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Most Americans Want a Walkable Neighborhood, Not a Big House

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development Most Americans Want a Walkable Neighborhood, Not a Big House

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Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 71 total)
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  • #480937

    mrpoppinzs
    Member

    That article seems to imply suburban attributes to Worthington that would make it read as fitting into some stereotype of an unwalkable suburb. It is a good deal larger and more diverse than the Short North with varying degrees of walkability and building stock. These types of pseudo-studies seem very generic and overly simplistic.

    I prefer the more traditional infotainment ones that list the 10 best libraries to pick up hot chicks.

    #480938

    JeepGirl
    Participant

    mrpoppinzs said:
    These types of pseudo-studies seem very generic and overly simplistic.

    And maybe a little self-serving when it’s written by someone who’s paid to advocate for sustainable, walkable urban development, and buries that disclosure towards the end of the article.

    #480939
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    Can’t I have both?

    #480940
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Snarf said:
    Can’t I have both?

    In some neighborhoods, yep!

    #480941

    lifeontwowheels
    Participant

    mrpoppinzs said:
    That article seems to imply suburban attributes to Worthington that would make it read as fitting into some stereotype of an unwalkable suburb. It is a good deal larger and more diverse than the Short North with varying degrees of walkability and building stock. These types of pseudo-studies seem very generic and overly simplistic.

    I prefer the more traditional infotainment ones that list the 10 best libraries to pick up hot chicks.

    Pretty clearly labeled as an opinion piece from the start.

    #480942

    mrpoppinzs
    Member

    lifeontwowheels said:
    Pretty clearly labeled as an opinion piece from the start.

    I am not questioning their opinions, but the anecdotal info they use to back them.

    #480943

    News
    Participant

    Live Large in Small Houses
    Posted August 14, 2012

    In my neighborhood, a simple drive down a major street reveals startling changes from block to block. One moment, I’m driving through an area dense with multifamily housing units, the next I’m walking through a peaceful meadow where a sprawling home takes over much of the land.

    READ MORE: http://sustainablecitiescollective.com/ccjao/57836/live-large-small-houses

    #480944

    tdziemia
    Participant

    THe idea that Americans are valuing something other than size of home is pure bullshit in my opinion.

    The average size of new homes being purchased has been on a steady rise for the last 45 years. It dips during each recession, then takes off again.

    http://switchboard.nrdc.org/blogs/kbenfield/us_home_size_preferences_final.html

    In my opinion, the ONLY reason for this to change is because the baby boomers have some sense of their mortality and have stopped buying McMansions.

    Behavior is determined from facts, not from opinion polls.

    #480945

    News
    Participant

    The disturbing and sometimes tragic challenge of walking in America
    Posted January 16, 2013

    In much of America, walking – that most basic and human method of movement, and the one most important to our health – is all but impossible. Maybe not literally impossible, but inconvenient at best, and tragically dangerous way too often.

    READ MORE: http://switchboard.nrdc.org/blogs/kbenfield/the_disturbing_and_sometimes_t.html

    #480946
    Steve
    Steve
    Participant

    News said:
    The disturbing and sometimes tragic challenge of walking in America
    Posted January 16, 2013

    In much of America, walking – that most basic and human method of movement, and the one most important to our health – is all but impossible. Maybe not literally impossible, but inconvenient at best, and tragically dangerous way too often.

    READ MORE: http://switchboard.nrdc.org/blogs/kbenfield/the_disturbing_and_sometimes_t.html

    Some of these stories about pedestrians getting hit and charged with interfering with traffic remind me of the stories I hear about from the Middle East, when a woman is raped and she is charged for being a victim of rape…

    #480947

    gramarye
    Participant

    tdziemia said:
    THe idea that Americans are valuing something other than size of home is pure bullshit in my opinion.

    Homes have been getting larger over time for many decades, true. However, the familiar mantra of the real estate industry is not “size, size, size.”

    #480948
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    Snarf said:
    Can’t I have both?

    Come on over to Grandview. Loose Goose is right down the street and they have a great happy hour beer deal.

    #480949

    InnerCore
    Participant

    tdziemia said:
    THe idea that Americans are valuing something other than size of home is pure bullshit in my opinion.

    The average size of new homes being purchased has been on a steady rise for the last 45 years. It dips during each recession, then takes off again.

    http://switchboard.nrdc.org/blogs/kbenfield/us_home_size_preferences_final.html

    In my opinion, the ONLY reason for this to change is because the baby boomers have some sense of their mortality and have stopped buying McMansions.

    Behavior is determined from facts, not from opinion polls.

    I like it how you took a few facts then used them to create you’re own opinion not really based on facts. The information you provided even shows that the size of houses has been declining. And somehow you argue against this because of the trend line over 45 years??? I think everyone here is talking about what Americans want in this decade not 4 decades ago.

    Furthermore Americans have been in large part moving back to urban areas and increasingly living in rental housing which is usually much smaller. The only housing being built lately is luxury housing which tends to be bigger. So regardless of what the average home size is doing that doesn’t account for where the average American is living, and that’s in smaller housing.

    #480950

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    gramarye said:
    Homes have been getting larger over time for many decades, true. However, the familiar mantra of the real estate industry is not “size, size, size.”

    Haha, indeed true.

    #480951

    david161
    Participant

    While all the construction of apartments in and around downtown is great, the idea of more people wanting to live in a walkable neighborhood over a big house is a stretch. Just look at the numbers for Columbus. Almost 1.9 million people live in the Columbus metro area. 780,000 live in Columbus. Guessing that at least half of the people that live in Columbus do not live in a walkable neighborhood, that leaves at most 400,000 people in Columbus live in a walkable neighborhood. Add another 100,000 for those that live in walkable areas of the suburbs and you get half a million out of 1.9 million people living in a walkable neighborhood. If you keep the big east coast cities, Chicago, Seattle and San Francisco out of the discussion, most Americans live in rural or suburban areas, not walkable neighborhoods.

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