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Millennials, Gen Y, The Suburbs and The National Housing Crisis

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Millennials, Gen Y, The Suburbs and The National Housing Crisis

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 198 total)
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  • #453340

    gramarye
    Participant

    Joel Kotkin is one of sprawling suburbia’s most outspoken advocates; several of his columns have been posted here before, and on UO. His message doesn’t change much, and that excerpt summarizes it fairly well. I think his ideal metropolis must be Houston, except that Houston might be getting too dense for him now. Phoenix or Las Vegas (or somewhere else currently imploding from overly rapid suburban growth, he wouldn’t care–he’d find some other explanation for the collapse of the suburban housing market), perhaps.

    What I haven’t seen from him yet is a treatment of the extra resources necessary to maintain suburbia vis-a-vis a denser population center of the same population, and where he thinks the resources should come from to pay for those less efficient services in an era of increasingly stressed federal, state, and local budgets. He talks about “smaller, more efficient cities” (with the clear subtext that he’d settle for just “smaller”), but completely ignores just how inefficient suburbs generally are.

    #453341
    Josh Lapp
    Josh Lapp
    Participant

    gramarye said:
    Joel Kotkin is one of sprawling suburbia’s most outspoken advocates; several of his columns have been posted here before, and on UO. His message doesn’t change much, and that excerpt summarizes it fairly well. I think his ideal metropolis must be Houston, except that Houston might be getting too dense for him now. Phoenix or Las Vegas (or somewhere else currently imploding from overly rapid suburban growth, he wouldn’t care–he’d find some other explanation for the collapse of the suburban housing market), perhaps.

    What I haven’t seen from him yet is a treatment of the extra resources necessary to maintain suburbia vis-a-vis a denser population center of the same population, and where he thinks the resources should come from to pay for those less efficient services in an era of increasingly stressed federal, state, and local budgets. He talks about “smaller, more efficient cities” (with the clear subtext that he’d settle for just “smaller”), but completely ignores just how inefficient suburbs generally are.

    +1

    #453342

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    It’s not Millenial-specific, but here’s an old post that shows Columbus’ growth pattern in the last decade:
    http://www.columbusunderground.com/forums/topic/columbus-census-maps-2000-2010-population-change

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    Most of Columbus looks pretty stable (gray), but there are some high growth areas in downtown and the surrounding neighborhoods and some loss in parts of the Hilltop, Linden, near south, and near east. Obviously there’s lots of growth in the surrounding areas. It’s easy to double your population (dark blue) when you start with few people.

    More on the methodology here:
    http://www.datapointed.net/2011/04/maps-us-population-change-2000-2010-census/

    #453343
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    manticore33 said:
    For me, I keep having this feeling that I need to be more connected to nature and my own basic humanity. There is simplicity and beauty of watching life’s nourishment growing before your eyes.

    Agreed, which is why we love having a decent sized backyard here in the city. ;) Gotta lot of work to do on it, but we need a relaxing place we can reconnect with nature, grow vegetables and compost food waste.

    First things first, we have to get rid of the groundhog living under our shed. I’ve also seen a possum in the neighbor’s yard and racoons running around too. It’s almost like we live out in the country. ;)

    #453344
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    rus said:
    http://blogs.forbes.com/joelkotkin/2011/07/20/why-americas-young-and-restless-will-abandon-cities-for-suburbs/

    Uh… that’s a reprint of the same article I posted in the original post. ;)

    #453345
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    rus said:
    That touches on “what is a suburb”. Technically, Grandview is an inner ring suburb but as discussed it’s hardly cul-de-sac country.

    That’s a topic that Joel Kotkin (the author of the article) seems to struggle a lot with:

    http://streetsblog.net/2011/03/04/is-jersey-city-a-suburb-joel-kotkin-thinks-so/

    #453346
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    johnwirtz said:
    It’s not Millenial-specific, but here’s an old post that shows Columbus’ growth pattern in the last decade:
    http://www.columbusunderground.com/forums/topic/columbus-census-maps-2000-2010-population-change

    Most of Columbus looks pretty stable (gray), but there are some high growth areas in downtown and the surrounding neighborhoods and some loss in parts of the Hilltop, Linden, near south, and near east. Obviously there’s lots of growth in the surrounding areas. It’s easy to double your population (dark blue) when you start with few people.

    More on the methodology here:
    http://www.datapointed.net/2011/04/maps-us-population-change-2000-2010-census/

    This is also not Millennial-specific, but related to the topic:

    Urban Columbus sees 45% Gain in YPs

    #453347

    sirlancelot
    Participant

    Many of my neighbors (Discovery District) are college age or millenial. They live here because it is cheap for them and close to classes. The suburbs are for those who can afford it, but now for many people, it’s no longer affordable. Jobs and transportation issues will always be a factor in housing choices but it’s not the only factor.

    There would be less of a housing crisis if all of the vacant structures were rehabbed and affordable to buyers and profitable to owners.

    #453348
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Walker said:
    Uh… that’s a reprint of the same article I posted in the original post. ;)

    Which only goes to show you have excellent taste. ;)

    #453349

    Ameya
    Member

    Personally I would love to live in the city when i graduate, but they are so expensive and with bad or unimpressive public schools. I in no way want to live in the suburbs but it’s going to be hard to avoid them in all likelihood. Especially since I already have a family, I skipped over the young childless professional with lots of expendable income stage, which sucks because I detest driving and I really want to be able to walk places. :(

    #453350
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Ameya said:
    Personally I would love to live in the city when i graduate, but they are so expensive and with bad or unimpressive public schools.

    I’d highly recommend exploring all options before writing it off. There is affordable housing to be found in several areas of our inner city. There are also a lot of very impressive lottery/alternative/charter schools. Or at the very least, affordable housing in the city makes private schools more affordable.

    Worth looking into.

    #453351

    ZHC
    Member

    I guess one of the qualms I have with the meme that Millenials are more desirious urban lifestyles as a new thing is the implication that goes in hand with that, which is that X-ers (and boomers etc) aren’t/weren’t.

    I’m not sure that’s true at all.

    What I think is more likely to be true is that there are a lot of people across all generations who would like to live in walkable settings, but when presented with the perceived economic, transportation, and educational differences at decision time they still mostly choose the suburban style. I.e I think our cities are having trouble delivering urban environments that meet consumer expectations for quality of life on a competitive cost basis.

    I’m also equally sure there are people in every generation who want to live in suburban and rural settings. But in contrast I think they have plenty of great options to do so.

    #453352
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    ZHC said:
    I.e I think our cities are having trouble delivering urban environments that meet consumer expectations for quality of life on a competitive cost basis.

    Think you’re on to something there.

    #453353

    Glaze
    Member

    ZHC said:What I think is more likely to be true is that there are a lot of people across all generations who would like to live in walkable settings, but when presented with the perceived economic, transportation, and educational differences at decision time they still mostly choose the suburban style.

    Firstly, downtown is hardly walkable. I’ve always been fine walking 5+ miles since I hiked in the woods as a kid. But my suburban-cultured peers seem to often lag behind and it just makes the travel time less desirable. If you’re walking 3 mph you can get from Broad and High to the Short North in 20 minutes, walking 4 mph it takes 15. If you’re walking from any of the various flats or apartments in the Scioto Mile and Discovery District, you can double the time.

    Secondly, you are right, not much downtown is cheap. Entertainment is around the corner, but basic needs are a couple miles off. It just feels easier to hop in a car sitting on the driveway you own and get to any destination you want. The living situation boosts your self-perceived affluence and allows someone to feel like they’re doing the ‘correct’ thing. Of course it’s completely normal to live nowhere near the place you work.

    #453354

    lifeontwowheels
    Participant

    Glaze, how would you define “walkable” as it relates to our downtown?

    Parks? Check
    Restaurants/Bars/Nightlife? Check
    Hardware Store? Check
    Grocery Options? Sort of Check. North Market is certainly walkable, though some would argue price and selection.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 198 total)

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