Our City Online

Messageboard - Transportation

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

Light Rail in Central Ohio

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Light Rail in Central Ohio

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 634 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #505401
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    ricospaz said:
    +1

    But I wish they would have something from the airport to downtown. run it down the middle of 670 or something.

    Be nice, sure. Considering how soundly the streetcar was thrashed, though, I don’t see it happening.

    #505402
    Steve
    Steve
    Participant

    We used to have street cars, when our population was much smaller… it’s doable now.

    Are we coming to a consensus that it’s the populous’ opinions on the matter that is causing it not to happen?

    I still think that’s a misconception.

    #505403
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    stephentszuter said:

    I still think that’s a misconception.

    Then prove it. Asking your friends doesn’t count; sample size too small.

    For reference:

    http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2008/05/05/story10.html?page=all

    #505404
    Steve
    Steve
    Participant

    rus said:
    Then prove it. Asking your friends doesn’t count; sample size too small.

    For reference:

    http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2008/05/05/story10.html?page=all

    The article says that the downtown business owners oppose the streetcar, but

    They said development of a broader light rail system is a better option than a streetcar line.

    So in a sense, they wanted more than just a streetcar. I can support that…

    #505405

    Twixlen
    Participant

    It seems the article I just posted in the bus stigma thread also applies here, in some sense…

    Why We Should Stop Talking About ‘Bus Stigma’[/url]

    North American public transit has a lot of work to do, especially when it comes to buses, but telling transit agencies that they must defeat a “stigma,” or break into a new “class,” amounts to telling them to despair. It implies they must uproot supposedly deep-seated feelings in people’s hearts, the sort of feelings that may change en masse only with the turning of generations. More disturbingly, it tells everyone that an incurious aversion toward buses is a normal part of being a successful person.

    Fortunately, the real path to successful transit is easier. Now and then a major advance, like a new rapid transit line, causes a step-change in transit’s relevance, but most of the time transit improves gradually as funding permits. Usually, when transit makes a modest improvement, it gets a modest ridership gain as a result, because the change has shifted the calculus for a few people on the vast spectrum of income and situation. If everyone were stuck at the extremes of “choice” and “captive,” or waiting for transit to become relevant to their “class,” this outcome would be impossible. In fact, it’s routine.

    Mass transit, even the indispensable bus, will continue on that path to greater relevance to the degree that citizens care about it and demand that it be funded. Right now, many people who don’t use transit are making a rational choice, based on its current usefulness and their alternatives; no stigma is needed to explain that behavior. As transit improves, and especially as other options become more expensive, decisions will continue to change, person by person, family by family, and ridership will grow as a result. At some point in that process, journalists will stop talking about a stigma. But the solution to the “stigma” or “class” problem, all along, was to refuse to define it that way.

    #505406

    Pablo
    Participant

    Rail is too slow – we need the Hyperloop!

    San Francisco to L.A. in 30 minutes![/url]

    #505407

    bjones7
    Participant

    geoyui said:
    I think bjones gif was not to offend you but the topic in general. If you searched on this site “light rail” you’d find a good number of forum topics related (and unrelated) to light rail.

    I for one would definitely support and ride it. I tend to think the notion that a city doesn’t have enough riders or wouldn’t support it can be false. It’s hard to understand something until it is there for you to see and appreciate. A live and die by my car here in Columbus, but anytime I’m in a city with mass transit, I use it and I use it a lot. If it’s there and it’s convenient and cheap, I think the populace will eventually come around and appreciate the benefits.

    Agreed! I too support mass transit. In fact I lived in SF for 2 years, which is more of a bus city then light rail. Anyways what all of this boils down to in Columbus/Ohio is politics! In which they do not point in favor of Light Rail. In fact I believe many on CU would agree with me that between current events with trains/politics in D.C and our own statewide failure of the 3C two years ago, TRAIN transit does not look bright in Columbus’s future. Fingers crossed,maybe there will be some talk by 2020.

    PLUS we have our own transit issues with COTA…

    #505408
    Steve
    Steve
    Participant

    bjones7 said:
    Agreed! I too support mass transit. In fact I lived in SF for 2 years, which is more of a bus city then light rail. Anyways what all of this boils down to in Columbus/Ohio is politics! In which they do not point in favor of Light Rail. In fact I believe many on CU would agree with me that between current events with trains/politics in D.S and our own statewide failure of the 3C two years ago, TRAIN transit does not look bright in Columbus’s future. Fingers crossed,maybe there will be some talk by 2020.

    PLUS we have our own transit issues with COTA…

    Okay. Well, at least we’re talking about it.

    With downtown’s continuing population densification(?) hopefully we will put the discussion back on the agenda soon.

    :/

    #505409

    bjones7
    Participant

    Pablo said:
    Rail is too slow – we need the Hyperloop!

    San Francisco to L.A. in 30 minutes![/url]

    I was thinking of that the other day! That more people in Columbus would be on board if they could get from point A to point B FASTER than their car on I-71 or I-70.

    #505410
    Josh Lapp
    Josh Lapp
    Participant

    I am a huge proponent and I find it not even worthwhile discussing anymore especially on the internet. Like so many other issues anymore people refuse to listen to facts. It also doesn’t help that some would rather set a pile of money on fire than spend it on any form of public transportation.

    #505411

    Cookie
    Member

    I was hoping this was about light rain in Central Ohio, which I think we can all agree would be nice.

    #505412
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    stephentszuter said:
    We are losing out on the demographic that every city desires (young, educated professionals) because of the fact that we have no real mass transit system. Sure COTA isn’t bad and it’s getting better, but where’s the light rail? Where’s the metro?

    We’ve actually made significant gains in that demographic from 2000-2010:

    Urban Columbus sees 45% Gain in YPs

    Though we’re not growing as rapidly as other cities, and one factor is certainly a lack of a more robust transit network (light rail, streetcar, BRT, bikes, etc).

    stephentszuter said:
    Don’t tell me that Central Ohio isn’t dense enough, because it is (at least enough to start small). It can take 20+ years to build light rail, so we need to get started now.

    I agree that a master plan should be developed now. With over 500,000 new residents expected in Central Ohio in the next 20 years, our road systems are only going to become more congested unless some better options are planned from the outset.

    MORPC Drafts Long-Term Metropolitan Transportation Plan

    I think part of the problem is that in the past, light rail lines were proposed as a suburban commuter route, which means it travels from a low density area on the suburban end to a high density area like Downtown on the other end. That type of line serves only one use (rush hour) and one audience (suburban residents who work Downtown). It also further enables suburban sprawl and justifies the building of park and ride stations that are nothing but a place to board and a surface parking lot. In a sense, it further allows for the same type of land use that the highway system has allowed for in the past 50 years.

    I’d argue that a better system would be one that goes from a high density area to another high density, servicing riders traveling in both directions for multiple reasons (and not just a rush hour commute). Something like a route from Clintonville to German Village might be better suited in terms of functionality.

    To some degree, I think this is a challenge for light rail development in Columbus, which is made up of one large city and a bunch of much much much smaller suburban communities.

    We don’t need light rail just for the sake of light rail. We need better urban planning for various communities and areas to build up and a master plan for rail infrastructure that solves real people-moving issues in the long term.

    #505413
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    joshlapp said:
    I am a huge proponent and I find it not even worthwhile discussing anymore especially on the internet.

    Then you’re not a huge proponent. ;)

    #505414
    Steve
    Steve
    Participant

    Walker said:
    We’ve actually made significant gains in that demographic from 2000-2010:

    Urban Columbus sees 45% Gain in YPs

    Though we’re not growing as rapidly as other cities, and one factor is certainly a lack of a more robust transit network (light rail, streetcar, BRT, bikes, etc).

    I agree that a master plan should be developed now. With over 500,000 new residents expected in Central Ohio in the next 20 years, our road systems are only going to become more congested unless some better options are planned from the outset.

    MORPC Drafts Long-Term Metropolitan Transportation Plan

    I think part of the problem is that in the past, light rail lines were proposed as a suburban commuter route, which means it travels from a low density area on the suburban end to a high density area like Downtown on the other end. That type of line serves only one use (rush hour) and one audience (suburban residents who work Downtown). It also further enables suburban sprawl and justifies the building of park and ride stations that are nothing but a place to board and a surface parking lot. In a sense, it further allows for the same type of land use that the highway system has allowed for in the past 50 years.

    I’d argue that a better system would be one that goes from a high density area to another high density, servicing riders traveling in both directions for multiple reasons (and not just a rush hour commute). Something like a route from Clintonville to German Village might be better suited in terms of functionality.

    To some degree, I think this is a challenge for light rail development in Columbus, which is made up of one large city and a bunch of much much much smaller suburban communities.

    We don’t need light rail just for the sake of light rail. We need better urban planning for various communities and areas to build up and a master plan for rail infrastructure that solves real people-moving issues in the long term.

    So I guess in short, it’s much more complicated than, “Let’s get some light rail!”

    With the idea that we need to go from dense area to dense area, that would most likely be north and south on High Street. Makes sense to me!

    I live downtown, just a fifteen minute walk to High Street (or a quick bus ride), and besides work, which is out in the middle of nowhere, it would help me get to and from Clintonville, where my sister lives, and the Short North, where I get schwasted. Or even to another bus route which could get me to my parents.

    I know my next statement may sound a bit outlandish, but dare we build a metro line underneath High from German Village to Clintonville?

    Rome only has two lines, we could have one to begin with. :)

    #505415
    Josh Lapp
    Josh Lapp
    Participant

    Walker said:
    Then you’re not a huge proponent. ;)

    Touche. I just think that everything that could have possibly been said on the topic already has. What we need now is action. There are certain groups in the city that are beginning to move in that direction. What the movement needs is support from some of our larger corporate citizens as well as grassroots support from citizens.

    Light rail will most likely not be built without a ballot issue/new tax. COTA also needs to renew its temporary tax that expires in 2016. I’m sure I don’t need to explain why a new light rail ballot issue is probably the least of COTA’s worries right now.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 634 total)

The forum ‘Transportation’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Subscribe below: