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Natural Gas Drilling / Fracking in Ohio

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Natural Gas Drilling / Fracking in Ohio

Viewing 15 posts - 736 through 750 (of 752 total)
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  • #1048338

    News
    Participant

    Kasich: Proposed frack tax ‘a complete and total ripoff’
    Oct 29, 2014, 10:39am EDT
    Tom Knox
    Reporter – Columbus Business First

    Ohio Gov. John Kasich had strong words for the oil and gas industry in a Tuesday candidate forum. The state legislature has feuded over how much the raise the state’s oil and gas severance tax during the last two years. The House of Representatives passed H.B. 375 in May, but it stalled in the Senate as Kasich rebuked it as being too lenient.

    READ MORE: http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/blog/ohio-energy-inc/2014/10/kasich-proposed-frack-tax-a-complete-and-total.html

    #1048408

    gramarye
    Participant

    1. Let’s see, natural gas or coal fired plants? Environmentalists want neither. Ok, let’s do wind and solar and hydro. Oh, wait, not every area of the country can create enough electricity using those sources..let alone the time it would take to construct or the cost to every user of that electricity. Let’s not heat our homes with natural gas. Can’t use propane either (a derivative of oil), or heating oil (again, a derivative of oil). Shall we use electricity? Oh wait, the wind/solar/hydro already can’t provide for our needs, how is it going to provide the extra we now need for all of those folks switching from gas to electricity? Maybe we will all get our own windmill?

    We’re actually closer to grid parity on solar than is often appreciated. In fact, we’re close enough now for the conventional power industry to feel threatened by it, which is why they’re firing up their lobbying machines to try to get net metering laws rewritten and make solar less attractive to end users. The current net metering framework is one of those rare legal rules that is actually written with broad public good in mind rather than the good of a well-funded corporate lobby, so expect to see it rewritten to be more expensive for everyone who isn’t a utility company in the near future.

    However, that also only overlaps partially with the subject of this thread. While there is some overlap in what we use electricity for and what we use natural gas for, there are also large areas of non-overlap in both directions. That could change over time, but horizontal drilling is a technology of the present, not the future; even the more optimistic fracking prognosticators in OOGA (the Ohio Oil & Gas Association) don’t see it as a 100-year phenomenon.

    3. Pipeline networks? That is a joke. The Country is awash in pipelines that are already there and have been for decades. A lot of them are for gasoline….another evil we should get rid of…and another derivative of oil.

    Pipelines cannot be so easily switched. Pipeline capacities are strained to the breaking point right now; we have more upstream supply (i.e., raw materials coming out of the ground) than pipeline capacity to handle it at the moment. I was at a symposium at Marietta College last week (at which about 400 of the 1500 undergraduates right now are majoring in petroleum engineering, and they just began a new, separate program in land & energy management with another 120-ish people … Marietta is basically FrackU) at which the general consensus of the panel was that midstream capacity wouldn’t catch up with supply for another 2-3 years. We also have increasing amounts of ethane stored in the pipelines themselves, which basically nobody wants but which cannot be simply flared, and which clogs capacity that could otherwise be used to bring gas from the wells to cracker and processing plants. If we are “awash in pipelines,” the people in the industry seem somewhat unaware of it.

    #1048480

    Mister Shifter
    Participant

    Fracking-well explosion forces 400 families from their homes in Eastern Ohio.

    http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2014/10/29/well_explosion.html

    #1048481
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Yeesh. That’s not good.

    #1048484

    Scioto Tower
    Participant

    We’re actually closer to grid parity on solar than is often appreciated. In fact, we’re close enough now for the conventional power industry to feel threatened by it, which is why they’re firing up their lobbying machines to try to get net metering laws rewritten and make solar less attractive to end users. The current net metering framework is one of those rare legal rules that is actually written with broad public good in mind rather than the good of a well-funded corporate lobby, so expect to see it rewritten to be more expensive for everyone who isn’t a utility company in the near future.
    However, that also only overlaps partially with the subject of this thread. While there is some overlap in what we use electricity for and what we use natural gas for, there are also large areas of non-overlap in both directions. That could change over time, but horizontal drilling is a technology of the present, not the future; even the more optimistic fracking prognosticators in OOGA (the Ohio Oil & Gas Association) don’t see it as a 100-year phenomenon.

    By “grid parity”, do you mean that there is almost enough solar power produced currently to match that of fossil fuels? Out of curiosity, where did you read that or obtain that information?

    Horizontal drilling (more specifically, shale drilling) is almost certainly a technology of the present. At some point in time, fossil fuels will run out. About 8 years ago, everyone was saying it was the end of “cheap oil” and we were at the peak of oil production. This caused companies to spend more money on research and find better ways to tap oil/gas…now look where we are, the US is awash in both. If people like the woman in that video had their way, oil would be near $150/bbl and gas would be easily nearing $10/mcf. What would that do to the economy? What would that do to foreign policy? I have no doubt when the time comes that the best technology in the world can’t get anymore oil/gas out of the ground, we will have to use renewable resources…and we will pay the financial cost of that, we will have no choice. I don’t doubt that renewables or some other less polluting technology will be cheaper before that happens, which will be good for everyone and the economy.

    My basic point is people like that woman are selfish and they talk loud for everyone to hear…only to be hypocrites when they use the very resources they are speaking against. There is no give and take with these folks, they want a certain industry stopped no matter the consequences.

    My point with the pipelines was there are so many in the ground now, and she is complaining shale drilling will put more in the ground…like it is something brand new.

    Again, everything has risks.

    #1048634

    News
    Participant

    Gas Well Blowout Worries Eastern Ohio Residents
    October 31, 2014
    by Sam Hendren

    The quick response of a Texas firm stopped a dangerous leak at a natural gas well in eastern Ohio Wednesday morning. Officials say some sort of mechanical failure allowed methane to rush out of a production well near Steubenville.

    READ MORE: http://wosu.org/2012/news/2014/10/31/gas-well-blowout-worries-eastern-ohio-residents/

    #1048654

    goldenidea
    Participant

    From the WOSU & Dispatch articles:

    “We’ve got these wells going up all around us and we’re wondering, anytime we have a problem are we going to have to call Texas and wait for somebody to come? Why don’t we have somebody here locally who’s qualified to fix that problem?”

    The reason no entities are available locally to bring in a blow-out or wild well like in Jefferson Co is because the people and equipment needed to contain one are very specialized. Boots & Coots and International Well Control (founded by Red Adair) are the two Houston-based firms specializing in this work. These two firms are called on to bring wild wells under control at locations world-wide. You may recall after Desert Storm, they were called on to bring 100s of Kuwaiti wild wells sabotaged at the war’s end by the Saddam Hussain’s loyalists under control, and did so in record time. As Marcellus and Utica development progresses, they might open a service facility somewhere here in the Appalachian Basin, but not yet apparently. Presently, there is not enough activity here to make that feasible.

    Some info on Red Adair: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Adair
    In 1968, there was a movie made about Red Adair called “Hellfighters” featuring John Wayne.

    #1048655

    gramarye
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>gramarye wrote:</div>
    We’re actually closer to grid parity on solar than is often appreciated. In fact, we’re close enough now for the conventional power industry to feel threatened by it, which is why they’re firing up their lobbying machines to try to get net metering laws rewritten and make solar less attractive to end users. The current net metering framework is one of those rare legal rules that is actually written with broad public good in mind rather than the good of a well-funded corporate lobby, so expect to see it rewritten to be more expensive for everyone who isn’t a utility company in the near future.<br>
    However, that also only overlaps partially with the subject of this thread. While there is some overlap in what we use electricity for and what we use natural gas for, there are also large areas of non-overlap in both directions. That could change over time, but horizontal drilling is a technology of the present, not the future; even the more optimistic fracking prognosticators in OOGA (the Ohio Oil & Gas Association) don’t see it as a 100-year phenomenon.

    By “grid parity”, do you mean that there is almost enough solar power produced currently to match that of fossil fuels? Out of curiosity, where did you read that or obtain that information?

    “Grid parity” is based on cost per kWh of electricity. It doesn’t measure quantity directly; I’m well aware that we have nowhere near enough installed solar capacity now to match our fossil fuel plants. However, when it’s possible to produce 1kW of electricity from solar for the same price as 1kW from fossil fuel, we say we’ve reached “grid parity.” We’re a lot closer than many people think, though Bloomberg just ran an article on it, so the fact is getting more mainstream attention:

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-10-29/while-you-were-getting-worked-up-over-oil-prices-this-just-happened-to-solar.html

    It’s an enormously consequential milestone because all the economic incentives that prompt people and companies to generate power conventionally today flip as soon as we reach grid parity.

    I have no doubt when the time comes that the best technology in the world can’t get anymore oil/gas out of the ground, we will have to use renewable resources…and we will pay the financial cost of that, we will have no choice. I don’t doubt that renewables or some other less polluting technology will be cheaper before that happens, which will be good for everyone and the economy.

    Heh. And that’s exactly what I was talking about above. We aren’t going to abandon oil and gas when we run out of oil and gas; we’re going to start scaling back massively on oil and gas when solar is cheaper (even if there’s still plenty of oil and gas out there), and that time may very well be measured in years, not decades. The price per kWh of solar has been following such a steeply downward trajectory that it’s coming close to Moore’s Law regarding computing power. Look at the final graph in that Bloomberg article.

    My point with the pipelines was there are so many in the ground now, and she is complaining shale drilling will put more in the ground…like it is something brand new.

    There are a lot of pipelines in the ground now, but it’s still not enough to meet demand. And like I said, a considerable amount of ethane byproduct is stored in the existing pipelines. Therefore, while I’m hardly taking the NEOGAP side–I have no objection to building more pipelines–that doesn’t mean I have to accept all arguments in favor of more pipelines. In fact, I can barely understand your argument even after you’ve tried to explain it twice–we need more pipelines because we already have so many?

    #1055121

    News
    Participant

    Out Of Control Fracking Well Displaces Eastern Ohio Families
    December 17, 2014
    by The Associated Press

    An out-of-control natural gas fracking well has kept 25 families from their homes for the past three days in eastern Ohio.

    READ MORE: http://wosu.org/2012/news/2014/12/17/control-fracking-well-displaces-eastern-ohio-families/

    #1055553

    News
    Participant

    Carroll County Gushes with Shale Energy Wealth
    Wednesday, December 17, 2014
    By Dan O’Brien

    CARROLLTON, Ohio — No natural gas well has evoked shouts of “Eureka!” that reverberated across Carroll County, a once pastoral place in east central Ohio. Nor is there one well, one drill site, with crude production so staggering that it stops oil barons in their tracks.

    READ MORE: http://businessjournaldaily.com/drilling-down/carroll-county-gushes-shale-energy-wealth-2014-12-17

    #1059135

    News
    Participant

    Seismological Study Confirms Fracking Caused Ohio Earthquakes
    January 15, 2015 7:50 am – Jesse Bethea

    A new study published in the Seismological Society of America has confirmed that fracking operations by the Hilcorp Energy company were responsible for a series of small earthquakes in Poland Township, Ohio. The earthquakes occurred in March of 2014 and ranged in magnitude between 2.1 and 3.0, large enough to be felt by people on the surface.

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/seismological-study-confirms-fracking-caused-ohio-earthquakes-jb1

    #1072088

    News
    Participant

    Fracking permits dry up in 1st week of April
    Apr 16, 2015, 12:34pm EDT UPDATED: Apr 16, 2015, 12:42pm EDT
    Tom Knox
    Reporter – Columbus Business First

    State regulators did not issue any new permits for horizontal drilling the first week of April.

    READ MORE: http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/blog/ohio-energy-inc/2015/04/fracking-permits-dry-up-in-ohio.html

    #1079917

    News
    Participant

    US EPA’S STUDY CONFIRMS WATER CONTAMINATION CAUSED BY FRACKING
    By Melanie Houston

    The US Environmental Protection Agency’s (US EPA) recently released study of fracking impacts to water clearly refutes the fracking industry’s long-standing claim that “there has not been one single confirmed case of water contamination related to hydraulic fracturing.”

    READ MORE: http://www.theoec.org/one-ohio/us-epa’s-study-confirms-water-contamination-caused-fracking

    #1079932

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    No. Shit. Sherlock. The Oil & Gas companies obviously depended on people being in the dark on science and legit research in order to make their money. They’ll then pack up and sneak out the back door just as people are waking up and realizing that they’ve been played for fools.

    Too bad we can’t sue the fuckers for everything and then use the money to buy a new Earth. Some lessons in this life seem to require painful realizations and all, but mother nature doesn’t usually give you too many second chances when it comes to not having enough sense to put your own health and well-being over fucking-up your own basic necessities.

    Americans in general will learn too late the hard way that they can’t eat and drink money.

    #1079938

    goldenidea
    Participant

    EPA Study of Fracking Finds ‘No Widespread, Systemic’ Pollution
    by Mark DrajemJim Snyder
    June 4, 2015 — 12:19 PM EDT Updated on June 4, 2015 — 2:34 PM EDT

    Hydraulic fracturing has contaminated some drinking water sources but the damage is not widespread, according to a landmark U.S. study of water pollution risks that has supporters of the drilling method declaring victory and foes saying it revealed reason for concern.
    The draft analysis by the Environmental Protection Agency, released Thursday after three years of study, looked at possible ways fracking could contaminate drinking water, from spills of fracking fluids to wastewater disposal.
    “We conclude there are above and below ground mechanisms by which hydraulic fracturing activities have the potential to impact drinking water resources,” the EPA said in the report. But, “we did not find evidence that these mechanisms have led to widespread, systemic impacts on drinking water resources.”
    The study was commissioned by Congress and represents the most comprehensive assessment yet of the safety of fracking, a technique that has led to a boom in domestic oil and gas production but also spawned persistent complaints about pollution. Fracking involves the injection of water, sand and chemicals underground to break apart shale rock and free trapped oil or gas.
    Water Resources
    Thomas Burke, the EPA’s top science adviser, told reporters that given thousands of wells drilled and fracked in the last few years, “the number of documented impacts on groundwater resources is relatively low.”
    Still, it’s not accurate to say that there have been no cases of contamination, he said.
    “There are instances where the fracking activity itself” led to water pollution, he said.
    The EPA looked at the potential for spills of fracking fluids, poor wastewater disposal or migration of chemicals shot underground.
    The American Petroleum Institute, an industry trade group, said the study was a validation of the safety of fracking. It said it showed existing oversight from state regulators is working.
    “Hydraulic fracturing is being done safely under the strong environmental stewardship of state regulators and industry best practices,” Erik Milito, API’s upstream group director, said in an e-mail.
    Bigger Risk
    When the study began much of the focus was on the risk that chemicals mixed in fracking fluids could flow through underground fissures and into underground water reservoirs. The study results show that might not be the biggest risk.
    “The process of fracking itself is one risk factor. But in fact it’s not the biggest one,” said Mark Brownstein, vice president of the Environmental Defense Fund. “Ongoing physical integrity of the wells and handling the millions of gallons of wastewater coming back to the surface after fracking, over the lifetime of each well, are even bigger challenges.”
    Amy Mall, a senior policy analyst for the Natural Resources Defense Council, said the study provides “solid science that fracking has contaminated drinking water across the country.”
    Mall said, however, that a lack of cooperation from industry meant EPA lacked key data necessary to fully assess its safety.
    Another environmental group, Earthworks, said EPA analysis points to the need for regulation.
    “Now the Obama administration, Congress, and state governments must act on that information to protect our drinking water, and stop perpetuating the oil and gas industry’s myth that fracking is safe,” said Lauren Pagel, Earthwork’s policy director, in an e-mail.
    The EPA said it analyzed more than 950 sources of information. The study included an analysis of industry-backed disclosures of the chemicals used in fracking, case-studies of local communities where homeowners feared their water wells were contaminated and a review of well construction.
    The EPA said as many as 30,000 fracked wells were drilled annually between 2011 to 2014, as oil production reached its highest level in more than three decades.
    “People in favor of drilling will see this as vindication,” said Rob Jackson, a Stanford University professor who has tested drinking water near fracking sites in Texas, Pennsylvania and other states. “People opposed to it will see this as a whitewash.”

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-06-04/u-s-epa-study-finds-only-limited-water-pollution-from-fracking

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