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Most Americans Want a Walkable Neighborhood, Not a Big House

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development Most Americans Want a Walkable Neighborhood, Not a Big House

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Viewing 11 posts - 61 through 71 (of 71 total)
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  • #480952

    Big_Ford_Country84
    Participant

    After 8 years of asking for sidewalks near Indian Mound Rec center we finally got one along Obetz road from High st to Parsons. We still need more done along Parsons and Williams rd. So many people walk down here but usually most of us have to walk in the road and risk being hit. I hope Columbus gets with it updating the city sidewalk plans. Then people can really walk the neighborhood. And it would really be nice if they don’t just focus where the money is, but where the need is. Now to say that the Columbus Southland is a close walkable area would be wrong, but it is getting better. It is nice to have the choice rather than being forced to drive your car to get there.

    #480953

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    david161 said:
    While all the construction of apartments in and around downtown is great, the idea of more people wanting to live in a walkable neighborhood over a big house is a stretch. Just look at the numbers for Columbus. Almost 1.9 million people live in the Columbus metro area. 780,000 live in Columbus. Guessing that at least half of the people that live in Columbus do not live in a walkable neighborhood, that leaves at most 400,000 people in Columbus live in a walkable neighborhood. Add another 100,000 for those that live in walkable areas of the suburbs and you get half a million out of 1.9 million people living in a walkable neighborhood. If you keep the big east coast cities, Chicago, Seattle and San Francisco out of the discussion, most Americans live in rural or suburban areas, not walkable neighborhoods.

    I guess this is the chicken or the egg… Do fewer people live in walkable neighborhoods right now because they don’t want to… or because they haven’t been building them for 50 years? Likely, it’s both. People were more concerned with the American Dream of suburban home ownership first, and of course the car was a status symbol for a long time. So there wasn’t demand and developers didn’t bother. That’s changed, at least in part, and you’ll see a lot more push for this, even in relatively suburban areas (take Dublin’s plan for example). The suburbs (or large homes for that matter) aren’t going away, but they won’t be the exclusive demand that they once were, either.

    #480954

    columbusdreamer
    Participant

    My wife and I just moved in to a house in Iville. We knew all along we wanted to be in an urban environment especially coming from NYC. House isn’t that big but a ton more space than our last NYC apartment but the area was the most important. How close to work? How close to a park? How close to bars and restaurants are we going to be? I think the trend will continue in this direction but the Columbus public schools need to get better. When they do you’ll see a mass influx of people.

    #480955

    News
    Participant

    Why Walkability isn’t Just About Proximity to Shops
    By Walkonomics on 04 February 2013

    For many people, the concept of ‘Walkability’ simply means how many shops, cafes, schools and other services are within walking distance of a particular location. While this is a really important part of a walkable neighbourhood (people won’t walk if there is nothing to walk to) there is a growing body of evidence that suggests that several other factors improve or reduce the walkability of a street or neighbourhood.

    READ MORE: http://thisbigcity.net/why-walkability-isnt-just-about-proximity-to-shops/

    #480956

    mrpoppinzs
    Member

    Most of these seem pretty much common sense, especially that walkability must be met at the human scale.

    One issue that I think rarely gets addressed is crime. You can be in the most walkable area in the world, but if people do not feel safe walking it means very little.

    #480957
    hugh59
    hugh59
    Participant

    Walker said:
    Privacy and walkability aren’t mutually exclusive. Walkable neighborhoods like Victorian Village or Italian Village or German Village can offer plenty of in-home privacy. There’s plenty of privacy fences in all of those neighborhoods.

    So what’s the problem with that blog focusing on one specific finding in the survey?

    And don’t forget Olde Towne East. It has great potential to become a full featured walking neighborhood. While it is an old neighborhood, it’s regrowth could be greatly assisted by some focus of the kind mentioned in the description of the book referred to in Walkonomic’s post above: Why Walkability isn’t just about proximity to shops[/url]

    #480958
    hugh59
    hugh59
    Participant

    columbusmike said:
    I hadn’t had my morning coffee yet…apparently my sarcasm isn’t as evident pre-caffeine. :)

    I can appreciate this. I am one of those people who tends to be very excitable early in the morning. Later in the day I generally regret and disavow comments that I made earlier.

    #480959
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    mrpoppinzs said:
    Most of these seem pretty much common sense, especially that walkability must be met at the human scale.

    One issue that I think rarely gets addressed is crime. You can be in the most walkable area in the world, but if people do not feel safe walking it means very little.

    I think a lot more of that issue is perception than real crime. I know lots of people who are nervous to walk on Parsons Ave. I don’t, however, know anyone who’s actually been a victim of crime on Parsons Ave.

    #480960
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    I think a lot more of that issue is perception than real crime. I know lots of people who are nervous to walk on Parsons Ave. I don’t, however, know anyone who’s actually been a victim of crime on Parsons Ave.

    It happens a lot more than you would think. All over the city, really.

    https://www.crimereports.com/map/index/?search=Columbus+OH

    #480961
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    hugh59 said:
    And don’t forget Olde Towne East. It has great potential to become a full featured walking neighborhood. While it is an old neighborhood, it’s regrowth could be greatly assisted by some focus of the kind mentioned in the description of the book referred to in Walkonomic’s post above: Why Walkability isn’t just about proximity to shops[/url]

    OTE has the potential to nicest neighborhoods in all of Columbus…maybe in another 25 years though.

    #480962

    leftovers
    Member

    There are areas very close by me that I will not walk at night. It does effect walkability but it is hard to put a number on it. Weinland Park had a study done years ago and it was surprising how many locals did not feel safe walking at night.

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