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Most Americans Want a Walkable Neighborhood, Not a Big House

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development Most Americans Want a Walkable Neighborhood, Not a Big House

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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 71 total)
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  • #480922

    dsigner
    Participant

    Simple answer for me, walkable neighborhoods. I prefer to spend more time outside of my house than inside. Long answer would have to consider just what are you guaranteeing is in my walkable neighborhood, just how small a house, etc. But generally, I’d take a German Village or Worthington (close to downtown) over a Lewis Center or Dublin.

    #480923

    bman
    Participant

    cheap said:
    man,get a grip.

    Cheap it was all sarcasm! ; )

    #480924

    dsigner
    Participant

    And by the way, I think privacy is over-rated. If, generally, I know and like my neighbors and we’re polite with other, just how much privacy do I need? I moved into my house on a dense street and haven’t put up first floor blinds/curtains/shutters. So what, someone sees me cooking dinner? That’s just them wasting their time.

    #480925

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    In our neighborhood, some houses still have their overgrown original landscape shrubs against the house and covering windows – great for privacy but good burglar cover as well.

    #480926

    columbusmike
    Participant

    dsigner said:
    And by the way, I think privacy is over-rated. If, generally, I know and like my neighbors and we’re polite with other, just how much privacy do I need? I moved into my house on a dense street and haven’t put up first floor blinds/curtains/shutters. So what, someone sees me cooking dinner? That’s just them wasting their time.

    I have a roommate that recently moved in with me and he grew up in the suburbs (so did I, to an extent, but I’ve been living “more urban” for the last few years). Anyways, my roommate is constantly the pulling blinds shut, while I’m perfectly fine leaving them wide open. Just a few years ago, I used to close all of my blinds too, but I apparently eventually lost that habit after growing more comfortable with people walking past my windows. Interesting how perceptions of security and privacy change over time.

    #480927
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    dsigner said:
    And by the way, I think privacy is over-rated. If, generally, I know and like my neighbors and we’re polite with other, just how much privacy do I need? I moved into my house on a dense street and haven’t put up first floor blinds/curtains/shutters. So what, someone sees me cooking dinner? That’s just them wasting their time.

    Presumes you know and are polite with all your neighbors. Not always possible or desirable.

    Fine for you, perhaps, but for others hell is other people.

    #480928
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    rus said:
    Presumes you know and are polite with all your neighbors. Not always possible or desirable. Fine for you, perhaps, but for others hell is other people.

    If you have shitty neighbors, I don’t really think that adding an extra 10 foot lawn buffer on each side of your house really makes a whole lot of difference.

    #480929
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Walker said:
    If you have shitty neighbors, I don’t really think that adding an extra 10 foot lawn buffer on each side of your house really makes a whole lot of difference.

    Depends. Sometimes, that’s all it takes.

    #480930

    JonMyers
    Participant

    I agree with Andrew the article is pretty bad.

    Just thinking, is there a name for mixed use developments that try and plop down a walkable fake city?

    McCity? McVillage?

    It seems like many of these type of developments, which attempt to emulate cities, and harp on walkability aren’t much different than McMansions.

    Especially when it comes to aesthetic, quality and design, and especially when they’re done by the same old McMansion developers.

    #480931

    James
    Participant

    JonMyers said:
    I agree with Andrew the article is pretty bad.

    Just thinking, is there a name for mixed use developments that try and plop down a walkable fake city?

    McCity? McVillage?

    It seems like many of these type of developments, which attempt to emulate cities, and harp on walkability aren’t much different than McMansions.

    Especially when it comes to aesthetic, quality and design, and especially when they’re done by the same old McMansion developers.

    Isn’t that new urbanism? They may not be McMansions, but when I visited Seaside, FL (Truman show) most of what I saw were either vacation rentals or very expensive houses.

    #480932

    dubdave00
    Participant

    JonMyers said:
    Just thinking, is there a name for mixed use developments that try and plop down a walkable fake city?

    Easton.

    I’m joking… My wife and I stayed at a “live, work, play” new urbanist area like that in Virginia Beach a few miles from the beach. It looked great until we got there. Completely dead. We would have killed for Easton at that point (realizing how spoiled we are in Columbus) and regretted “avoiding the old hotels” in our search for visible humanity. So yea, it sucked.

    That said, I also think the concept of “fake” is somewhat relative. While the odds are slimmer right now, if a “fake” walkable, new urban community does become a success in the long-term, does it matter if the original architecture was meh and the original investors were corporate?

    #480933
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    James said:
    Isn’t that new urbanism?

    For the most part, yes: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_urbanism

    #480934

    Walker said:
    For the most part, yes: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_urbanism

    I think the New New Urbanism is creating an urban environment from … nothing.

    http://www.theatlanticcities.com/design/2012/02/can-one-maines-emptiest-counties-become-urbanist-paradise/1154/%5B/url%5D

    There’s not much in Piscataquis County, Maine – at least not much that’s human (there are plenty of trees and lots of moose). With just 17,535 residents, it’s one of the most sparsely populated counties east of the Mississippi, with fewer than six inhabitants per square mile.

    Which makes it a perfect setting for a densely settled car-free village. At least, that’s what Tracy Gayton thinks.

    A.

    #480935
    MichaelC
    MichaelC
    Participant

    The New York Times highlighted the growth of the value of real estate in walkable neighborhoods by including a paragraph on the Short North.

    In Columbus, Ohio, the highest housing values recorded by Zillow in 1996 were in the suburb of Worthington, where prices were 135 percent higher than in the struggling neighborhood of Short North, adjacent to the city’s center. Today, Short North housing values are 30 percent higher than those of Worthington, and downtown Columbus has the highest housing values in that metropolitan area.

    #480936

    cheap
    Member

    the short north was not struggling in 1996.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 71 total)

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