwirtz said:
    Makes sense. I’d add a few to that list too based on comparable population, like Oklahoma City, Kansas City, San Antonio, Jacksonville, Memphis, San Antonio, Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Pittsburgh, Louisville, Orlando.

    You really should look at regional groups first, before doing comparison across geographic regions.

    Many of my co-workers that reside in FL, all of whom would have been “young professionals” at some point have said many times they would never come this far north due to the cold. Any comparison has to control for a serious segment of the population that considers the drastic weather pattern change once you get above the south as a non-starter, I don’t care how walkable your community is.

    #513151

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    F5Equity said:
    Actually, if we look at MSA, and not just the city, I am not sure if we are better off than any of the cities I listed. I mean heck, even the Detroit MSA, is a much better place to live with more amenities. Birmingham beats the socks off of the Short North, granted Detroit is much bigger, but still, its Detroit.

    So you’re basically arguing that urban development doesn’t matter, because even if a city has some better neighborhoods, there is no guarantee that people will want to live there. Detroit is awful, and a few better neighborhoods have not meant crap for decades. So tell me again how Detroit is so much better.

    #513152

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    spfld_expat said:
    Only on CU would a relatively innocuous thread that started 5 months ago about a shopping mall expansion turn into “who are we?” “Why are we here?” “What will the future bring?” (that may sound snarky, but I say it with affection).

    Anyway, forget zoning, light rail, walkable neighborhoods, bike lanes and all that. Mike Coleman was right, what Columbus needs is SWAGGER.

    We need some giant bling on the Scioto.

    #513153

    Lu
    Participant

    Anyway, forget zoning, light rail, walkable neighborhoods, bike lanes and all that. Mike Coleman was right, what Columbus needs is SWAGGER.

    And much better schools.

    #513154

    InnerCore
    Participant

    jbcmh81 said:
    See, you’ve basically become a hypocrite with this. You demand developers and residents and the city do more, but you’re in a position to actually follow through and won’t because it’s just “too hard”. You shouldn’t complain about how others aren’t doing what you won’t do yourself.

    How am I in a position to do anything. I’m currently trying to develop urban sustainable housing in the city in that I live, with the contacts and resources I have.

    I want to eventually make the transition to developing in Columbus. However that transition seems hard because the lenders don’t want to do business there.

    I haven’t demanded anything from the developers. I’ve stated that as long as the rules are they way they are developers are going to continue to do what they are doing. I don’t fault them. I’d rather develop a crappy project in Columbus and get paid than not develop a project at all.

    And who cares even if I was a hypocrite. That doesn’t change the validity of my argument. Eating healthy and exercising regularly leads to better health. If I was arguing that people should eat better and workout more to be healthy matter if while I did it I was overweight and ate Twinkies for dinner?

    #513155
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    jbcmh81 said:
    We need some giant bling on the Scioto.

    Damn straight, dramatic public art = swagger.

    #513156

    peter
    Participant

    Only on CU would a relatively innocuous thread that started 5 months ago about a shopping mall expansion turn into “who are we?” “Why are we here?” “What will the future bring?” (that may sound snarky, but I say it with affection).

    Ha, it’s true. We’re a predictable lot. :)

    #513157

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    myliftkk said:
    You really should look at regional groups first, before doing comparison across geographic regions.

    Yeah, it’s a tough call because cities like Cleveland, Pittsburgh, and Milwaukee have similar weather, but a very different history and urban form. Development wise, Columbus is more comparable to places like Oklahoma City, Nashville, and Austin, but obviously the weather is very different. The best comp is probably Indy.

Viewing 15 posts - 166 through 180 (of 260 total)

The forum ‘General Columbus Discussion’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Subscribe below: