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Retrofitting the Suburbs to be More Sustainable

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development Retrofitting the Suburbs to be More Sustainable

Viewing 14 posts - 76 through 89 (of 89 total)
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  • #942134

    News
    Participant

    4 Designs To Cleverly Reinvent The Suburban Parking Lot

    The sprawling parking lots of the Long Island suburbs cover almost five times as much space as New York City’s Central Park. And that’s just in and around the downtown areas alone. The Long Island Index, a project of the local Rauch Foundation, recently asked architects to design better uses for those acres of asphalt.

    READ MORE: http://www.fastcoexist.com/3026727/4-designs-to-cleverly-reinvent-the-suburban-parking-lot

    #1016227

    News
    Participant

    Skyscrapers in the Subdivision
    STORY BY Amanda Kolson Hurley
    May 12, 2014

    The truth is that the suburbs aren’t going anywhere, and the vast, varied landscape of suburbia can’t be reduced to stereotypes, be they old – Leave It to Beaver, Revolutionary Road – or new. In fact, North America’s suburbs are growing and changing fast. In the U.S., diverse suburban neighborhoods now outnumber diverse city neighborhoods by more than two to one, and diverse suburbs are growing more rapidly than predominantly white ones.

    READ MORE: http://nextcity.org/forefront/view/suburbs-are-not-dead-the-future-of-retrofitted-suburbia

    #1024167

    News
    Participant

    What Transit Will Actually Look Like in the New Suburbia
    LEIGH GALLAGHER
    Jun 12, 2014 36 Comments

    As the Manhattanization of America rolls on — the urbanization of not just our cities but our suburbs — many of these efforts are taking place in the depths of car-dependent suburbia. So while developers tout walkability, sense of community, and access to an “exciting Main Street environment,” a car may still be necessary to commute to work, or for any kind of substantial errand.

    READ MORE: http://www.citylab.com/housing/2014/06/what-transit-will-actually-look-like-in-new-suburbia/372580/

    #1036814

    News
    Participant

    Editorial: Lose cul-de-sacs, other suburban lessons
    Julie Zimmerman, [email protected] 1:35 a.m. EDT August 24, 2014

    From coast to coast, American suburbs share a common look: subdivisions of similar houses along winding streets, and separated from main thoroughfares of office and retail. But in a handful of suburbs across the country, the suburban form is slowly urbanizing. Places like Arlington, Virginia, are using transit stops to spur denser residential and commercial growth. Closer to home, suburbs like Dublin outside of Columbus and Carmel just north of Indianapolis are giving themselves urban facelifts with housing options that go beyond single-family houses with yards, and with mixed-use developments that encourage walkability.

    READ MORE: http://www.cincinnati.com/story/opinion/editorials/2014/08/23/editorial-lose-cul-de-sacs-suburban-lessons/14489411/

    #1041069

    News
    Participant

    Sunday, September 14th, 2014
    The New Donut

    Former Indianapolis Mayor Bill Hudnut used to like to say that “you can’t be a suburb of nowhere.” This is the oft-repeated notion has been a rallying cry for investments to revitalize downtowns in America for three decades or so now.

    READ MORE: http://www.urbanophile.com/2014/09/14/the-new-donut/

    #1041892

    gramarye
    Participant

    It’s a worthwhile lesson …

    … but I lived in Charlottesville, Virginia for three years, and I have to say that it’s possible to do a pretty good imitation of a suburb of nowhere.

    #1052990

    News
    Participant

    Retrofitting Suburbia: It’s All About Context and Scale
    12/02/2014 by Jared Green

    As more sprawled-out suburban and rural communities attempt to turn abandoned, outdated shopping malls into walkable downtown destinations, the chances of things going wrong seem to rise. Developers may fail to understand context and the appropriate scale needed for a new mixed-use development. At the 2014 ASLA Annual Meeting in Denver, Ian Law, ASLA, Place Alliance, explained how even the best laid plans for retrofitting suburbia can go haywire.

    READ MORE: http://dirt.asla.org/2014/12/02/retrofitting-suburbia-its-all-about-context-and-scale/

    #1052993

    pez
    Participant

    Meanwhile, in Dublin, Charles Ruma is proposing to be less sustainable to get approval for development.

    #1059657

    News
    Participant

    DR. STRANGELOVE: OR HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND LOVE SPRAWL (SORT OF)
    by John Sanphillippo 01/17/2015

    I’m a longtime advocate of walkable, mixed-use, mixed-income, transit-served neighborhoods. But lately I’ve been having impure thoughts about suburbia. Let me explain.

    READ MORE: http://www.newgeography.com/content/004828-dr-strangelove-or-how-i-learned-to-stop-worrying-and-love-sprawl-sort

    #1065583

    News
    Participant

    THE EMERGING NEW ASPIRATIONAL SUBURB
    by Aaron M. Renn 02/10/2015

    Urban form in American cities is in a constant state of evolution. Until recent years, American suburbia was often built without an appreciation for future evolution. This has left many older suburbs in a deteriorated state, and has accelerated claims of a more generalized suburban decline.

    READ MORE: http://www.newgeography.com/content/004846-the-emerging-new-aspirational-suburb

    #1086269

    News
    Participant

    Thursday, July 23, 2015 20 Comments
    Is “Sprawl Repair” Worth It?
    by Brad Aaron

    Transforming the territory of strip malls and big boxes into walkable places is a hot topic, exemplified by the popular book “Retrofitting Suburbia.” But is it worth the time, money, and effort?

    READ MORE: http://www.streetsblog.net/2015/07/23/is-sprawl-repair-worth-it/

    #1086274
    Eridony
    Eridony
    Participant

    Yes?

    #1086464

    dubdave00
    Participant

    Part of me wonders if the whole “let the burbs be the burbs and let the city be the city” notion is rooted more in sociological reasons than legit concern for the economics. The author’s “It’s the chicken nuggets of urbanism…” made me think this had more to do with wanting the suburbs to remain an enemy rather than a partner or competitor.

    I do think there are valid times for this argument: If the “new urbanism” being built is simply a facade (In name only) or bare-minimum approach to development (With no city code changes or non-auto transit options). Or if the market can’t sustain it due to different tastes, trends, or demographics. Then yes, it may not be “worth it” economically.

    #1086479

    Cbussmallbiz
    Participant

    I really am chomping at the bit to find out the bits and pieces of the New HUD rules….Impactful or never to be heard again. http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/press/press_releases_media_advisories/2015/HUDNo_15-084

Viewing 14 posts - 76 through 89 (of 89 total)

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