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New 11-Story Office Building in The Short North

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development New 11-Story Office Building in The Short North

Viewing 15 posts - 91 through 105 (of 168 total)
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  • #1100788

    ohbr
    Participant

    The official county webpage (who owns the property) says:

    The hotel will feature a 28-story tower filled with 600 guest rooms positioned atop a four-story podium of ballrooms, meeting space, retail space, and lobby. The hotel will feature a rooftop bar as well as underground connections to the Cleveland Convention Center and the Global Center for Health Innovation.

    #1100840

    JMan
    Participant

    “This is Cbus,remember.” We shouldn’t have to say that to ourselves. We have the population base. Don’t we deserve what our peers have? Don’t we have any ambition.

    #1100845

    Nancy H
    Participant

    It is not so much what we deserve as what we are willing to pay for. Obviously Cleveland residents are willing to pay, as indicated in this part of ohbr’s post further back

    “… $21.5 million in contracts for the taxpayer-financed, 27-story convention center hotel…”

    #1100921

    Roger846
    Participant

    “This is Cbus,remember.” We shouldn’t have to say that to ourselves. We have the population base. Don’t we deserve what our peers have? Don’t we have any ambition.

    We have a limited 6-story brick box kind of ambition. :-)

    #1101319
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    “This is Cbus,remember.” We shouldn’t have to say that to ourselves. We have the population base. Don’t we deserve what our peers have? Don’t we have any ambition.

    yes, show your out of town friends a good time, gaze upon our impressive steel erections. When did the SN change from being a neighborhood with character(s)to a destination for lookie loos and the idle class….seriously

    #1101564

    Nancy H
    Participant

    Bumping this because it is on the VVC agenda for this evening.

    The original proposal at 11 stories was reduced to 9. Reading the commissioner’s comments from the October 8th meeting, it sounds like it will probably end up down around 6 or 7 stories.

    VVC agenda, including the commissioner’s comments available for viewing here

    https://columbus.gov/planning/VVC/

    @ Walker – Any chance of getting visuals of the redesign? I, for one, would love to see the “view from Goodale Park” that was requested in a prior VVC meeting. Even if this goes down to 5 or 6 stories it will be quite visible from the park. Victorian Gate (condos/apartments along Park Street) is mostly 3 stories.

    #1101566

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    If this gets reduced to 6 stories, the commission needs replaced. I’m tired of small town thinking preventing this city from moving forward, and the constant reduction in density is holding us back. People are making a lot of snide and sarcastic comments recently about the height complaints, but height is less the issue than the number of units in each building. Columbus already has a huge housing supply problem that is WAY underserving the actual population growth, let alone the population that may want to move into the city. This keeps prices higher than they need to be for everyone and prevents urban neighborhoods from reaching their potential vibrancy. Shame on the members for only considering the hurt feelings of neighbors who think anything taller than a super Wal-mart is bad for the neighborhood, while the only reason their neighborhood can attract any projects at all is because it is not built like Hilliard-Rome Road. And yes, this is a bit hyperbolic, but come on.

    #1101568
    Josh Lapp
    Josh Lapp
    Participant

    If this gets reduced to 6 stories, the commission needs replaced. I’m tired of small town thinking preventing this city from moving forward, and the constant reduction in density is holding us back. People are making a lot of snide and sarcastic comments recently about the height complaints, but height is less the issue than the number of units in each building. Columbus already has a huge housing supply problem that is WAY underserving the actual population growth, let alone the population that may want to move into the city. This keeps prices higher than they need to be for everyone and prevents urban neighborhoods from reaching their potential vibrancy. Shame on the members for only considering the hurt feelings of neighbors who think anything taller than a super Wal-mart is bad for the neighborhood.

    Whether or not you like it, the commissions are put in place to preserve and protect the historic nature of the neighborhoods as well as uphold the standards that have been put in place with community, developer and historic preservationist input. It shouldn’t come as a concern that height is frequently an issue as it is addressed specifically in the standards. The reduction of a few stories in height on this building or any other does not spell the end to Columbus.

    #1101574

    Pablo
    Participant

    ^^It’s an office building, not housing.

    #1101583

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    ^^It’s an office building, not housing.

    I know that, but it’s still a reduction in density and therefore vibrancy. It’s not like this isn’t happening with residential projects. Look no further than down the street.

    #1101592

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>jbcmh81 wrote:</div>
    If this gets reduced to 6 stories, the commission needs replaced. I’m tired of small town thinking preventing this city from moving forward, and the constant reduction in density is holding us back. People are making a lot of snide and sarcastic comments recently about the height complaints, but height is less the issue than the number of units in each building. Columbus already has a huge housing supply problem that is WAY underserving the actual population growth, let alone the population that may want to move into the city. This keeps prices higher than they need to be for everyone and prevents urban neighborhoods from reaching their potential vibrancy. Shame on the members for only considering the hurt feelings of neighbors who think anything taller than a super Wal-mart is bad for the neighborhood.

    Whether or not you like it, the commissions are put in place to preserve and protect the historic nature of the neighborhoods as well as uphold the standards that have been put in place with community, developer and historic preservationist input. It shouldn’t come as a concern that height is frequently an issue as it is addressed specifically in the standards. The reduction of a few stories in height on this building or any other does not spell the end to Columbus.

    This isn’t about preserving history, though. No existing buildings are being threatened. And the issue of height seems silly when we are talking about the city’s premier and primary commercial corridor, and when that corridor already has buildings of the proposed height within a few blocks of this location. That seal was already broken, and it was broken decades ago. How do those taller buildings take away from the historic character of the residential neighborhoods nearby? I could understand if this was about preventing the tear down of historically significant housing or existing retail buildings, but it isn’t. I could understand if this was on Neil Avenue between single-family homes, but it is not. I could even understand if the proposed use, design or layout was in some way out of place or detrimental to the feel of High Street, but again, as far as I can tell, that isn’t the case either. The commission made this decision seemingly on the view that it is too dense for part of Columbus’ already most densely populated and successful corridor. If the commission is interested in preventing some imagine tipping-point density, it is very late to the game. So no, a few stories in reduction does not spell the end of Columbus, whatever that means. But nor does the proposal at its original height spell the end of the historic nature of Victorian Village, even remotely.

    #1101593

    ohbr
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Pablo wrote:</div>
    ^^It’s an office building, not housing.

    I know that, but it’s still a reduction in density and therefore vibrancy. It’s not like this isn’t happening with residential projects. Look no further than down the street.

    While I liked the 11 story proposal, it is up to the commission and the commission has a duty to serve its community and its goals, not the goals of those outside of it. I doubt that the reduction in height in this office building is going to affect the vibrancy of the Short North in a detrimental way. Now, the loss of a rooftop bar/restaurant, that we can lament about if it is removed from this proposal. So, they couldn’t build this in the Short North. They can try again downtown where vibrancy is needed significantly more.

    #1101596
    dalias
    dalias
    Participant

    If this gets reduced to 6 stories, the commission needs replaced. I’m tired of small town thinking preventing this city from moving forward, and the constant reduction in density is holding us back. People are making a lot of snide and sarcastic comments recently about the height complaints, but height is less the issue than the number of units in each building. Columbus already has a huge housing supply problem that is WAY underserving the actual population growth, let alone the population that may want to move into the city. This keeps prices higher than they need to be for everyone and prevents urban neighborhoods from reaching their potential vibrancy. Shame on the members for only considering the hurt feelings of neighbors who think anything taller than a super Wal-mart is bad for the neighborhood, while the only reason their neighborhood can attract any projects at all is because it is not built like Hilliard-Rome Road. And yes, this is a bit hyperbolic, but come on.

    Have you ever read the Short North Guidelines? You should seriously read them because a lot of people, including residents, developers, architects and others put a lot of non-interwebs time into them? It is the guidelines that the committees are actually charged with adhering to. Every developer who enters the neighborhood is aware of them. Just because the committees do not give you your demand for height does not mean they are not doing their job. They are responding to the guidelines, the residents and other factors in the neighborhood. Their job is not to prevent you from lying in a fetal position crying because you once again did not get your tall building.

    #1101597
    Eridony
    Eridony
    Participant

    Seeing these large projects getting reduced to half their original planned size is disheartening.

    #1101598

    WJT
    Participant

    The commission is technically an advisory board, is it not? Could a developer just go around them-isn’t it ultimately up to city council? If so, has this been done before? When was the last time the ‘standards of the community’ were defined?

    Also, I would think that this really should not be a decision for a Victorian Village commission anyway. High Street along the Short North should really be a separate entity-not part of VV, not part of Italian Village either.

    *OMG, reading the comments from the commissioners on this proposal and the White Castle proposal..who are these people? They should not be making any decisions about development on the hottest Corridor in Columbus with remarks like these!:

    The current proposal seems Las Vegas size

    Is not sure that all these functions (residential, retail, office, and parking) can occur on the same lot.

    • Commissioner Conyers – Design improvements have been made at the base of the building. The amount of transparency at the dock still requires more work. In looking at the existing buildings throughout the district and this location, the building is tall. It is probably between 2 and 3 stories too tall. The office space use is very good. The project is going in the right direction, but the height needs to be addressed. • Commissioner Borchers – Is excited about the architectural design, but the massing needs discussion. The proposed height is taller than the Jackson, which is too tall. Multiple stories need to be removed from the design. Some of the glass that wrapped the corner of the building should be returned to the design. • Commissioner Kotheimer – The curtain-wall is not there yet, needs more work. The cleanness of the front design is better, but the additional mullions on the side create a “plaid” look that is not good. The building needs to be designed and constructed with high-quality materials that will ensure the building holds up to the future. • Commissioner Hissem – The existing design is too tall. The finishes and materials can be worked out later, but at least 2 stories need to be removed from the building design. • Commissioner Decker – Agrees with other Commissioner comments. The majority of changes to the current design are good. The Shirt North Design Guidelines are important, and looking at this proposal it is clear that the building is probably 2 stories too tall. Supports the concept of the project; daytime commercial workers are important for the neighborhood, but the new building should not overwhelm the surrounding historic structures

    ok…so it is too tall by 2 floors…but now it will be even smaller?

Viewing 15 posts - 91 through 105 (of 168 total)

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