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Light Rail in Central Ohio

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Light Rail in Central Ohio

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 634 total)
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  • #505416

    geoyui
    Participant

    Walker said:
    I’d argue that a better system would be one that goes from a high density area to another high density, servicing riders traveling in both directions for multiple reasons (and not just a rush hour commute). Something like a route from Clintonville to German Village might be better suited in terms of functionality.

    stephentszuter said:
    Rome only has two lines, we could have one to begin with. :)

    This reminds me of the subway system in Glasgow, Scotland. Believe it or not, Glasgow’s underground system is the 3rd oldest in the world, but it’s only a single loop. 1 train goes clockwise, the other counterclockwise. Glasgow had built extension tunnels to extend out to the suburbs for future growth, but they discovered there was no need. The single loop was sufficient for the people. It has about a dozen stops and serves the dense areas of the city. When I was riding it, I instantly thought this is something Cbus residents could support.

    #505417
    Steve
    Steve
    Participant

    geoyui said:
    This reminds me of the subway system in Glasgow, Scotland. Believe it or not, Glasgow’s underground system is the 3rd oldest in the world, but it’s only a single loop. 1 train goes clockwise, the other counterclockwise. Glasgow had built extension tunnels to extend out to the suburbs for future growth, but they discovered there was no need. The single loop was sufficient for the people. It has about a dozen stops and serves the dense areas of the city. When I was riding it, I instantly thought this is something Cbus residents could support.

    That wouldn’t be bad, but it would also need something for everyone inside the circle (kind of like 270 needs 670/71/70 et cetera)…

    This reminds me of Moscow’s metro. A big circle with lots of lines going throughout it. I still think that’s one of the big missing elements with Chicago’s system. They need a half circle.

    #505418
    MichaelC
    MichaelC
    Participant

    Rather than a subway, which despite perhaps being ideal would be tremendously expensive at this point, an alternative such as this is an interesting concept that might make more sense in an already-dense High Street corridor:

    youtube=http://youtu.be/2cShtEadkEc/

    #505419
    Steve
    Steve
    Participant

    MichaelC said:
    Rather than a subway, which despite perhaps being ideal would be tremendously expensive at this point, an alternative such as this is an interesting concept that might make more sense in an already-dense High Street corridor:

    youtube=http://youtu.be/2cShtEadkEc/

    Everyone keeps talkin’ crazy-like.

    #505420
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    stephentszuter said:
    So I guess in short, it’s much more complicated than, “Let’s get some light rail!”

    ‘Zactly. ;)

    stephentszuter said:
    I know my next statement may sound a bit outlandish, but dare we build a metro line underneath High from German Village to Clintonville?

    Too costly IMHO.

    Would be more feasible to build on street (retiming lights for rail priority) or existing rail lines (reroute those chemical filled freight lines around the city) or in other right of way areas (someone recently mentioned highway medians).

    joshlapp said:
    Touche. I just think that everything that could have possibly been said on the topic already has. What we need now is action. There are certain groups in the city that are beginning to move in that direction. What the movement needs is support from some of our larger corporate citizens as well as grassroots support from citizens.

    I agree with you that this discussion feels redundant to anyone who’s had it before, but keep in mind that with a population as transient as the one in Columbus, there were likely people who didn’t take part in the conversation two years ago, or five years ago, let alone back in 2001 when the COTA Fast Trax Light Rail North Corridor was actually still a proposal. 11 years is a long time ago.

    joshlapp said:
    Light rail will most likely not be built without a ballot issue/new tax. COTA also needs to renew its temporary tax that expires in 2016. I’m sure I don’t need to explain why a new light rail ballot issue is probably the least of COTA’s worries right now.

    I agree, especially if we’re talking about a $1B light rail line.

    Something smaller light a Streetcar on the other hand could probably find alternative sources of funding. Help from the private sector, federal funding, city bond packages, etc. There will be no help from ODOT or the Governor in the short term.

    geoyui said:
    This reminds me of the subway system in Glasgow, Scotland. Believe it or not, Glasgow’s underground system is the 3rd oldest in the world, but it’s only a single loop. 1 train goes clockwise, the other counterclockwise. Glasgow had built extension tunnels to extend out to the suburbs for future growth, but they discovered there was no need. The single loop was sufficient for the people. It has about a dozen stops and serves the dense areas of the city. When I was riding it, I instantly thought this is something Cbus residents could support.

    Where would you like to see a loop like that run here? I don’t think the outerbelt would work. And the innerbelt is too close together. Something in between?

    #505421
    Steve
    Steve
    Participant

    Okay, well this has been an enlightening discussion. Sad Steve will continue to be sad, but with hope. In the meantime, I will stock up on exact change and try to bus it as much as possible.

    :/

    #505422

    geoyui
    Participant

    Walker said:
    Where would you like to see a loop like that run here? I don’t think the outerbelt would work. And the innerbelt is too close together. Something in between?

    I would agree not the outerbelt or innerbelt. And more like an amoeba shaped loop. Some of the stops I had in mind would be crew stadium, clintonville, OSU (could be multiple locations), short north, casino, hilltop, franklinton, german village, Columbus Commons/bicentennial park, CCAD/CSCC, OTE/Franklin Park Conservatory, CMH, Linden. However as I’m looking at a map, these stops may be better served with 2 lines forming a cross and creating a central station somewhere downtown.

    #505423

    CMHflyer
    Participant

    I’d argue that a better system would be one that goes from a high density area to another high density, servicing riders traveling in both directions for multiple reasons (and not just a rush hour commute).

    I would tend to agree. I think connecting our hub nodes in Central Ohio via light rail would work incredibly well. My personal thought would be an Easton-airport-downtown-OSU link.

    The light rail would start at the COTA Easton Transit Center at Morse and Steltzer. From there it would travel at street level along Steltzer to CMH. From there, the train could take a variety of paths to downtown:

    1. It could run above I-670, similar to JFK’s AirTrain over I-685.

    2. It could continue down Steltzer and run on existing freight tracks at E. 5th Ave, paralleling 670 into downtown.

    3. It could continue on street-grade on Steltzer all the way to the intersection of James Rd. and Broad St., and continue at street grade into downtown.

    Option #1 would likely be the fastest, but also the most costly. Option #3 would likely be the cheapest, but also the slowest. Option #2 would probably fit the bill best, but disputes over the rail lines with the freight train companies could be problematic.

    Upon reaching downtown, the train would continue to the OSU campus area, either along High St. or northbound on 4th St and southbound along Summit to 11th Ave at the most southerly point or Hudson St. at the most northerly. During morning and evening rush hours, trains could run express Easton-airport-downtown and back, which would actually make it faster than driving I-670 at 7:30am and 5pm.

    If such a plan were to be proposed, it would have to be presented correctly. As mentioned previously, Central Ohioans are vehementy opposed to anything that could even hypothetically increase taxes on them.

    To pay for this plan, I would offer a combination of public/private funding, maximizing the private funding of course. During the streetcar proposal, OSU offered several thousand dollars in start-up capital. I have no doubt that they would earmark money to this proposal as well. Contributions could also come from the Columbus Regional Airport Authority, The Georgetown Company-Easton, and downtown constituents such as CDDC, GCCC, and NRI. The primary source of funding, in my opinion, would be to a tarrif on car rentals. Many might remember that a tax on car rentals was put on the ballot in Columbus several years ago and, for reasons I don’t understand, was defeated. However, given how standards have changed in the years since the original proposal, I think such a concept could work now. Of course, it would have to be marketed correctly. The word “tax” simply cannot be used, as too many people in this area dumb down tax = bad, and would overturn it solely on semantics.

    Another major point I heard brought up a lot during the streetcar proposal was that it would serve only small part of the local population, and therefore was not worth supporting.

    An Easton-airport-downtown-OSU line would have to convince people that it would serve not only a large amount of the Columbus population base in each node it served, but could easily be expanded to other major nodes such as Dublin, Polaris, and Westerville. In addition, it would serve a market few in Columbus consider: out of town visitors. When I worked at CMH, I remember having to respond with embarrassment upon being asked by international passengers where they could find the train into the city. In addition, the majority of my business travelers were staying either in Easton or downtown. Providing a link from the airport to both of these nodes would be extremely beneficial to marketing Columbus as a place to do business.

    So yeah, that’s my plan for rail transit in Columbus. I know it’ll never happen, but it’s nice to dream sometimes.

    #505424

    Twixlen
    Participant

    I think it should include the airport. It would be so awesome to have transit to & from the airport.

    #505425
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    stephentszuter said:
    In the meantime, I will stock up on exact change and try to bus it as much as possible.

    That’s a good strategy, and one that should be encouraged. Higher ridership numbers for existing transit services will increase the likelihood for the development of additional services. ;)

    geoyui said:
    I would agree not the outerbelt or innerbelt. And more like an amoeba shaped loop. Some of the stops I had in mind would be crew stadium, clintonville, OSU (could be multiple locations), short north, casino, hilltop, franklinton, german village, Columbus Commons/bicentennial park, CCAD/CSCC, OTE/Franklin Park Conservatory, CMH, Linden. However as I’m looking at a map, these stops may be better served with 2 lines forming a cross and creating a central station somewhere downtown.

    Heh. My next question is that if a big loop is constructed to hit all of those points, what do you propose tearing down to build it? ;) Would probably rip through the middle of a lot of neighborhoods to be installed. Which is not entirely unheard of….

    #505426

    cheap
    Member

    you folks are forgetting there is now a world class casino/buffet in this town.

    more motivation to construct an airport rail line to the west perimeter.

    or not.

    #505427

    geoyui
    Participant

    Walker said:
    Heh. My next question is that if a big loop is constructed to hit all of those points, what do you propose tearing down to build it? ;) Would probably rip through the middle of a lot of neighborhoods to be installed. Which is not entirely unheard of….

    Yeah, ripping through neighborhoods is probably not ideal. That’s probably another reason why a cross shape would be best as that could run along some major roads/highways. This could lead to a central COTA/rail hub in the middle of the city.

    #505428

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    stephentszuter said:
    That brings up a good point–we had the streetcar in line for voters, but it was shot down. Wasn’t it because of the funding channels? I think they wanted the businesses on High Street to fund the streetcar instead of the general public, correct?

    Can anyone shed some light on what happened there? I wonder if we can get this back on Mayor Coleman’s agenda…

    I see this falsehood being promoted all over the internet. Columbus has never voted on a streetcar. The last time the city was given the chance to vote on rail was in 1999, and it wasn’t even listed on the ballot as a rail initiative, but simply a funding increase for COTA. So technically, Columbus has never been given the chance to vote on the issue. And people are right, if Cincinnati can push it through, so can Columbus. And they probably would have a couple years ago had it not been for the recession and Kasich.

    #505429

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    cheap said:
    not enough people use mass transit here.

    not enough people in this town want it here.

    Coleman is the Dispatch’s bitch,and the Dispatch doesn’t want it here.

    btw,young professionals do still move here.did you notice all the development downtown?

    those aren’t retirement villages being built,those are young professional internment camps.

    Polls showing people don’t want it?

    #505430

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    bjones7 said:
    I am not saying this subject can not be revisited by the city.( It seems to be revisited on CU every other conversation!) However the people have spoken and we have no rail! Majority rules! so does economics and politics (BIG REASON!)

    Mr Akron him self, playing the worlds smallest violin on this subject!

    Again, Columbus has not voted on this issue. Where are you guys getting this majority stuff?

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 634 total)

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