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New Long Street Condos

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development New Long Street Condos

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Viewing 11 posts - 16 through 26 (of 26 total)
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  • #372101
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Columbusite wrote >>
    The question is: why are there so few of these kind of people now? I really don’t know why our pool of moneyed urban pioneers basically dried up after the success of the Short North.

    Uhm… A lot of them are still in the Short North.

    #372102

    lilbit
    Participant

    Why is the city prioritizing this lot over those? Is there something I’m not getting?

    These are privately held properties. If the owners don’t want to sell you can’t do anything about it.

    You’re not the first to complain about it.

    #372103
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    MichaelC wrote >>
    Very interesting. Walker, do you know of an early timetable, or an estimate as to the expected cost?

    If they mirror the other development along 21st done by CHP (http://www.northofbroad.com) then they should be pretty affordable.

    Waiting for the full details when I get a sit down interview with the folks in charge lined up. They’re waiting on all of the approvals first. Probably in the next week or two.

    #372104

    Columbusite
    Member

    Walker wrote >>

    Columbusite wrote >>
    The question is: why are there so few of these kind of people now? I really don’t know why our pool of moneyed urban pioneers basically dried up after the success of the Short North.

    Uhm… A lot of them are still in the Short North.

    So out of all of the new residents from other cities there aren’t enough to join together and improve a block or two elsewhere? I don’t find that very likely.

    lilbit wrote >>

    Why is the city prioritizing this lot over those? Is there something I’m not getting?

    These are privately held properties. If the owners don’t want to sell you can’t do anything about it.
    You’re not the first to complain about it.

    What could we do to put pressure on owners and what have other cities done in this instance? The property owners of grass lots should at least be required to plant and maintain a garden on these lots and get fined if they don’t until the lot is developed, just like owners of abandoned buildings need to keep their buildings up to code. Once they’ve reached $X in unpaid fines then the city could then take the property for their failure to comply in the maintenance of said lot. Of course, the owner of an unsightly empty lot could allow the neighborhood to plant and maintain the garden if he/she doesn’t want to.

    #372105
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Columbusite wrote >>
    So out of all of the new residents from other cities there aren’t enough to join together and improve a block or two elsewhere? I don’t find that very likely.

    Sure, there are plenty of people who are looking to revitalize neighborhoods. Probably moreso than there were in the Short North in the 80s. The “problem” is that they’re now spread out between Weinland Park, King Lincoln, OTE, Merion Village, Hungarian Village, Franklinton, The Hilltop, Highland West, Old Oaks, Ganthers Place and at least a dozen other areas.

    And I put “problem” in quotes because I really don’t see that being a bad thing… it’s just going to take longer than armchair/simcity urbanists want it to.

    Anywa, if you think that the two decades spent transforming the Short North from 1980 to 2000 took any less than two decades, then I think you have distorted sense of time on how long neighborhood changes actually take.

    Otherwise… buy a house and enjoy the ride. ;)

    #372106

    anillo
    Participant

    Columbusite wrote >>
    What could we do to put pressure on owners and what have other cities done in this instance? The property owners of grass lots should at least be required to plant and maintain a garden on these lots and get fined if they don’t until the lot is developed, just like owners of abandoned buildings need to keep their buildings up to code. Once they’ve reached $X in unpaid fines then the city could then take the property for their failure to comply in the maintenance of said lot. Of course, the owner of an unsightly empty lot could allow the neighborhood to plant and maintain the garden if he/she doesn’t want to.

    That’d be nice. At least in certain places like the SN.

    #372107
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    More details on this development, here:

    CHP Announces “NoBo on Long” Condo Development

    #372108
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    We’re really hype about this. We can see that site from our house.

    Just in the year since we’ve moved here, 3 other houses have been bought and rehabbed on our street (21st) and now that old building is being replaced just catty corner from us. So, just to support what Walker says, this neighborhood is a good investment. If we had even two dimes to rub together we’d be buying up everything we could get our hands on.

    #372109

    Pro Se
    Participant

    I am impressed w/ the condos, which seem to blend well with the block. I would love to see where else they are looking for the next phase. That said, the process to restore this corridor will take time and private investment. Public policy initiatives, though helpful, only go so far, though they do serve as a catalyst for the private investment necessary to bring about the comprehensive change by stabilizing the market and reducing risk. That process is clearly in the works in this neighborhood. We all recognize that there are a good many vacant and unsightly lots on E. Long Street but it makes little sense to complain about them to the extent they are privately held or otherwise encumbered. Time and market forces will slowly work out these “kinks.”

    #372110
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Pro Se wrote >>
    That said, the process to restore this corridor will take time and private investment. Public policy initiatives, though helpful, only go so far, though they do serve as a catalyst for the private investment necessary to bring about the comprehensive change by stabilizing the market and reducing risk. That process is clearly in the works in this neighborhood.

    Definitely. The single-family-home type of private development doesn’t always get as much press as the announcement of new larger development (public or private) but watching homes get rehabbed is an ongoing process around here. There’s a great home at the SW corner of Monroe & Long that is looking almost full renovated (on the outside at least) and our neighbors across the street from us just added a nice new front porch to their home.

    We need to get on the ball with some curb appeal for our place. ;) Ha!

    #372111

    NOBOPatriot
    Participant

    make sure you plant plenty of boxwoods – smell nice and like the urban ecosystem

Viewing 11 posts - 16 through 26 (of 26 total)

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