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Viewing 15 posts - 151 through 165 (of 260 total)
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  • #513128

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    F5Equity said:
    So emotional…Emotions don’t earn returns, emotions don’t get you ahead in life.

    Making silly claims are met with silly responses.

    And thanks for your concern, but I do very well in my life :)

    #513129

    F5Equity
    Member

    jbcmh81 said:
    Are Charlotte, Denver or Austin really peer cities, though? Just because they are of similar size *right now* lacks the context of what’s going on there. Clearly places like Charlotte and Austin have vastly different growth rates than Columbus does. Like it or not, this makes a huge difference in regards to development, both presently and for the future and in terms of quantity and type. I’m not sure that IC really gets this point, or if he does, he seems to not find it all that relevant.

    The Midwest is not high growth for the most part, I agree, and yet Columbus is the 2nd fastest growing metro for that region. I think that speaks far more about Columbus than it does comparing it to a Sun Belt city. Putting Columbus’ growth in context with its region and true peer cities is a far more honest way to judge Columbus’ performance, imo. Acting like there’s a huge problem because it’s not developing like a city with 30%+ growth rates seems very strange to me. Again, this is not arguing that Columbus doesn’t have developmental issues. It does, but making those issues artificially worse by making unrealistic and unfair comparisons doesn’t really do the city any good. Columbus is just not going to grow like that. I fully support aiming higher than the status quo, but let’s come back down to earth a bit, shall we?

    No, similar size is the best benchmark, geography is secondary. Heck, if we had a major change in Columbus, our growth prospects could be higher and I believe that is why innercore is pushing for, change. You bench mark against a wide variety of peers. Again I refer to public equities in this context. Huntington will be benchmarked not only against FITB, and KEY, but also against PNC, and CMA, and BBT, RF, etc. A comparison agaisnt 1 or 2 comps does not tell the whole story, and give the bigger picture. A peer group of at least 10 would be desirable. Sure you would include Cleveland, Nati, and Indy, but you would also include a charlotte, and an austin, and a denver.

    #513130

    InnerCore
    Participant

    F5Equity said:
    I am not sure, but Innercore is not Metlife, nor New York life or any other large debt provider. He sounds like a fairly young guy looking to get his start in CRE. Columbus can be a fine place for small scale developments for a player like himself. Forrest City (a Cleveland firm) is not building a 40 story tower in downtown columbus. They are building in other areas though……..

    As I’ve stated I spend my time here because I grew up here, my families here, I went to Ohio State through an ROTC scholarship and I love my home and want to see it do better.

    When I see the national trend that young people are leaving the larger places like NY and Chicago for smaller ones like Charlotte, Austin, and Denver I know that Columbus can offer just a good experience and lifestyle as them.

    You highlighting Forest City is a very good point. Interestingly enough I worked on with people from Forest when I lived in DC working as a project manager for a construction company. The overall project was called the Yards. If you’re not familiar I suggest people to check it out.

    http://www.dcyards.com/

    Here you have an Ohio based firm building exception products in other cities. I’m sure they would like to do much of this here, but instead they go where they can actually do it.

    #513131

    F5Equity
    Member

    InnerCore said:
    As I’ve stated I spend my time here because I grew up here, my families here, I went to Ohio State through an ROTC scholarship and I love my home and want to see it do better.

    When I see the national trend that young people are leaving the larger places like NY and Chicago for smaller ones like Charlotte, Austin, and Denver I know that Columbus can offer just a good experience and lifestyle as them.

    You highlighting Forest City is a very good point. Interestingly enough I worked on with people from Forest when I lived in DC working as a project manager for a construction company. The overall project was called the Yards. If you’re not familiar I suggest people to check it out.

    http://www.dcyards.com/

    Here you have an Ohio based firm building exception products in other cities. I’m sure they would like to do much of this here, but instead they go where they can actually do it.

    Agreed. Exactly why I mentioned them. Ohio firm, building cool projects, just not in Ohio.

    #513132

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    F5Equity said:
    No, similar size is the best benchmark. Growth prospects, while meaningful for valuation, are just that prospects. Heck, if we had a major change in Columbus, our growth prospects could be higher and I believe that is why innercore is pushing for, change. You bench mark against a wide variety of peers. Again I refer to public equities in this context. Huntington will be benchmarked not only against FITB, and KEY, but also against PNC, and CMA, and BBT, RF, etc. A comparison agaisnt 1 or 2 comps does not tell the whole story, and give the bigger picture. A peer group of at least 10 would be desirable. Sure you would include Cleveland, Nati, and Indy, but you would also include a charlotte, and an austin, and a denver.

    Aren’t we all pushing for change? Isn’t that the reason we’re on an urban forum talking about development? Because there is a recognition of issues and a desire to see solutions? That’s why I’m here, anyway. I’m just realistic about it. I just don’t expect Columbus to ever be a boom city like those in reference, and hence I don’t expect the quantity of development that goes along with it. Look, I don’t mind comparisons made between Charlotte, etc if they’re made within the context of how different these places are and the reasons why they are different. IC (and apparently you as well), seem to believe that the only real difference is that Columbus, its citizens and local developers just aren’t trying hard enough to do better. On that point, you may be partially correct, but there is a lot more going on than that. If Columbus was exactly the same city yet set in the Sun Belt, it would be growing like Charlotte and Austin. I don’t doubt that for one second. But it’s in the cloudy Midwest in a state that probably has the 2nd worst reputation behind Michigan for stereotypical decline. There are, after all, reasons why cities in the North are not booming in the way so many in the South are. And the funny thing is that IC seems to know this, as not a single Northern city has been used in comparison to Columbus. Are there no peer cities in half the country? If a mix of cities is the best plan, why are so many being ignored?

    Easy answer: It doesn’t fit the narrative.

    #513133

    peter
    Participant

    Peter, I can definitely respect your efforts. I can tell you that my interest in Columbus is that it’s my hometown where I grew up and where most of my family lives so I appreciate people such as yourself that are going out and making things happen.

    Ok, I’m starting to get a clearer picture of why people are taking issue with your comments here. So, just to clarify – you don’t live here, and you don’t have plans to develop here. So why waste your time and ours stirring up the hive, particularly if you can’t or won’t provide clear takeaways and action items?

    Again – nearly everyone here agrees with you (in large part) that Columbus is being held back by factors like zoning and lack of light rail. Great – so WHAT DO WE DO other than bitch about it to each other? Enough talk.

    The problem is that the issues facing Columbus aren’t things that individuals can address.

    I agree – it takes cooperation and organization to effect change. But I’m pretty sure we already have a host of organizations committed to the principles being espoused here (or maybe we don’t?) – is there a list somewhere?

    #513134

    F5Equity
    Member

    One of the largest things holding back Columbus is its public school system. Sure you can spout off about the 1 or 2 ok schools, but for large scale influx of people the city needs better schools. I think this is a project for the Ceo’s that are invested of the city of Columbus to tackle. Imagine in the ceo of AEP, nationwide, and Huntington got together, and forced the hand of the city / state, etc. If I were those CEO’s that would be my pet project. When big money talks Mikey Coleman will surely listen, and so will Kasich.

    #513135

    myliftkk
    Participant

    It’s fine to measure Columbus against other cities, but some of that has to be taken with a historical grain of salt.

    Denver? Come on, they’ve got two types of Rocky Mountain Highs now, and Denver’s been popular for decades given it’s relatively unchallenged position as the “big city” of the western, but non-coastal states. Where else you gonna move to, Cheyenne, or maybe Boise?

    Charlotte? Really, the area had a blistering job market for much of the 90s and into 00s, not to mention there are amazing scenic areas around it, as there are in most of NC, plus easy access to the mountains and mountain sports. However, you get the benefit/curse of being in the South, and believe me, Charlotte is still the South and all it entails.

    I completely believe institutional investors shy away from rust belt states. But, that’s a double edged sword. For a success story like Charlotte, we can drive through defunct development after defunct development across most all the cities in FL to showcase the “foresight” of those investors.

    Rent’s are comparable here to what they were in Orlando when I left in ’05. And, in some cases, much cheaper for better quality. In fact, I paid more to rent houses in one of Orlando’s downtown neighborhoods 8-10 years ago than I’ve ever paid to rent better or equivalent here.

    Wexner and Co. are gonna build what they know, and they know big box/outdoor malls. Are mall developers going to be able to recreate the dynamicism that gives historical downtowns and neighborhoods like the SN the cachet they earned over decades. Dynamicism that comes in large part from the mixing pot of class, race, and social strata all in a small area. Meh, I wouldn’t bet on it.

    #513136

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    InnerCore said:
    If its weather then how do explain a place like Denver.

    And as far as jobs, that’s definitely part of it. But Columbus’ economy is doing good as well so why aren’t people moving here?

    Besides which Jobs and growth are interconnected. Do you think most companies are going to move to Franklin County that has added 632 people through net domestic migration or Charlotte’s where they added over 9,000 or Austin with over 15,000.

    We have fundamental issues that need to be addressed. The longer we wait, the more the issues will compound themselves.

    Denver has the most sunny days per year in the country. It also has the mountains, so perhaps I should say weather/lifestyle. Columbus is growing modestly though, which I think is an accomplishment in the Midwest. Best of the worst kind of deal?

    #513137

    F5Equity
    Member

    jbcmh81 said:
    Aren’t we all pushing for change? Isn’t that the reason we’re on an urban forum talking about development? Because there is a recognition of issues and a desire to see solutions? That’s why I’m here, anyway. I’m just realistic about it. I just don’t expect Columbus to ever be a boom city like those in reference, and hence I don’t expect the quantity of development that goes along with it. Look, I don’t mind comparisons made between Charlotte, etc if they’re made within the context of how different these places are and the reasons why they are different. IC (and apparently you as well), seem to believe that the only real difference is that Columbus, its citizens and local developers just aren’t trying hard enough to do better. On that point, you may be partially correct, but there is a lot more going on than that. If Columbus was exactly the same city yet set in the Sun Belt, it would be growing like Charlotte and Austin. I don’t doubt that for one second. But it’s in the cloudy Midwest in a state that probably has the 2nd worst reputation behind Michigan for stereotypical decline. There are, after all, reasons why cities in the North are not booming in the way so many in the South are. And the funny thing is that IC seems to know this, as not a single Northern city has been used in comparison to Columbus. Are there no peer cities in half the country? If a mix of cities is the best plan, why are so many being ignored?

    Easy answer: It doesn’t fit the narrative.

    I believe, he refrences them because you aspire to be like the top performing peer cities not the poor ones. Lets design a peer group for Columbus. It could look soemthing like this

    1. Cleveland
    2. Nati
    3. Indy
    4. Buffalo
    5. Millwaukee
    6. Austin
    7. Denver
    8. Nashville
    9. Detroit
    10. charlotte
    11. Albany
    12. Portland

    So we can define those as our peer group. I believe he is saying “look we are better than some places, but worse than others”. Now, who strives to just be better than the bottom? You want to be better than the top, even if you don’t actually make it to the top. Again, referring to public equities, just because Huntington is awarded a better valuation than say Key, should they rest on their laurels, or should they strive to have a better valuation than BB&T, who has a much better footprint.

    #513138

    InnerCore
    Participant

    peter said:
    Ok, I’m starting to get a clearer picture of why people are taking issue with your comments here. So, just to clarify – you don’t live here, and you don’t have plans to develop here. So why waste your time and ours stirring up the hive, particularly if you can’t or won’t provide clear takeaways and action items?

    What does me living here have to do with anything. I do want to develop here. Currently me and my partner have better prospects in other places. I want us to develop in Columbus, but its harder because of many of the issues I’ve listed.

    I have been providing clear takeaways. We need to stop viewing rail as simply a means to reduce traffic and realize that it is vital to our economy. Again just think about our economy if we refused to build freeways.

    peter said:
    Again – nearly everyone here agrees with you (in large part) that Columbus is being held back by factors like zoning and lack of light rail. Great – so WHAT DO WE DO other than bitch about it to each other? Enough talk.

    As a resident shouldn’t you be the one asking yourself that question. Did you attend the TransitColumbus.org meeting 2 days ago? All I can do is send them money. Are you out organizing for a referendum. Are you writing you local representatives and telling them you wont vote for them if they don’t get the ball rolling.

    And this is the internet, it’s the place where you talk, and bitch and look at porn. I can tell you that right now I’m trying to develop small units without parking in Miami. During the last couple days I’ve been in contact with Zipcar discussing the possibility of including their cars in the development. It’s a model that I think would work in Columbus, but like most other developers I have to follow the money.

    peter said:
    I agree – it takes cooperation and organization to effect change. But I’m pretty sure we already have a host of organizations committed to the principles being espoused here (or maybe we don’t?) – is there a list somewhere?

    I don’t know of many. I’ve pointed out TransitColumbus.org. They’ve got a pathetic 158 likes on facebook. They had a meeting a couple of days ago where they had Kevin Boyce and COTA CEO Curtis Stitt and there were only a couple dozen people there. So in the largest city without rail, they hold a meeting about the future of public transit with the CEO of the largest public transit organization and only a few dozen people show up?? It would seem to me that the average citizen is either unaware of the ramifications that public transit has on their economy or they just don’t care.

    #513139

    F5Equity
    Member

    Actually, if we look at MSA, and not just the city, I am not sure if we are better off than any of the cities I listed. I mean heck, even the Detroit MSA, is a much better place to live with more amenities. Birmingham beats the socks off of the Short North, granted Detroit is much bigger, but still, its Detroit.

    #513140

    peter
    Participant

    Did you attend the TransitColumbus.org meeting 2 days ago?

    I did not, but had planned to. I will be attending future meetings.

    #513141

    dubdave00
    Participant

    InnerCore said:It would seem to me that the average citizen is either unaware of the ramifications that public transit has on their economy or they just don’t care.

    Or maybe they just have to go to work occasionally. You know, to prevent ramifications to their economy…

    #513142
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    Only on CU would a relatively innocuous thread that started 5 months ago about a shopping mall expansion turn into “who are we?” “Why are we here?” “What will the future bring?” (that may sound snarky, but I say it with affection).

    Anyway, forget zoning, light rail, walkable neighborhoods, bike lanes and all that. Mike Coleman was right, what Columbus needs is SWAGGER.

Viewing 15 posts - 151 through 165 (of 260 total)

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