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Need for Anchor Skyscraper

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development Need for Anchor Skyscraper

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 33 total)
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  • #997887
    combs1ng
    combs1ng
    Participant

    So I’m sure I will have several people argue this and I have seen related articles in the past – that being said Columbus needs an anchor Skyscraper, let me explain:

    Columbus needs an anchoring skyscraper more than anything to define and exclaim to visitors/outsiders/WORLD that Columbus is taking off and that we are HERE! Psychological interpretation is EVERYTHING and it makes the world go round. It is why the media is so powerful, the stock market fluctuates, why the masses follow the few and why the East and West coasts get all the attention and the rest of the country is thought of as “farm folks”.
    Skyscrapers such as the Empire State Building, Sears Tower(I know it is called something else now), St. Louis Arch, Seattle Space Needle and CN Tower of Toronto are just a few which define the cities architectually in which they lie.
    Many people pass through Columbus on I-70 or I-71 and probably think meh… Columbus just another (for those who do not know it intimately) decent size city but don’t think much of it. If we had a Tower piercing the sky it brings wonder and awe to people. It overaxagerates its prescence but leaves a lasting impression on someone passing through or visiting and most importantly makes Columbus feel BIGGER(more worldly). The psychological impact on investors, politicians, toursits and convention/event planners will ultimately be worth more than the cost of a building which some may say is unnecessary at this time.
    Lastly, I just wanted to mention a couple quick antecdotes which help me in my opinion over this matter. The first anecdote was from a work colleague from Chicago. He was originally from Northern Indiana and had never been to Columbus. When he came here from Chicago for work he was amazed that the Columbus area had alost 2 million residents and that we had a downtown. This proves our need for a little more identity. Now this second part really gets me going and I don’t know if it is more of a question of personal ignorance or East Coast perception but here I go:
    My parents took an East Coast trip last fall. They went up to Maine and came down through New York, including New York City. While my father was speaking to a local in New York City he mentioned they were from Columbus Ohio. The lady looked up at him and said “Oh, I know someone from Ohio her name is ……., do you know her? My father looked right back at her and said “you do know there is about 12 million people living in Ohio”. When he told me that I could not believe it, as if we all know eachother in this state.

    In my conclusion – I hope I did not sound angry or bitter but the lack of Columbus and Midwest recognition is amazing. I sure would love to hear how the rest of you feel about this topic. If you have some cool looking building ideas or plans throw them on here. I always felt we should design a huge skyscraper somehow incorporating the idea of “Heart of it All” since that is Ohio!!

    #997920
    Jason Powell
    Jason Powell
    Participant

    I like highrise buildings as much as the next guy and would love to see another one – 50+ floors, but the demand for such a building simply is not there. Our best bet is corportate expansion and/or relocation. To elaborate on a few of your points.

    1. Columbus does not need one defining skyscraper to let the world know “that we are here” and that we are a big city. It is what is experienced at the street level that matters most and we still have a long way to go in that dept. though we have made strides in the past 10 years or so.

    2. The Space Needle and St Louis Arch are oranges to the Empire State apple. They are monuments, not buildings and I agree that we need something similar here in Columbus. It would go a long way for defining our identity.

    3. For those driving through Columbus, or any city for that matter, to think that the city is just meh from the looks of it have an opinion not worthy of considering. If they do not take the time to get off the highway and explore the city, then their opinion is void.

    4. Your friend from Indiana did not know that Columbus had a downtown!!?? I would consider that opinion an outlier.

    I think great walkable neighborhoods with great cultural amenities should be the priority. Businesses typically follow those things because that is what everyone, employees and employers, want to be a part of in the end. You cannot have one without the other in order for Columbus to be known as a great city. The skyscrapers will come, hopefully sooner rather than later.

    #997926

    heresthecasey
    Participant
    #997987
    MichaelC
    MichaelC
    Participant

    We need many mid-rises and short-rises and no high rises.

    I once agreed with the OP, but Walker’s arguments about the above are persuasive.

    The demand for (new) Downtown office space just isn’t there to the degree that it would make sense from a non-aesthetic point of view to build a 50-story building anytime soon.

    It would’ve been nice if the massive Chase complex, for example, had been configured for Downtown Cbus. That sort of need might require another office tower. But a need like that isn’t approaching at the moment.

    Nationwide’s displacement of workers Downtown did result in a new office building–of the shorter variety. More of that is what we’ll see and, imo, what we need.

    #997993

    citywalker
    Participant

    I am not against the idea of doing something big, but assuming the money for the project came from the city, I’d rather spend it on something that can benefit us directly like (to name a few):

    1. Create an inner-city bicycle innerbelt (+ greenspace) by strategically capping the car highway innerbelt (the vented/cap version for cost reasons). Sharrows and painted bike lines don’t do much to make us a bicycling mecca.

    2. Becoming the largest US city to be Dark-Sky compliant. Imagine if we could see stars at night inside 270.
    Theoretically its possible by turning off all the lights at night. Practically, it’s possible by creating and enforcing regulations that control outside night lighting. I’d be for subsidizing the conversion to better lighting over time.

    http://www.darksky.org/

    3. Creating/promoting wildlife reserves within the city for bats, monarchs (create giant fields of milkweed), etc. I’m talking big enough that it would attract both residents and visitors.

    http://www.batcon.org/index.php/get-involved/visit-a-bat-location/congress-avenue-bridge/subcategory.html?layout=subcategory

    4. Like Cummins Engines does in Columbus Indiana, create a fund that would be used to hire top designers from around the world to design public buildings and landscaping. I am not talking about trophy architecture (like the convention center) but I would want something more interesting than usually gets built here. I’d also want some sort of commission that would filter out the ego-sculptures and focus on innovative design that also functions and is pedestrian friendly.

    http://www.columbus.in.us/listings/index.cfm?catId=336

    #998015

    Graybeak
    Participant

    I am not sure why the city would fund a 50 story building. Or any of those other initiatives to be honest.

    #998017

    Lu
    Participant

    DC and Paris are prime examples of how tall buildings aren’t necessary to create a great city.

    At the other extreme, look at Charlotte, where skyscrapers stand next to empty fields and parking lots.

    Downtown DC is much more pleasant, IMHO.

    #998020

    citywalker
    Participant

    I am not sure why the city would fund … any of those other initiatives to be honest.

    In general the improvement of quality of life. In the cases of #2 and #3 because the city stole the night sky and animal habitat and can help to bring it back.

    #998046

    buckeye54
    Participant

    It would’ve been nice if the massive Chase complex, for example, had been configured for Downtown Cbus. That sort of need might require another office tower. But a need like that isn’t approaching at the moment.

    In my opinion, that is partially the issue. Columbus has potential for more skyscrapers but companies such as limited,chase,abercrombie,cardinal health,bob evans,wendys,safeauto, etc… have all decided to be located on sprawling suburban style campuses. It’s my understanding that if chase would have put their polaris campus downtown then it would have easily been the largest skyscraper in the city. Hopefully with the growing trend for younger people to want to live and work in urban environments, some of these companies will eventually gravitate towards downtown especially if it is a difference maker in attracting young talent.

    In some ways it’s even more unfathomable to me that with the amount of retailers and restaurant chains we have headquartered in the metro area, almost none of them have any sort of presence in the downtown area. Hopefully the amount of residential infill that is occurring will draw them.

    #998065

    columbusmike
    Participant

    DC and Paris are prime examples of how tall buildings aren’t necessary to create a great city.

    Portland, Oregon is probably the best comparison to Columbus…

    #998076

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    I like the comment about The Shard in London, from one of its haters – he loved the view from that building because it was the only place in London where you could not see that building.

    #998078

    columbusmike
    Participant

    It’s my understanding that if chase would have put their polaris campus downtown then it would have easily been the largest skyscraper in the city.

    In fact, it would be approximately the same size as the Empire State Building.

    #998096
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    I am not sure why the city would fund a 50 story building. Or any of those other initiatives to be honest.

    Um. yeah.

    #998115

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    I like the comment about The Shard in London, from one of its haters – he loved the view from that building because it was the only place in London where you could not see that building.

    The 19th century French writer Guy de Maupassant hated the Eiffel Tower but still went to its restaurant every day. When asked why, he said it was because it is the only place in Paris were one cannot see the structure.

    #998116

    MHJ
    Participant

    4. Your friend from Indiana did not know that Columbus had a downtown!!?? I would consider that opinion an outlier.

    It’s not. Every person who has visited me in Columbus, down to a person, since I moved here a decade ago was surprised that it had a downtown. That’s people from Chicagoland, DC, and many other parts of the country. People think that Columbus is a college town like Bloomington, IN, or Athens, GA, or at most a sleepy capital city like Madison or Springfield.

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