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Plastic Bag Bans in Columbus

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Plastic Bag Bans in Columbus

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 145 total)
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  • #65740

    timothyb
    Member

    City leaders in San Francisco approved a ban on plastic grocery bags after weeks of lobbying on both sides from environmentalists and a supermarket trade group. San Francisco would be the first U.S. city to adopt such a rule if Mayor Gavin Newsom signs the ban as expected.
    The law, approved 10-1, requires large markets and drug stores to offer customers bags made of paper that can be recycled, plastic that breaks down easily enough to be made into compost, or reusable cloth.
    San Francisco supervisors and supporters said that by banning the petroleum-based sacks, blamed for littering streets and choking marine life, the measure would go a long way toward helping the city earn its green stripes.
    “Hopefully, other cities and states will follow suit,” said Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi, who crafted the ban after trying to get a 15-cent per bag tax passed in 2005.
    The 50 grocery stores that would be most affected by the law argued that the ban was not reasonable because plastic bags made of corn byproducts are a relatively new, expensive and untested product. Some said they might offer only paper bags at checkout.
    “I think what grocers will do now that this has passed is, they will review all their options and decide what they think works best for them economically,” said David Heylen, a spokesman for the California Grocers Association.
    Newsom supported the measure. The switch is scheduled to take effect in six months for grocery stores and in one year for pharmacies.
    Craig Noble, a spokesman for the Natural Resources Defense Council, said it would be disappointing if grocers rejected the biodegradable plastic bag option, since more trees would have to be cut down if paper bag use increases.
    The new breed of bags “offers consumers a way out of a false choice, a way out of the paper or plastic dilemma,” Noble said.
    How many of you folks bring your own bag to the grocery store?

    #122912
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    timothyb wrote How many of you folks bring your own bag to the grocery store?

    Anne & I do sometimes. Other times we use plastic and recycle them.

    I think this law is a bit excessive. I don’t see plastic bags causing anymore litter around here than anything else (cans, bottles, drive through trash, etc).

    #122913
    Anne Evans
    Anne Evans
    Keymaster

    petroleum-based sacks

    I thought this was why plastic bags are hated. Not because of a litter problem.

    #122914
    Anne Evans
    Anne Evans
    Keymaster

    Craig Noble wrote it would be disappointing if grocers rejected the biodegradable plastic bag option, since more trees would have to be cut down if paper bag use increases.

    Recycled paper bags are not an option?

    #122915

    ddavis
    Member

    What’s stopping the stores from providing NO bags at all?

    :roll:

    #122916
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    Well, the one thing I can promise is this:

    I will NOT, under any circumstances, be picking up dog poop in either a canvas or paper bag.

    #122917
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Coremodels wrote I will NOT, under any circumstances, be picking up dog poop in either a canvas or paper bag.

    How are you supposed to set it on fire on someone porch then? :lol:

    #122918

    lifeliberty
    Participant

    i use all my plastic bags I get from the grocery store

    #122919

    lifeliberty
    Participant

    btw, I think Aldi either does not provide bags, or they charge you for them to keep their costs down. same with their shopping carts, it makes you put in a quarter to get the cart, then when you return it it returns your quarter, they get to hire less people this way.

    #122920
    vestanpance
    vestanpance
    Participant

    Walker wrote

    How are you supposed to set it on fire on someone porch then? :lol:

    Don’t tell me what to do devil woman!

    #122921

    Schoolboy
    Participant

    not many trees left either

    #122922
    Bonnie Dodds
    Bonnie Dodds
    Participant

    ddavis wrote What’s stopping the stores from providing NO bags at all?

    :roll: Aldi does make you buy bags or go hunt for cardboard boxes…they use minimal shelving & keep things stacked in the boxes. Nobody seems to have a problem w/it… maybe it wouldn’t be as awful as we think. *shrug*

    It is true what Anne said though that plastic bags aren’t the only thing that people litter. I dunno why they’re making a big stink about plastic bags.

    Heres an idea…. NO MORE PACKAGING AT ALL. Everything will be in bins & drums. We’ll bring our own tupperware to the store… well, wait, tupperware is made of plastic… so, we’ll bring glass baking dishes to the store to put everything in…

    #122923

    timothyb
    Member

    I think part of idea is to stop for a second when you go to any store and they put your purchase into three or four plastic bags. We are so used to the idea that resources both natural and man-made are infinite that we sometimes have to stop for a minute and remember that no, resources are not infinite and never ending. Less plastic is a good thing. I always bring my TJ paper bags back to Trader Joe’s and I bring my plastic bags back to Target…

    Plus at TJ’s if you bring your paper bags back, they get your name and phone number and enter you into a drawing for a basket of free TJ’s food stuffs..

    I went to the Canton IKEA this past weekend and they no longer give away plastic bags. They sell them for a nickel a piece and the money goes to the American Forests, the nation’s oldest non-profit citizens conservation organization, to plant trees to restore forests and offset CO2 emissions.

    Also, to help alter customer behavior and endorse environmentally responsible habits, IKEA will be selling its iconic reusable ‘Big Blue Bag’ for 59 cents, a cost that has been reduced from 99 cents.

    The blue bag, while also made of plastic, is durable, strong and roomy. Because one sturdy reusable bag will replace hundreds of single-use bags, IKEA hopes customers will bring it along to carry purchases when they shop at IKEA stores and elsewhere.

    It happens everyday. We make a few purchases and pop them into a plastic bag. Or a few bags. Actually, it’s quite staggering when you think about it. The amount of plastic bags we use and toss is overwhelming. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. consumes over 380 billion plastic bags, sacks and wraps each year. Each year, Americans throw away some 100 billion polyethylene plastic bags, and less than one percent of them are recycled. Single-use bags made of high-density polyethylene are the main culprit. Once brought into existence to tote purchases, they will accumulate and persist on our planet for up to a thousand years.

    #122924

    Walker wrote I think this law is a bit excessive. I don’t see plastic bags causing anymore litter around here than anything else (cans, bottles, drive through trash, etc).

    Isn’t it a step in the right direction, though? Just because we can’t immediately regulate all waste at once doesn’t mean we ought not take what steps we can. The article gave a 10-1 pass on this; I wonder what the dissenter had to say about it.

    #122925

    shy_999
    Participant

    Walker wrote I don’t see plastic bags causing anymore litter around here than anything else (cans, bottles, drive through trash, etc).

    I go to the creekside in Gahanna with my father and son all the time. Since the last big rain, that made Big Walnut rise, I have been over there twice. There are plastic bags stuck in trees and brush all around the banks where the water had risen. Yes, there are pop cans and bottles all over the place too. The bags are more noticable because they aren’t lying on the ground half covered with sand, dirt and shells.

    I’ve noticed more plastic bags around watery areas. (Ex: Hoover Dam, Alum Creek, Woodside Green – park in Gahanna with a pond) On the side of the road I see fast food trash and pop cans/bottles more. I’m not sure how getting rid of plasic bags will cut down on litter, but I wouldn’t have a problem using recyclable material… I live in a recycling community so it’s really easy for me and I already do it.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 145 total)

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