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New Three-Story Building Proposed for Prescott at Pearl in Italian Village

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion New Three-Story Building Proposed for Prescott at Pearl in Italian Village

This topic contains 59 replies, has 21 voices, and was last updated by  Nancy H 3 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 60 total)
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  • #548524

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    Liner Notes said:
    Personally, I don’t have anything against the size of this project. I do think the design is a bit uninviting though. However, it isn’t “right behind a 5 story” building. It would sit to the east of a 2 story building that faces High St., west of a 2 story double with a very large yard, south of 2 story multi-family building, and north of both a single story and 2 story buildings. (The Hub is not far away, I know.) So just consider that this project would be the tallest structure on this block which is essentially at the corners of three alleys. Is it the best design?

    1. Yes the lots will fill. But I think you will see even more scrutiny from residents and commissions as to what buildings get replaced and where. A forward thinking community would set out now to evaluate the stock of contributing vs. non-contributing properties to find potential opportunities for new development.

    2. I don’t see development slowing to a halt in the SN as a result of outcry or restrictions. Nor do I see anything negative about developers moving into neighborhoods such as Franklinton. Isn’t more than one trendy neighborhood desirable for Columbus?

    Okay, so at most, it’s half a block away from Hubbard, and about the same distance from High. Hubbard’s garage is against 2-story residential buildings, and the main building is against a 3-story. Both buildings run along Pearl. I don’t see too much, if any, difference.

    1. Scrutinizing proposals and designs is fine. I just don’t get how it’s consistent to approve an 11-story building on one block that will be significantly higher than adjacent buildings, but be against a 3 story on another in the same neighborhood within a block of the same main thoroughfare, especially when it’s only slightly higher than its surroundings.

    2. Maybe, maybe not. I actually think that it’s more likely that costs to build in the SN will force new construction to get larger/more dense over time, since economics will come more and more into play. If developers can’t build those projects, they will move elsewhere where the economics and community desires are more closely matched. Nothing wrong with that, and I think places like Franklinton would absolutely be thrilled to have them.

    #548526
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Liner Notes said:
    So just consider that this project would be the tallest structure on this block which is essentially at the corners of three alleys. Is it the best design?

    Does uniform building heights make for the best neighborhood?

    #548527

    InnerCore
    Participant

    jbcmh81 said:
    Okay, so at most, it’s half a block away from Hubbard, and about the same distance from High. Hubbard’s garage is against 2-story residential buildings, and the main building is against a 3-story. Both buildings run along Pearl. I don’t see too much, if any, difference.

    1. Scrutinizing proposals and designs is fine. I just don’t get how it’s consistent to approve an 11-story building on one block that will be significantly higher than adjacent buildings, but be against a 3 story on another in the same neighborhood within a block of the same main thoroughfare, especially when it’s only slightly higher than its surroundings.

    Most of that is due to the inconsistent zoning where officials don’t want stability but instead want ambiguity leaving them more power and control.

    Most places would simply come up with a responsible zoning plan and make everything along high say 8 – 10 stories, step that down to 5 stories on the next block then down to 3. That way when you move into an area you have stability and can simply look and see what could be built around you. If you don’t like 10 story buildings then move away from where they’re allowed.

    Meanwhile developers and owners can clearly evaluate the cost of land as they know the maximum allowed. If I’m a developer and I’m buying land in SN how can I accurately asses the value? I purchase thinking I can put a 6 story building but then people arbitrarily argue and now I can only put 2 stories.

    Instead they seem to play this game where they can pick and choose what goes where at will which leads to a lot of inefficiency and corruption.

    jbcmh81 said:2. Maybe, maybe not. I actually think that it’s more likely that costs to build in the SN will force new construction to get larger/more dense over time, since economics will come more and more into play. If developers can’t build those projects, they will move elsewhere where the economics and community desires are more closely matched. Nothing wrong with that, and I think places like Franklinton would absolutely be thrilled to have them.

    Agreed. Franklinton’s comeback will be measured in decades not years. As SN gets more popular developers will build up and out. They aren’t going to simply pick up and move to another neighborhood. Before then there will be a fight with the single family homes in SN. They’ll either fight to remain in which case they’ll become extremely expensive or development will take over and they’ll become more dense multifamily.

    #548528
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    mbeaumont said:
    That being said, I was driving through the Hilltop the other day and man does that area have so much good building stock. That neighborhood has the potential to really be killer someday.

    Columbus has a lot of great commercial arteries with so much potential for something better. Most of them have some existing businesses, but plenty of vacancies or buildings in disrepair. I don’t think all of them necessarily need boutique jean retailers or fine dining, but a mix of local-centric businesses/services with a few destination draws to bring in outsiders (similar to DF West) could be highly beneficial for West Broad, Sullivant, South Parsons, East Main Street (before Bexley), Long Street, Mount Vernon, East Fifth, Cleveland Avenue, South High, etc.

    #548529
    ntn
    ntn
    Participant

    Walker said:
    Does uniform building heights make for the best neighborhood?

    EXACTLY!!!

    Mbeaumont(I believe) and myself are in the minority of the IVS that welcome diversity in height and materials in the neighborhood. The general sentiment being that developments over 3 stories covered in anything other than red brick boils the blood.

    #548530
    ntn
    ntn
    Participant

    #548531

    MBT
    Participant

    ntn said:
    EXACTLY!!!

    Mbeaumont(I believe) and myself are in the minority of the IVS that welcome diversity in height and materials in the neighborhood. The general sentiment being that developments over 3 stories covered in anything other than red brick boils the blood.

    You’re not alone – a minority perhaps, but as an IV resident, I agree that diversity from an architectural standpoint is what gives any neighborhood character.

    What’s often more disappointing than seeing great projects struggle to see daylight because of cosmetic issues is realizing how many great projects are marginalized from the start in an effort to meet certain expectations.

    #548533
    Liner Notes
    Liner Notes
    Participant

    Walker said:
    Does uniform building heights make for the best neighborhood?

    Not necessarily. But stakeholders and community leaders did put guidelines in place to make sure that buildings fit within the fabric of the Short North corridor. It wasn’t me. ;)

    ntn said:

    The general sentiment being that developments over 3 stories covered in anything other than red brick boils the blood.

    And yet, what you see in the renderings posted a few pages back is a 3 story red brick building.

    #548534

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    ntn said:
    I could not do your job without daily tirades about the likes of those people. My version of CU would most likely end in a fiery crash.

    Good work on constantly maintaining composure!

    +1

    I occasionally check in on the Facebook discussions for these stories and am always impressed by the consistently positive CU replies in the face of such unbridled and often misinformed negativity.

    #548535

    News
    Participant

    Proposal Calls for 24 Units at Prescott and Pearl in Italian Village
    Published on February 27, 2014 12:25 pm
    By: Brent Warren

    A proposal to build a four-story, 24-unit apartment building at the corner of East Prescott and North Pearl Streets will be presented to the Italian Village Society at their March 11th meeting.

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/proposal-calls-for-24-units-at-prescott-and-pearl-in-italian-village-bw1

    #1037210

    Pablo
    Participant

    Looks like site clearing is underway – is the project moving forward or is this just preliminary work?

    Untitled

    #1037216
    Brent Warren
    Brent Warren
    Participant

    Yes, it was approved and last I checked they were planning on starting construction in September.

    #1061674
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster
    #1095103
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Haven’t taken any photos back here in awhile. Looking good!

    LINK: https://www.columbusunderground.com/construction-roundup-september-2015

    Extra photos:

    #1100498

    Nancy H
    Participant

    Thought I would bump this, since I walk past this project every day on my way to and from work.

    There are a few cars and bikes in the parking garage in the evening, so I assume residents are now moving into finished units.

    Units are (as usual) small and expensive. From Borror’s website:
    Price: starting at $959
    Square Feet: 463 – 1000
    Bedrooms: Studio – 1+
    Stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors, granite countertops, washer and dryer included, covered and secure garage parking, keyless entry, pets welcome (with restrictions and extra fees)

    They added quite a bit of exterior lighting, which was much needed. The corner of Prescott and Pearl was a dark, dank, scary kind of place at night. They also did a nice job blacktopping the intersection as well as parts of Pearl and Prescott. Also like the fact that they incorporated a place for their dumpster inside the building, rather than plopping it down in Pearl Alley. Pearl is getting lots of new residential, so fewer trash containers will make it a more pleasant walkable street.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 60 total)

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