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The Dennison (Formerly The Leafy Dale) in Victorian Village

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development The Dennison (Formerly The Leafy Dale) in Victorian Village

This topic contains 94 replies, has 36 voices, and was last updated by  Nancy H 3 years, 3 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 95 total)
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  • #187741

    cbus11
    Member

    I just want to echo the general opinion that this building is probably located in one of the best locations in the central city. It is a relatively quiet safe residential area, but close to just about everything. I had some friends who lived close by on Dennison and they hardly ever drove anywhere. Their only complaint was all their friends wanted to use their house for a rest stop during comfest.

    At 650k the Woods got a steal on this place.

    #187742

    goldenidea
    Participant

    I lived in this building for years and got by very easily without a car. My roommate, however, did have a car, and had no problems parking. It’s funny to talk about this building adding parking stress to the neighborhood because it has been there forever (probably since cars weren’t really an issue?), only closed like a few years ago and is now coming back online. See what I mean?

    I’ve lived close to this building for 20+ years. It’s located in one of the best areas of one of the best urban neighborhoods in the city. The building has been vacant for five years. A lot has happened over the course of that time in the area (e.g. quite a few condo conversions, a few new or reoccupied carrage houses, etc.). These events have contributed to the trend of an increasing number of cars in the neighborhood. This trend has been ongoing for decades because of gentrication. So today, there are significantly more cars parked overnight in the area than even 5 years ago.

    It’s great to see the building finally reopen, but it would be nice to see some kind of parking arrangment made for at least some of these new residents. If it were a new-build or a converted use development, a parking variance would be required. Given that the building has been vacant for so long, it’s impact on the area is equivalant to it being a new build or conversion.

    I suggest that there are a very limited number of post-undergrad, career people living in Columbus that don’t own cars. We haven’t come to the point where there are enough benefits or incentives to NOT owning a car. The demographics of the building will be different than when it was last occupied. It’s part of a generally positive trend, but an event that’s going to pose challenges.

    #187743
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Sounds like we’re talking about a chicken and egg situation though. Do we make parking more difficult, therefore giving people less incentive to own one in an urban neighborhood like this? Or do we force developers to accomodate parking and make it as cheap and easy as possible for everyone, therefore enabling everyone to continue to own cars?

    The cities where there is a large number of people not driving are the ones where parking is hard and expensive. If we don’t want to head in that direction as a city, then we’ll always be a city of drivers without adequately supported public transit.

    #187744

    goldenidea
    Participant

    At 650k the Woods got a steal on this place.

    Agreed! I considered chasing it when it was coming to auction, but in addition to other concerns (it’s still a major project), I knew I couldn’t face my neighbors were I to buy it, knowing all the new cars that will need to be crammed into the area.

    My thought is, if you work the numbers, at $650K maybe they can afford some kind of parking solution, if there is one. Hubbard School might be possible, at least for late hours, the time when on-street parking is hardest to come by but the school lot is empty.

    #187745
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Walker said:
    Sounds like we’re talking about a chicken and egg situation though. Do we make parking more difficult, therefore giving people less incentive to own one in an urban neighborhood like this? Or do we force developers to accomodate parking and make it as cheap and easy as possible for everyone, therefore enabling everyone to continue to own cars?

    Is the idea that if people aren’t given a choice about parking they’ll have to buy in anyway ( based on location, cost, or whatever )?

    Sort of a “don’t build it and they’ll still come”?

    #187746
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    rus said:
    Is the idea that if people aren’t given a choice about parking they’ll have to buy in anyway ( based on location, cost, or whatever )? Sort of a “don’t build it and they’ll still come”?

    I’m just saying that it doesn’t work both ways. If you accomodate free/easy parking then the chance of improved public transit is lessened.

    #187747
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Walker said:
    I’m just saying that it doesn’t work both ways. If you accomodate free/easy parking then the chance of improved public transit is lessened.

    With a dominate culture that drives, how do you attract buyers without adequate parking? I’m just saying that looks to be a huge detriment.

    #187748
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    rus said:
    With a dominate culture that drives, how do you attract buyers without adequate parking? I’m just saying that looks to be a huge detriment.

    You don’t have to attract the entire dominant culture. Just 21 renters. It’s a niche market, but it exists.

    #187749
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Walker said:
    You don’t have to attract the entire dominant culture. Just 21 renters. It’s a niche market, but it exists.

    Possibly. I’m skeptical that you’d find enough people who desire to be completely carless… but hey, if people want to buy it then someone will sell it.

    #187750

    leftovers
    Member

    At the rents they will probably be paying they will probably expect some kind of available parking.

    As Columbus is very sprawling and COTA limited I think some form of car sharing (like the now defunct OSU zipcar) would be good. It would probably need to be incentivized / subsidized at first to be effective.

    I think a lot more people would be willing to give up car ownership if they knew they had some kind of backup (and might end up using it a lot less then they thought). Maybe weening off of the car may help reduce the chicken/egg scenario.

    #187751

    lifeontwowheels
    Participant

    leftovers said:
    At the rents they will probably be paying they will probably expect some kind of available parking.

    As Columbus is very sprawling and COTA limited I think some form of car sharing (like the now defunct OSU zipcar) would be good. It would probably need to be incentivized / subsidized at first to be effective.

    I think a lot more people would be willing to give up car ownership if they knew they had some kind of backup (and might end up using it a lot less then they thought). Maybe weening off of the car may help reduce the chicken/egg scenario.

    Hertz took over at OSU and runs a car share service on campus open to anyone. Would be great to see it expand beyond campus.

    #187752
    Josh Lapp
    Josh Lapp
    Participant

    Getaround is an awesome concept. I would love if they expanded to Central Ohio or a local company of a similar concept sprouted. If only I had enough hours in the day.

    http://www.getaround.com/

    #187753

    osu789
    Member

    I lived in the Leafydale about 5 years ago. It was a fantastic place to live. The building was beautiful, if even falling apart a bit. I’m not sure if I believe in ghosts but the leafydale would def. have been a prime candidate for a haunting. The electricity went out every now and then, but the leafydale was mostly full of OSU students who just didn’t care. I always regretted that I could not have lived in the leafydale over the last few years. I miss the murphy beds that dropped down out of a built in wall closet. The murphy beds were inscribed on the metal that they were manufactured in 1909 and they were seriously heavy iron. I paid $400 in rent a month. There wasn’t a deal quite like the leafydale in Columbus!

    #187754

    Mr Man
    Member

    Any word on prospective rents?

    #187755

    ehill27
    Participant

    On Thursday, they’re seeking approval to construct a “new extension to the existing Leafy Dale” by replacing the adjacent 2-story, 10-unit apartment building with a 5-story that adds 2 levels of parking.

    VVC March 2012 Agenda (page 3, item 7).

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 95 total)

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