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Light Rail in Central Ohio

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Light Rail in Central Ohio

Viewing 15 posts - 556 through 570 (of 634 total)
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  • #1093997

    Zyro: Yes, Columbus has some very congested areas of the hair-pulling nature especially during rush hours. Some other cities are congested virtually everywhere all day long. We’re not there, yet. It’s all relative. Spend a week driving in LA, DC, or Chicago and you’ll likely feel better about a Columbus commute. Many times, I’ve spent an hour or two to go a very few miles in LA — not during rush hour and not due to any accidents. Saturday Night Live does a spoof called “The Californians” where the characters discuss the routes they take to get places in almost every discussion on almost every topic. That’s not really far off reality.

    #1094086

    JMan
    Participant

    Whether we’re not there yet with congestion, we should be planning for the eventual. Light Rail, the High Street Tunnel, or other forward thinking public transportation concepts. Come on Columbus!

    #1094116

    JMan: We should have twenty or more years ago but the forward-thinking political leadership has not been and is not there for a variety of reasons. If by “High Street Tunnel” you mean a subway,that’s extremely unlikely.

    #1095166

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    COTA has an online survey available now, along with ideas/proposals for enhanced bus service and new rail/brt corridors. Fill it out and let them know what should be prioritized!

    Survey and more information here: http://www.cota.com/nextgen

    Detailed map of possible rail or brt corridors: http://www.cota.com/COTA/media/PDF/NextGen/NG_Potential-HCT-Corridors-min.pdf

    Just for fun, my top 5 were:

    1) N High St
    2) Downtown-CMH-Easton
    3) East Main
    4) West Broad
    5) Newark Connection

    #1095996

    News
    Participant

    COTA Looking for Help in Picking Best Corridors for Light Rail or Streetcars
    October 5, 2015 8:00 am – Brent Warren

    There is no shortage of opinions in Columbus about whether rail should be a part of our future transit network, and the Central Ohio Transit Authority, with it’s ongoing NextGen process, is very methodically working toward an official recommendation on that front. However, before any decisions are made about what type of “premium transit” is best for Columbus — light rail, streetcar, bus rapid transit, or something else — COTA wants to be sure that there is agreement about where it should go.

    READ MORE: http://www.columbusunderground.com/light-rail-or-streetcars-in-columbus-bw1

    #1096214
    Stephen43215
    Stephen43215
    Participant

    This is definitely a step in the right directions but are they planning for 5 years out or 20 years out? a Streetcar loop from German Village (Whittier Street) to the south to OSU campus (Lane Ave) to the north would be a very good start. I google mapped this route and it’s actually shorter than I thought being around 9.5 miles round trip in the loop I have highlighted in green.

    #1096215

    S.browning
    Participant

    This must be a joke . Stop talking about this , it’s never going to happen in Cbus . As for your Euro friends ask them how much they pay for gas !!! They tax the hell out of till it’s about 6.00 a liter . That’s how they pay for there transportation systems This is the same city the bitches about Nationwide area / and by the way EVERY major city has one of those . Being paid for . So if Cota wants it let them build it and pay for it . If they decide to build it how about just making it light rail and use exciting tracks . Rent the damn thing and see if anybody rides it and if they do then move forward . Can’t we try something like that instead of soaking about a billion dollars it to something .

    #1096231

    DavidF
    Participant

    I am very excited about using light rail on exciting tracks! Where may I find such tracks?

    #1096414

    ehill27
    Participant

    That dude sounds angry.

    #1096487

    dcariens
    Participant

    I cannot figure out why the Columbus business community won’t push for rail transit. I am sitting in a hotel looking at the building boom around the new Metro stop at Tysons Corners Virginia. Everywhere light rail and heavy rail is build it results in a real estate bonanza–jobs, profits, new businesses. Buses do not do that. And has anyone really taken a look at the Health Line in Cleveland? What a waste of money. The city should have build a light rail line. I was there a week ago and was not impressed. Again, buses just don’t cut it when it comes to attracting riders and stimulating growth.

    #1096517

    InnerCore
    Participant

    I cannot figure out why the Columbus business community won’t push for rail transit. I am sitting in a hotel looking at the building boom around the new Metro stop at Tysons Corners Virginia. Everywhere light rail and heavy rail is build it results in a real estate bonanza–jobs, profits, new businesses. Buses do not do that. And has anyone really taken a look at the Health Line in Cleveland? What a waste of money. The city should have build a light rail line. I was there a week ago and was not impressed. Again, buses just don’t cut it when it comes to attracting riders and stimulating growth.

    Having lived in DC I completely agree. From a real estate development prospective to fixed nature of light rail it what you need when you are looking to build/own transit oriented developments. Once the investment is spent to put light rail at a certain location you can be assured that location will not only have access to the network well into the future, but you have a higher probability that new developments are going to happen along that line.

    Light rail also helps expand the value of locations to other locations. So for example right now High st is essentially the hear of Columbus. But the value of High st can only extend so far as people are only willing to walk so far. So if Columbus really wants development and growth to spread out more then they should be looking to run light rail not on High st but from/to High st. So if I had to choose just one line to build I would choose something like Broad st. since it goes straight through downtown west to east and intersects High st. I’d start from say maybe 70 to the west and go all the way to Franklin Park to the east. It could then easily be extended to run from 270 to 270 and an extension from Broad to the airport along Stezler.

    That would essentially extend the value of downtown/SN out to the the first inner ring suburbs. Broad st. is already a thoroughfare. Developers could build higher density projects with retail along the ground floor and which decreases in density as you flow into the neighborhoods. KLD, OTE, Franklinton, etc. would become much more walkable and connected overnight.

    I think its the difference between city planning an looking to the future and simply managing day to day. High st. future is determined and set. It has enough traffic that people are going to feel comfortable hoping on the circulator and business/developers feel confident that its going to be a destination into the future. If you’re going to spend x amount of dollars you might as well do it in a way that revitalizes well suited locations on the margin where you’re going to get more back.

    Put it this way given the current zoning the SN corridor is pretty much close to capacity. Most people already don’t want more dense buildings/traffic etc. And the more density that is coming is coming regardless of transit as this is essentially the primary location. However increasing the density along Broad st. in a way that allows the residents to get to/from high st without a car only adds to the synergy of both locations.

    #1096537

    Eugene_C
    Participant

    I cannot figure out why the Columbus business community won’t push for rail transit. I am sitting in a hotel looking at the building boom around the new Metro stop at Tysons Corners Virginia. Everywhere light rail and heavy rail is build it results in a real estate bonanza–jobs, profits, new businesses. Buses do not do that. And has anyone really taken a look at the Health Line in Cleveland? What a waste of money. The city should have build a light rail line. I was there a week ago and was not impressed. Again, buses just don’t cut it when it comes to attracting riders and stimulating growth.

    Is that the one on Euclid? I believe that was designed to be converted to rail once they could get enough support and funding. They wanted to get the basic infrastructure in place so that the next stage would be easier, since they failed to get a street car the first time around.

    #1096539

    Pablo
    Participant

    I cannot figure out why the Columbus business community won’t push for rail transit. I am sitting in a hotel looking at the building boom around the new Metro stop at Tysons Corners Virginia. Everywhere light rail and heavy rail is build it results in a real estate bonanza–jobs, profits, new businesses. Buses do not do that. And has anyone really taken a look at the Health Line in Cleveland? What a waste of money. The city should have build a light rail line. I was there a week ago and was not impressed. Again, buses just don’t cut it when it comes to attracting riders and stimulating growth.

    So true. In this photo of Toronto, you can tell where the Yonge St. subway is by the clusters of towers stretching to the horizon.

    http://i.imgur.com/5Q9ns.jpg

    #1096570

    WJT
    Participant

    I think (besides High) a line from downtown to CMH to Easton would be good. If it cannot be built along the railway right of ways, then down Broad and up Steltzer would work. It would help rejuvenate East Broad and help kickstart the redevelopment they want near the airport, and there are still some open spaces along Stelzer for high density development(as well as at Easton). Also it looks like Stelzer could be widened without too much difficulty. Have a transit center at the airport, and you would have a connection between the main retail center, the main transportation center(the airport and the transit center) and the core of the city and major job center.

    Also it would help redevelopment east of downtown to ‘gasp’! ‘gentrify’ the near east side along Broad( a natural area for it since it would connect a gentrifying downtown with an already stable and gentrified Bexley. You already have some good architecture/desirable well built homes to deal with(unlike anything westside, which was built for working class families and has always pretty much been working class and may not be as amenable to ‘fixing up’ rather than ‘bulldozing’.

    #1096583

    InnerCore
    Participant

    I think (besides High) a line from downtown to CMH to Easton would be good. If it cannot be built along the railway right of ways, then down Broad and up Steltzer would work. It would help rejuvenate East Broad and help kickstart the redevelopment they want near the airport, and there are still some open spaces along Stelzer for high density development(as well as at Easton). Also it looks like Stelzer could be widened without too much difficulty. Have a transit center at the airport, and you would have a connection between the main retail center, the main transportation center(the airport and the transit center) and the core of the city and major job center.

    I’m not a fan of the existing rail route. At first though it seems like an obvious choice but in terms of functionality I think it would be bad. If your goal was to get people from the airport into downtown without any stops then I think it works. But I just don’t think were to the point where that should be the focus. A route down Stezler to Broad would take longer but would connect to so much more of the city.

    And as you mentioned a connection to Easton would be great. Imagine a train location at Easton with a lot of mixed used residential on Stezler rd. First it’s what Easton really needs to move forward past just primarily shopping. With more residents it could develop into a true town center. You have plenty of jobs nearby and then when you want you could take a train into downtown. It would be a great affordable option for young professionals.

Viewing 15 posts - 556 through 570 (of 634 total)

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