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Plastic Bag Bans in Columbus

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Plastic Bag Bans in Columbus

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 145 total)
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  • #1044668
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    Does anyone have any evidence that the used plastic bags that being collected at grocery stores are ever recycled ?

    Yep. According to the EPA its about 14%, which is up dramatically over the last 5 years or so. The bags are 100% recyclable, btw, and consume about 75% less fossil fuel and create less greenhouse gas than paper bags in their creation. In addition, depending on where you look, estimates are between 75% and 90% of plastic carry-out bags are re-used in households. About half of those are used in place of another plastic bag (pet waste, trash can liners, etc.).

    #1047523
    #1047658

    6a
    Participant

    I think the easiest way to solve this is to force retailers to charge customers something like 25 – 50 cents a bag for plastic bags.

    And I pinky swear to pay for each and every bag I grab when I roll through the self checkout at the 3C & Eakin Kroger some random Friday night with a cold beverage. Like a junkie, I just gotta go to the seedy side and get my fix of bags to HAUL AWAY MY CAT’S SHIT.

    Also, the “If you don’t like plastic bags then don’t use them, cool. Forcing your views on others is obnoxious, un-cool. Be cool.” argument doesn’t hold up. Under that logic we’d still have leaded gasoline, cars without seat belts, and DDT.

    Let’s see here…leaded gas was pretty much standard until it wasn’t, same with seat belts, and ok, I’ll give you DDT. But let’s stop being ridiculous; plastic bags have always been a choice rather than an only option. I have been to places (Toronto comes to mind) with a 5 cent plastic bag fee. I’d pay that to keep it for the cleaning of my cat shittery. 50 cents is black market territory.

    #1047729

    substance
    Participant

    Let’s see here…leaded gas was pretty much standard until it wasn’t, same with seat belts, and ok, I’ll give you DDT. But let’s stop being ridiculous; plastic bags have always been a choice rather than an only option. I have been to places (Toronto comes to mind) with a 5 cent plastic bag fee. I’d pay that to keep it for the cleaning of my cat shittery. 50 cents is black market territory.

    Lead in gas is a direct cause of reduced mental development in children. It was no longer the standard because people fought to have it removed from gasoline and household paint, so that we did not inadvertently poison or children.

    I do agree that 50 cents a bag is too much. A nickel or dime sounds fine.
    When I forget to bring my two cloth bags to Kroger and don’t pay attention to the bagger, I can come home with 10-15 bags. It is madness

    #1047783

    6a
    Participant

    Lead in gas is a direct cause of reduced mental development in children. It was no longer the standard because people fought to have it removed from gasoline and household paint, so that we did not inadvertently poison or children.

    Yes, I understand why it was banned. The point was being made, using leaded gas as an example, that the “if you don’t like it, don’t use it” argument is fallacy. I said that didn’t make sense because leaded gas was the default in cars at the time.

    #1047788

    substance
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>substance wrote:</div>
    Lead in gas is a direct cause of reduced mental development in children. It was no longer the standard because people fought to have it removed from gasoline and household paint, so that we did not inadvertently poison or children.

    Yes, I understand why it was banned. The point was being made, using leaded gas as an example, that the “if you don’t like it, don’t use it” argument is fallacy. I said that didn’t make sense because leaded gas was the default in cars at the time.

    Thanks. I guess I need to read closer

    #1047795

    goldenidea
    Participant

    From the Dispatch article:

    Another problem is that Rumpke, which operates curbside recycling for the city, does not accept plastic bags.

    If plastic bags are 100% recyclable, does anyone know why Rumpke doesn’t accept them in the City recycling program?

    #1047796

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    From the Dispatch article:

    Another problem is that Rumpke, which operates curbside recycling for the city, does not accept plastic bags.

    If plastic bags are 100% recyclable, does anyone know why Rumpke doesn’t accept them in the City recycling program?

    I believe they can get caught in, and clog up the machines that Rumpke uses. Many curbside recycling programs in other cities also don’t accept them for this reason.

    #1047797

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    I just fill a bag with them and drop it next time I go back to the store.

    #1047799
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    I just fill a bag with them and drop it next time I go back to the store.

    Well I think you should have to pay at least $5-10 for that privilege, because of my own personal feelings.

    #1047800

    david161
    Participant

    Recently there has been talk that Columbus City Council is considering a ban on the use of plastic grocery bags. While this may sound like a good idea, it really does nothing to help the environment. It only shifts the problem elsewhere. In the case of banning plastic bags, it may reduce litter a bit, but using other types of bags increases the amount of raw materials and energy needed to produce them, and increases the amount of energy and pollution caused by transporting them. It also creates other health and environment issues.

    Having worked in the recycling industry in the past (Today I do not work for a recycler or a store that uses any kind of bags to transport products, etc.), I have studied many ways to recycle and help the environment. I therefore have a better understanding that most people, and understand the whole effect that recycling has, not just the ‘feel good’ part of recycling and saving the environment. Making changes quite often has other negative effects that no one considered.

    Plastic bags take very little raw material and energy to produce. Due to their light-weight, transporting them uses less energy and produces less pollution. Paper bags and reusable bags use more raw materials and energy to produce and transport, and create more pollution in both of these steps. Studies show that you have to reuse a paper bag at least 4 times and cloth bags well over 100 times for the environmental advantages to begin. I believe these numbers may be low. Also, it takes more energy and creates more pollution to recycle paper and cloth grocery bags than it does to recycle plastic bags.

    Have you considered the health issues that come from using reusable grocery bags? They must be properly washed on a regular basis. If not mold and germs will grow in these bags, which is not healthy. Then there is the use of water, detergent and energy to clean the bags. What is the environmental impact of this? Also, were you aware that you must have designated cloth bags to transport only fresh meat, and others for fresh fruits and vegetables? There is a real problem with cross contamination, if you don’t.

    What about the people that use plastic grocery bags to clean up dog and cat messes, line small trashcans and use them to carry stuff. They will now have to buy new plastic bags to handle these uses of plastic bags. In these cases not only are you losing the reusability of the plastic grocery bags, you are creating a need for more one time use plastic bags. More energy needed and pollution created to produce and transport these one-time use only bags.

    I am asking City Council to not pass a ban plastic bags, and instead look into an education campaign that show residents how to reuse and recycling plastic bags. Also, stores could look into ways to reduce the number of plastic bags they use, such as not using bags for one or two items and not putting items with handles, such as milk jugs and laundry detergent, in bags. In the long run this would be better for the environment and residents.

    #1047832

    pez
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>substance wrote:</div>
    Lead in gas is a direct cause of reduced mental development in children. It was no longer the standard because people fought to have it removed from gasoline and household paint, so that we did not inadvertently poison or children.

    Yes, I understand why it was banned. The point was being made, using leaded gas as an example, that the “if you don’t like it, don’t use it” argument is fallacy. I said that didn’t make sense because leaded gas was the default in cars at the time.

    Lead in fuel was phased out due to it not being compatible with catalytic converters. Didn’t really have aything to do with children’s mental states, the final ban was more of a way to allow the oil industry to kill of a product that had become uneconomical to support.

    #1048619

    News
    Participant

    City of Columbus Begins Research on Plastic Bag Restrictions
    October 31, 2014 8:13 am – Jesse Bethea

    Following recent bans and restrictions on single-use plastic bags in several states and municipalities across the country, the office of Mayor Michael Coleman is resolved to formulate a similar policy for Columbus. How exactly to protect the city from being polluted by plastic grocery bags is a task which has fallen in part on David Celebrezze, Columbus’ GreenSpot Coordinator.

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/city-of-columbus-begins-research-on-plastic-bag-restrictions-jb1

    #1048628

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    Below Greenlawn

    edited to add, a water/solar-powered trash skimmer in Baltimore

    http://www.nbcnews.com/news/video/solar-powered-water-wheel-cleaning-baltimores-inner-harbor-n237031

    #1048641

    byJody
    Participant

    Alex, Thank you for sharing this water wheel, it gives me great hope!

    Below Greenlawn

    edited to add, a water/solar-powered trash skimmer in Baltimore

    http://www.nbcnews.com/news/video/solar-powered-water-wheel-cleaning-baltimores-inner-harbor-n237031

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 145 total)

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