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Make Hudson Beautifully Functional

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development Make Hudson Beautifully Functional

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  • #81336

    pmarie79
    Member

    The plan is beautify and grow the area between on Hudson Street between I-71 and McGuffey Road. This area of Columbus is a hidden gem with a lot of potential for small business growth. However, before it can beautify and grow something needs to be done to decrease the number of convenience stores and prevent anymore from springing up in this small area. What I propose is changing the code prohibiting the placement of convenience stores in close proximity of one another. More small businesses will move into the area knowing that a convenience store will not be placed next door given the current amount of stores currently along the corridor. Also I recommend planting large ornamental trees between the curb and sidewalk to camouflage the various setbacks along the corridor and beautify the area. This project has the opportunity to be the beginning of revitalization for the North Linden area. Check out the Hudson/71 Corridor Plan at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9LSlJv4qxo.

    #363760

    racheltb
    Participant

    I agree that this area has potential for growth. What organization is promoting this change? Or is it just a group of citizens?

    I think convenience stores have a place in a community, especially one where access to transportation is an issue. It’s unfortunate, but many patrons of these stores may not have a way to get to a bigger store and rely on convenience stores for foodstuffs.

    Someone, likely a neighborhood local, owns, runs, and operates convenience stores. Rather than driving out these businesses, why not help them improve their store fronts, inventory, and security?

    #363761

    Analogue Kid
    Participant

    Columbus needs more street trees practically everywhere, not just Hudson. Upper Arlington has a certain aesthetic appeal due in no small part to its well managed urban forest.

    #363762

    Lakee911
    Participant

    Analogue Kid wrote >>
    Columbus needs more street trees practically everywhere, not just Hudson. Upper Arlington has a certain aesthetic appeal due in no small part to its well managed urban forest.

    Much agreed. Go to 311 website and request them. Waitlist is long but you will get one.

    #363763

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    pmarie79 wrote >>
    However, before it can beautify and grow something needs to be done to decrease the number of convenience stores and prevent anymore from springing up in this small area. What I propose is changing the code prohibiting the placement of convenience stores in close proximity of one another. More small businesses will move into the area knowing that a convenience store will not be placed next door given the current amount of stores currently along the corridor.

    I’m not sure this is idea feasible unless convenience stores are licensed in some way. Maybe the city could limit certain types of liquor licenses in close proximity to each other instead?

    Nevertheless, I don’t understand the premise that convenience stores – or the potential for even more convenience stores – is what is preventing other small businesses from moving into the corridor. Could you please explain why small businesses dislike proximity to convenience stores?

    I totally agree about the trees. If the city wants property values to increase, they should be aggressively planting trees everywhere.

    #363764

    LBOWACC
    Member

    racheltb wrote >>
    Someone, likely a neighborhood local, owns, runs, and operates convenience stores. Rather than driving out these businesses, why not help them improve their store fronts, inventory, and security?

    You are kidding me right? I know the owners of at least 5 corner stores in not so nice neighborhoods in Columbus (1 of them is on Hudson) and not a single one of them lives in the neighborhood. that being said with the hours they work, they probably spend more time at their stores than in their homes.

    #363765

    mfreeman
    Participant

    More small businesses will move into the area knowing that a convenience store will not be placed next door given the current amount of stores currently along the corridor.

    I am curious as to what evidence you may have to support this statement. I don’t understand the reasons for such an attitude, if it exists. Do you have any insight into that?

    What I don’t understand is how so many convenient stores can thrive is such a small area.

    #363766

    Columbusite
    Member

    It’s great to see Linden residents getting involved in shaping ideas to take steps in improving the area. The fact of the matter, as far as these kinds of carryouts are concerned, is that yes, they do attract crime. They’re dumpy, blighting structures and a good deal don’t even sell real food. Neighborhoods like German Village aren’t being forced by the city to allow such places, so why should Linden get stuck with them? I know someone who lives in the area (cheap starter home) and problems with the clientele hanging out at these places at night is an issue, as much as some people here would like to pretend that it’s not. If you don’t believe me, feel free to hang out at Sunrise Bar, te only nightspot on Hudson. I mean, what’s the worst that could happen? You’reall forgetting that the video is made by someone who lives in the neighborhood and sees activities going on at these places every time she heads down this street. The good news is that despite the presence of carryouts, it seems to have a higher rate of occupancy than Cleveland Ave.

    E Hudson basically serves as the border of South[/url] and North[/url] Linden and is just an ugly turd in its current state and that’s just the unfortunate reality. Even passing through here just eats away at a piece of your being. It’s packed with unsightly autoshops, which outnumber the amount of unsightly carryouts, ubiquitous crumbling driveways and sidewalks, large swathes of asphalt; it’s a long way from winning a beauty contest is what I’m saying. It could use lots of public art to make it better, especially with the amount of bland cinder block walls n the buildings here. This brings up another issue; the building stock here leaves one with little to work with (unless you want to open a bodyshop), not to mention the fact that it is so car-oriented and feels more like an industrial area than a commercial one. As you can see here at Hudson & Velma there is no traffic signal visible on either horizon. It’s a 1,500 ft walk west or 1,900 east for pedestrians; the only traffic signal between the entire 11 block stretch of 71 and McGuffy is at the Velma Ave intersection. But what kind of businesses do Linden residents want to see here? If it’s to mainly serve as an auto-shop district, which is what it mainly functions as today, there’s little incentive to make it look nice.

    The city’s North Linden plan(check out the 1940’s pic of Cleveland Ave) deals with Hudson on page 37 and they suggest moving all businesses here to Cleveland Avenue, which is suffering from a high vacancy rate, and convert Hudson into a residential-oriented boulevard with greenspace on either side with a median park in the middle. Of course, getting the funding to do so is an obvious issue, but you could talk with the Greater Linden Development Corporation[/url] and city about taking the first step for whichever solution is to be implemented. I think attracting more local businesses is much more likely myself and it’s not setup as a walkable urban business district like Cleveland Ave, so I don’t agree that Hudson is sucking away energy from it.

    #363767

    pmarie79
    Member

    This video was created for a OSU City & Regional Planning class. I wanted to post it on ColumbusUnderground to get some feedback on the idea. I grew up in the area and I am always sad to see that area has not improved since I lived in the area. Convenience stores for me are a large part of the problem, not to say that auto shops are not. At least once or twice a year you will see a story on the news of one being robbed or someone getting shot outside of one of the stores on Hudson. Not to mention the number of issues that occur that do not make the news. The patrons of these stores have access to other grocery options via the COTA bus or a car so in most cases this is not their only access to food. So what purpose do they serve? I don’t think that all of the stores should be eliminated, but so many of them in close proximity is not required. Anytime you see “NOW OPEN” sprayed painted on the side of a store tells me that the owners may not share the same respect for the neighborhood as those that reside there.

    #363768

    dirtgirl
    Participant

    Hudson Ave (and eventually Mock) is my secret “back way” to get to the Easton area from my South Clintonville home. It’s an interesting drive to say the least. Speaking of a conversion to residential, there is a huge housing development under construction at the corner of Parkwood that went up nearly overnight last fall (final exterior work is underway now). Right across the street from that is a vacant lot with two semi trailers parked in it. According to Google Street View, it looks like the area under construction was already residential to begin with. The sign suggests the housing will be exclusively for seniors.

    #363769

    Columbusite
    Member

    @ pmarie79 – Carryouts are also an issue in Weinland Park and likewise act as magnets for criminal activity and bring down property values. This is where I argue that your freedom to open whatever kind of business you want is limited when you are negatively, and unnecessarily, affecting residents’ home values for your personal gain. A design standard for convenience stores/carryouts should be implemented at the city level at the very least rather than expect each and every neighborhood fight this battle. And it needs to be enforced with severe fees when ignored and then closed if not in compliance after so many infractions. No cheap plastic signage should be allowed, certain lighting should be a no-no, and we have some nice carryouts as examples where they have none of the problems the dingy ones do. Check out the one on the east side of High between 4th and 5th and the C-town Market down on State and 4th Downtown. Beautifying auto-shops could be done: maybe look into having murals painted on the sides of several? Also, some sort of design standard that is achieved for E Hudson here would probably be best applied to all businesses here in the present and future. For a great example of a business with a beautified asphalt parking lot surrounded by a fence check out Captain Cream Cheese/Late Night Slice off of 3rd and High which consists of a former used car lot and is now adorned with ferns, flowers, planters and other improvements to make a typically ugly area quite welcoming.

    The city’s plan to help move businesses to Cleveland Ave was drafted in 2003, well before the economic conditions we see here today. I’m leaning toward your plan, since it’s easier and more economically feasible to improve the existing corridor vs. moving all businesses. Checking out what other neighborhoods have accomplished and speaking with neighborhood leaders, who are usually part of a neighborhood association, is another great way to learn how to implement such plans. I know that Parsons Ave on May 15th is having a cleanup and beautification effort to improve the corridor. It might be a good idea to come out and speak with organizers. E Hudson is much smaller than Parsons too, so it’s a lot less ground to cover.

    @ dirtgirl – That’s a strange, ugly and poorly-planned area; that stretch of Hudson east of Linden is the border between North Central on the south and Northeast Columbus on the north.

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