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Initiative to End Payments to Nationwide Arena

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Politics Initiative to End Payments to Nationwide Arena

Viewing 14 posts - 886 through 899 (of 899 total)
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  • #1023806

    IbrahimaSow
    Participant

    Same here! That much money for a bulding that dosen’t have as high return as it should is a bad investment. If we did cut that from our budget, we could actually effectively deal with the hunger and homelessness in our city- a rising poverty rate in a thriving city isn’t a success story to be proud about. Responsible and effective spending is what may keep our rainy fund on the rise, and potentially bring down taxes- or at the least costs. Let’s get that bad investment on the ballot next cycle!

    #1023914
    Caleb
    Caleb
    Participant

    Same here! That much money for a bulding that dosen’t have as high return as it should is a bad investment. If we did cut that from our budget, we could actually effectively deal with the hunger and homelessness in our city- a rising poverty rate in a thriving city isn’t a success story to be proud about. Responsible and effective spending is what may keep our rainy fund on the rise, and potentially bring down taxes- or at the least costs. Let’s get that bad investment on the ballot next cycle!

    So what exactly would we do with the casino tax? None of this is coming from YOUR taxes. It is coming from the casino tax. The city portion (not the education portion). The city has enough revenue to help the homeless and hunger in the city. That why their are developments around the city and improvements being made to help with the issues. What do you plan that we do? Build every homeless person a home and provide all the groceries to a hungry person for their life? A more effective way is to give them tools to help move into the work force and begin to provide for themselves. The casino tax, in my opinion, is being spent on a great asset that has reinvigorated the Arena District, Short North, and Downtown. That’s an asset that we can not lose.

    #1023917

    CB_downtowner
    Participant

    Same here! That much money for a bulding that dosen’t have as high return as it should is a bad investment. If we did cut that from our budget, we could actually effectively deal with the hunger and homelessness in our city- a rising poverty rate in a thriving city isn’t a success story to be proud about. Responsible and effective spending is what may keep our rainy fund on the rise, and potentially bring down taxes- or at the least costs. Let’s get that bad investment on the ballot next cycle!

    So a city void of any culture, attractions, or sites that bring lots of people to the downtown area.

    Do you think that cities that are void of these things live in a Utopian society where hunger and homelessness are solved?

    #1023923

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>IbrahimaSow wrote:</div>
    Same here! That much money for a bulding that dosen’t have as high return as it should is a bad investment. If we did cut that from our budget, we could actually effectively deal with the hunger and homelessness in our city- a rising poverty rate in a thriving city isn’t a success story to be proud about. Responsible and effective spending is what may keep our rainy fund on the rise, and potentially bring down taxes- or at the least costs. Let’s get that bad investment on the ballot next cycle!

    So a city void of any culture, attractions, or sites that bring lots of people to the downtown area.

    Do you think that cities that are void of these things live in a Utopian society where hunger and homelessness are solved?

    We already know what will happen to a city amenity put to a vote when the rate is even remotely questionable, even if that amenity has a long history of providing greater returns than investment. So you can probably guess what a vote about the arena would go like when the return is a bit more subjective. Many Columbus residents, and even more Franklin County residents, aren’t willing to put up money in keeping or building on established city amenities… well, not unless they’re totally free, anyway.

    #1024064

    gramarye
    Participant

    But yesterday, the manager — Xen Riggs — presented budget documents that show that Nationwide should eke out a $60,000 surplus when its fiscal year ends June 30. He then cautioned that next year, the arena likely will finish with a deficit of about $500,000.

    Both of those budgets include a $4 million public subsidy of casino tax dollars from the city of Columbus and Franklin County.

    What this really means is that the arena is operating at a deficit of about $3.94 million on a budget of $20.5 million this year and expects a deficit of $4.5 million next year.

    Now maybe that’s worth it if we’re generating more than $4 million in economic activity above what the arena could generate without that subsidy. That’s a more complex question, and probably somewhat difficult to objectively pin down. (And, of course, from a public fiscal perspective, you’d be looking for marginal net economic additional activity closer to $40 million, since only a portion of the increased activity flows back into the public treasury as taxes, but that’s not necessarily the only relevant frame of reference.)

    #1024088
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    So a city void of any culture, attractions, or sites that bring lots of people to the downtown area.

    Do you think that cities that are void of these things live in a Utopian society where hunger and homelessness are solved?

    I’m in favor of voting on them. I’m also in favor of not bailing out private interests, particularly in a way that the private investor walks away with the sweetheart deal of all sweetheart deals and the city takes it on the chin.

    #1024255

    CB_downtowner
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>CB_downtowner wrote:</div>
    So a city void of any culture, attractions, or sites that bring lots of people to the downtown area.

    Do you think that cities that are void of these things live in a Utopian society where hunger and homelessness are solved?

    I’m in favor of voting on them. I’m also in favor of not bailing out private interests, particularly in a way that the private investor walks away with the sweetheart deal of all sweetheart deals and the city takes it on the chin.

    I was addressing the person who used the blanket “all tax money should go toward feeding the poor” and for that matter, those who claim that all money would be better used on education. There is good reason to invest in things that bring more people to the downtown core, unless people want a city nobody wants to visit, nobody wants to work and live in, which only exacerbates ability to bring money into the city. But I agree that the “how” is more than fair to ask.

    #1046340

    RedStorm
    Participant

    http://wosu.org/2012/news/2014/10/15/city-county-agency-fails-make-nationwide-arena-loan-payments/

    The city and county have not made a single loan payment for the arena

    #1046349

    OneBagTravel
    Participant

    Edit: oops, my joke was for a comment made a year ago. Let me retract that on the statute of limitation joke act of 1982.

    #1046350

    ohbr
    Participant

    I guess it turns out we didn’t need an initiative to end payments in the end If we were never making the payments to begin with….

    #1095294

    News
    Participant

    Convention Facilities Authority Wants Arena Tax Exempt
    By MANDIE TRIMBLE • 27 MINUTES AGO

    As property tax abatements near expiration, the publicly-owned Nationwide Arena faces a big bill. The arena’s owner, the Franklin County Convention Facilities Authority, worries the tax bill will have a huge affect on its operation. The arena wants a permanent property tax exemption.

    READ MORE: http://radio.wosu.org/post/convention-facilities-authority-wants-arena-tax-exempt#stream/0

    #1095302

    NDaEast
    Participant

    Never made any payments, but we are going further and further into public debt. Each missed payment is charged 4.875% interest, payable to Nationwide. I always wondered why the Blue Jackets got the cash for the naming rights — shouldn’t that have been paid to the public owners of the building?, or is it more welfare under a different name (Nationwide moving money from its left pocket to the right).

    the deal stinks for the public, and now they want a permanent tax abatement. They are negotiating with the schools, but what about ADAMH, Senior Services, Children’s Services, MRDD and the library system? Higher taxes on the masses (or reduced services for the vulnerable) so the Blue Jacket’s millionaire and billionaire owners can have their hockey team play for free. It just doesn’t seem right to me.

    #1095307

    jackoh
    Participant

    How about submitting this proposal to a vote of those who would be directly affected by it, the residents of Columbus and Franklin county.

    #1095673

    NDaEast
    Participant

    Jacko … we tried twice with a citizen’s initiative. The first time the board of elections threw it out because we claimed it would save between $3 and 8M per year, and they said “but what if it is voted back in, then it won’t save anything” in rejecting that proposal. The protestor of that was Phil Pikelny, a Dispatch executive and then-chair of the zoo board, so it gave me great pleasure to oppose Issue 6, the zoo levy, and along with 70% of the electorate stick one back to Pikelny and the Dispatch.

    The second time, the city refused to have our petition signatures counted as we had submitted the required certified pre-circulation copy to the city clerk (as their protest the first time around said we should have done because of case law), rather than the city auditor (which we had done the first time because that was written in statute), and even though the city had twice accepted such filings with the clerk and not the auditor, this time city council with Pfeiffer’s blessing refused to send the petition signatures to the Board of Election m for a count and the court agreed with that position as a point of law.Then council got voters to approve Issue 7,which changed our election laws to affirm that you should submit precirculation copies to the clerk (not the auditor — showing it didn’t ever make a difference — in fact, Hugh Dorrian at the first protest testified that all he does is lock the precirculation copies in the vault, sometimes never to be seen again) and doubled the signature count that had been in place for 100 years. They were searching for reasons not to let people vote on this issue (and campaign finance reform, which is what may ironically send Ginther to the pennitentary) — ignoring tens of thousands of valid petition signatures. The next best vote is to get rid of undemocratic Andy Ginther on November 3rd — removing him from public life. He is a disgrace to democracy — apparently believing his role is to rule, not represent.

Viewing 14 posts - 886 through 899 (of 899 total)

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