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Mound Street Connector Project - I-70/71 Split Fix

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Mound Street Connector Project – I-70/71 Split Fix

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 67 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #539728

    dirtgirl
    Participant

    Eliminating the 4th street exit (which you can’t even use if you were previously traveling S/B on 71) will be a welcome change. The merge from 71S onto the 3rd St exit of 670W is perilous and you can’t turn from Broad Street in a lot of places, so getting downtown, at least from the North, is kind of a cluster today.

    #539729

    InnerCore
    Participant

    NerosNeptune said:
    If my memory is correct this project is somewhere around 1B dollars. You could buy a lot more than busses for that much money.

    And this is my problem with this project. Putting politics aside, at the end of the day Columbus is spending $1 billion for this project but can’t get a streetcar line that costs one tenth of this.

    If anyone thinks that freeway traffic is really that bad that $1B on this project is needed over better public transit then I’d assume they’ve never left Ohio.

    This project also makes me think there isn’t any real hope for any type of intercity rail project anytime soon. While other cities are moving forward we are spending large amounts of money moving backwards. After all why would you spend money on rail after you spent a billion on downtown highway connections.

    It’s like having a family of three with 2 cars. Even if it makes sense that the third family member use public transit those chances are going to greatly decrease if you spend your money buying a third car.

    #539730
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    InnerCore said:
    …at the end of the day Columbus is spending $1 billion…

    Ohio (ODOT) is spending $1 billion. Not the City of Columbus.

    #539731
    Caleb
    Caleb
    Participant

    Honestly people tend to be either PRO – transit or PRO – road, which is not very healthy for transportation variation. It should be a big thing to have a balance between all levels of transportation. I don’t like the big number on this project but in order to position Ohio as a more economically feasible place for logistics and growth, we need to continually improve our highways because lets face it, America is a big truck/car country.

    #539732

    InnerCore
    Participant

    Walker said:
    Ohio (ODOT) is spending $1 billion. Not the City of Columbus.

    I get that, that’s why I started that sentence putting politics aside. I guess I should have worded it to say “$1B is being spent on Columbus” rather than Columbus is spending $1B.

    Obviously Columbus is in Ohio and we have a lot of conflict between the state and local level. But that seems to be a common theme here. Columbus is a great city that is been held back and in someways steered in the wrong direction because of the state.

    I guess I should reword my analogy to a family of 3 with 2 cars and a grandparent buys the third member a car.

    #539733

    InnerCore
    Participant

    CalebR said:
    Honestly people tend to be either PRO – transit or PRO – road, which is not very healthy for transportation variation. It should be a big thing to have a balance between all levels of transportation. I don’t like the big number on this project but in order to position Ohio as a more economically feasible place for logistics and growth, we need to continually improve our highways because lets face it, America is a big truck/car country.

    No offense but what your saying makes no sense. You basically say we need a balance of transportation options and then advocate the exact opposite that because this is big truck/car country we should have transportation slanted heavily toward the road.

    I think you visited most major cities you’d be hard pressed to call ALL of America big truck/car country. I know you might have a slightly different view of the America being that Columbus is the LARGEST city without rail.

    In terms of highway systems and commute times Columbus already ranks near the top. So spending I fail to see how spending more money on highways is going to somehow help Columbus to grow.

    #539734

    ehill27
    Participant

    NerosNeptune said:
    If my memory is correct this project is somewhere around 1B dollars.

    I thought the estimate was 1.5 billion.

    #539735

    David
    Member

    TomB said:
    How about renaming this stretch of Mound Street through Downtown. Many of the street names Downtown are, we’ll, a little uninspired.

    You don’t know why it’s called “Mound Street”, do you?

    #539736

    David
    Member

    InnerCore said:

    I think you visited most major cities you’d be hard pressed to call ALL of America big truck/car country.

    With the exception of NY, what cities would those be?

    #539737

    zp945
    Participant

    InnerCore said:
    No offense but what your saying makes no sense. You basically say we need a balance of transportation options and then advocate the exact opposite that because this is big truck/car country we should have transportation slanted heavily toward the road.

    I think you visited most major cities you’d be hard pressed to call ALL of America big truck/car country. I know you might have a slightly different view of the America being that Columbus is the LARGEST city without rail.

    In terms of highway systems and commute times Columbus already ranks near the top. So spending I fail to see how spending more money on highways is going to somehow help Columbus to grow.

    I think what they mean is that a lot of the transport of goods has moved from rail to highway over the last century. Columbus has the advantage of being within striking distance of a huge percentage of the American population and highways are how a lot of that happens. The movement of people has also transitioned away from rail, to highway or air. Maybe Charlotte or Austin or Denver is beating us in the cool categories but unless the very dense population of the Northeast shifts to the very sparse population of the west, I don’t think they will get a leg up on logistics. You have to play to your strengths, and sadly, movement of goods i.e. highways, is one of ours.

    Do I think that means we should continue a path of bad urban development? No. Do I think that means we should throw the baby out with the bathwater? No. The world is not nearly as black and white as many would like to paint it.

    #539738

    TomB
    Participant

    David said:
    You don’t know why it’s called “Mound Street”, do you?

    It is named Mound Street because there was at one time an Indian mound at Mound and High Streets.

    #539739
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Took a few photos this weekend following the beginning of construction on the connector:

    #539740

    Analogue Kid
    Participant

    Wow it’s getting going already.

    #539741

    Mike Hansen
    Participant

    This is this first time for me to look at this project and it looks crazy. Columbus has enough highways, ramps and multi-lane streets slicing and dicing it up, why more. If the rest of this project is any thing like this, I hope it can be stopped.

    #539742

    tonloc620
    Participant

    ODOT is spending $1 Billion on 5 phases of this project. What has been started is phase 1 and 2. The other phases have been delayed for several years because ODOT does not have the funds to finish. The money is being spent for “safety” not for more capacity or for trucks, according to ODOT it’s all about saving lives.

    This is federal and state gas tax money and cannot be spent on transit so it’s not a question of spending it on roads or buses. You pay a two gas taxes when you buy a gallon of gas federal and state and 85% of that money has to be spent on state owned facilities (roads). Ohio (ODOT) is spending all the money they legal have to on public transit.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 67 total)

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