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Like your library? It might be gone by July 1st

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Politics Like your library? It might be gone by July 1st

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 219 total)
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  • #281549

    catnfiddle
    Participant

    Ugh, I’m so glad I don’t have to make the decision of what to cut. The sad fact is that SOMETHING will have to go that is vital.

    #281550

    joev
    Participant

    I don’t want anything to think that I’m against the libraries in any way. Libraries have helped make me the person I am, and have provided thousands of hours of learning, entertainment and development. It’s just that the budget situation is so bad that few programs are going to go uncut. And programs that deal with the more basic needs like food, safety, shelter and primary education are rightly going to be prioritized. After $2 billion in cuts during the last biennium, I don’t think there are many programs left to point at as an “easy” cut, and few that deserve special protection.

    I’m worried by the stripping away of the services we’ve come to rely on and expect, but I think the state should be focusing on these basic needs, as demands for them will be increasing.

    I say this as a person whose livelihood depends on two General Revenue Fund line items that will likely be zeroed out.

    #281551

    gramarye
    Participant

    Yeah, that’s the real issue: it’s one thing to say “don’t cut the libraries,” and in principle, I’m extremely sympathetic to this, as I’ve got library cards at three public libraries. The problem is that so much has been cut already that all the low-hanging fruit are long since gone. There are no easy cuts left to make. If not this, then what? (And if not that, then what? And if not that, then what? Lather, rinse, repeat …)

    Library funding would be one of the first things I’d peg to restore when the economy recovers, but I’m not about to go against Strickland’s judgment regarding how much each individual program has to be cut. None of this can be easy for him.

    #281552
    Mae Greentree
    Mae Greentree
    Participant

    I do not want to see our library funding cut any more, and I have written to the Governor’s office to say so.

    One huge problem I have with the Ohio government is that they are not making enough cuts where they are most likely to save the most money: their own operations. For example, why are we paying to maintain an Ohio Department of Taxation office in Santa Ana, California?

    #281553

    CMH Gourmand
    Participant

    Ohio used to considered the “heaven” of libraries – we had great state funding and often good local funding. Funding for libraries has been continuously cut since 2003. In spite of that the Columbus Metropolitan Library has been frequently ranked the best in the country for its size many times.

    Cuts are going to happen – and the libraries are going to loose funding. I would like to see cuts to libraries reduced so – I do hope that cuts are leveled at agencies that serve fewer people and funding is reduced for departments that are still overfunded with high upper management salaries.

    Libraries do serve everyone by offering significant service and help to all citizens of Ohio – use of libraries typically goes up as the economy goes down.

    So I hope the target on libraries can be made smaller since they offer a superior service.

    Do keep in mind that your local libraries do receive local funding as well – so vote for library levies and see what you can do to help your favorite library – donations, etc.

    The dollar per movie idea would raise some revenue but it also would cost additional funds for staff – handling cash, record keeping, etc. It would also slow service – you can’t do self service if you have to pay as well. (Although some type of prepaid card or prepaying your librarty card for $1 movies could work).

    However – every little bit helps so pay off your unpaid library fines and support friends of the library book sales when they occur

    #281554
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    Oh, we have to stay on this issue. We have to remember this is happening, and advocate for our libraries.

    A library is a place where someone can freely obtain tools that can never be taken away from them. Things which are truly theirs, to use to the best of their abilities, forever.

    They are also oases of calm and community, and for many people, their only respite from very difficult lives.

    I can understand the complexity of the issue and the necessity for deep cuts to state programs, but let’s definitely keep libraries at the top of our list of most valuable uses of state money.

    I will follow everyone’s suggestions about how I can help.

    Can we do anything else?

    #281555

    gramarye
    Participant

    CMH Gourmand wrote >>
    Do keep in mind that your local libraries do receive local funding as well – so vote for library levies and see what you can do to help your favorite library – donations, etc.

    I don’t even know if my local libraries here have the authority to request their own levies. I know I haven’t seen any in the two years I’ve lived here.

    The dollar per movie idea would raise some revenue but it also would cost additional funds for staff – handling cash, record keeping, etc. It would also slow service – you can’t do self service if you have to pay as well. (Although some type of prepaid card or prepaying your librarty card for $1 movies could work).
    However – every little bit helps so pay off your unpaid library fines and support friends of the library book sales when they occur

    I’d be happy to pay to rent materials, even books, if the rates were reasonable and billing were convenient. For example, if I could just put a one-time charge of $50.00 on my credit card or PayPal account and keep drawing that down until it was gone, then make another credit to my account, so that the checkout process would remain the same, I’d plunk down in a heartbeat. (In fact, charging to rent new releases that are in high demand might actually temper some of the waiting lists as well as raising funds. Some people would find it worth waiting until the new release wasn’t so new anymore, when the price would presumably come down.)

    #281556
    Jeff Regensburger
    Jeff Regensburger
    Participant

    Since the idea of charging for services has come up a couple times, I feel I should mention that one of the central tenets of public library service in America is the idea of equal access to information (That’s why it says “Open to All” above the doors on the Main Library downtown). Rental fees and other charges for materials can have the effect of creating an economic barrier to access. Once you begin charging for services, you’re no longer open to all, but rather open to the people who can afford it.

    #281557

    misskitty
    Participant

    jeff_r wrote >>
    Since the idea of charging for services has come up a couple times, I feel I should mention that one of the central tenets of public library service in America is the idea of equal access to information (That’s why it says “Open to All” above the doors on the Main Library downtown). Rental fees and other charges for materials can have the effect of creating an economic barrier to access. Once you begin charging for services, you’re no longer open to all, but rather open to the people who can afford it.

    Maybe in that case it could be run like the school lunch programs are and for certain people it would be reduced or free.

    #281558

    joev
    Participant

    jeff_r wrote >>
    Since the idea of charging for services has come up a couple times, I feel I should mention that one of the central tenets of public library service in America is the idea of equal access to information (That’s why it says “Open to All” above the doors on the Main Library downtown). Rental fees and other charges for materials can have the effect of creating an economic barrier to access. Once you begin charging for services, you’re no longer open to all, but rather open to the people who can afford it.

    Principles like that are great, but would you rather see libraries shut down or charge for non-essential services? I fail to see how charging a small fee for movies would create an economic barrier. If you can’t afford to watch a movie that costs $.50 or $1 from the library, you should probably be doing something more productive with your time. I can see charging for movies but keeping books free. That seems a reasonable thing to do in tough times.

    God, I sound like a Republican.

    #281559

    misskitty
    Participant

    If books were excluded from the list there would still be , Movies, Cd’s, Prints,Downloads,and They offer classes So maybe a buck per class or so ?

    #281560

    Nitsud Regnifloh
    Participant

    joev wrote >>

    jeff_r wrote >>
    Since the idea of charging for services has come up a couple times, I feel I should mention that one of the central tenets of public library service in America is the idea of equal access to information (That’s why it says “Open to All” above the doors on the Main Library downtown). Rental fees and other charges for materials can have the effect of creating an economic barrier to access. Once you begin charging for services, you’re no longer open to all, but rather open to the people who can afford it.

    Principles like that are great, but would you rather see libraries shut down or charge for non-essential services? I fail to see how charging a small fee for movies would create an economic barrier. If you can’t afford to watch a movie that costs $.50 or $1 from the library, you should probably be doing something more productive with your time. I can see charging for movies but keeping books free. That seems a reasonable thing to do in tough times.
    God, I sound like a Republican.

    i couldnt agree more – we already have places where people can rent movies, it’s called VIDEO STORES. libraries spend too much $$ buying DVDs and CDs…

    #281561
    Jeff Regensburger
    Jeff Regensburger
    Participant

    This is certainly a worthy debate, the problem is the State’s budget is going to be hammered out in the next 8 days!!!

    The best thing library supporters can do right now is call this guy (and your state legislators) and let him know you object to the proposed cuts to the Ohio Public Library Fund.

    Operators are standing by! (614) 466-3555

    #281562

    Personally, I think if the library is going to be in the video rental business they should be doing it for a charge…but really, I don’t think they should be in it anyway, truth be told.

    #281563

    joev
    Participant

    I also suggest everyone look at the whole picture of proposed cuts. Also on the table is elimination of subsidized pre-school for low income kids, elimintation of vision and dental benefits from Medicaid, elimination of a program that helps the elderly receive in-home care rather than entering nursing homes. I can live with reduced funding for libraries if it means saving any of these programs, although I’ll hate it.

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