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Kids in Restaurants

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Dining Kids in Restaurants

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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 132 total)
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  • #385656

    lisathewaitress
    Participant

    CheeseFoodie wrote >>
    +1 lew! I hated those children’s menus as a kid, I didn’t want no stinkin’ hot dog when I could have coq au vin!

    +another. i hated kids menus!! even worse, i was a really tall child and always looked older than i was, so from about 5 on, my parents had to ask for a kids menu and forced me to order from it! (probably for economy’s sake, in retrospect).

    #385657

    somertimeoh
    Participant

    More parents need to learn the “fear of God” stare as my family calls it. If for a second me or my sisters were anything other than well-behaved little people we got “the look” and that was all it took to know we better shape up or the evening was not going to end well.

    #385658

    Twixlen
    Participant

    I didn’t eat out much at all as a kid, and didn’t have my first “fine dining” experience until I was in my teens. However, whenever we were in public, I fully understood what behavior was expected of me, and that it was a treat to be ANYWHERE, and should I fall out of line, it would be a *very* long time before I saw anything but my own yard.

    Fast forward many years, and I did my stint in food service – first a chain steak joint (Hoss’s Steakhouse, anyone?) and then a semi-dive neighborhood bar. On Sunday’s, at Hoss’s, kids ate free. I can’t tell you what a special hell that was. And I like kids – they are dear little creatures and have very interesting things to say. I’m pretty sure these were actually a whole ‘nuther species, something that was born from wild animals. The bonus to that deal was that the parents wouldn’t tip based on number of meals served, but on the ticket – so, I’d get a couple bucks and spend the rest of my shift trying to get mashed potatoes off the carpet.

    Not that I’m bitter.

    The neighborhood dive bar had folks that would come in for lunch with their kids on very rare occasions, and it was always fine. They were almost always regulars, and knew the score.

    There is a strange seeming epidemic of people who don’t want to be inconvenienced for their kid’s behavior – or who maybe just don’t understand that sitting in the cart in the towel aisle at Target isn’t their idea of a fun afternoon.

    Mostly, I think good parenting goes unnoticed and underappreciated. It’s the bad parenting that we all seem to remember and scorn.

    #385659

    somertimeoh
    Participant

    Oooh, funny story. Family trip to LA when I was 10 or so and we’re eating at a Mexican restaurant. My older cousin was with us, he was probably 15 or 16. I was having a rough day and he was trying to cheer me up by poking eye and mouth holes in tortillas and talking to me through it. It was working, I was giggling like crazy. A kid at a near by table saw him and did the same thing and his parents jerked him up and walked him out (I’m assuming to get a spanking). I felt so bad, but it was pretty funny.

    #385660

    Tenzo
    Participant

    Any patron should be held to a certain minimal level of behavior.

    No throwing food at other tables, limited screaming (everyone cries some, children scream, adults talk loud into their cell phone. Just makeke sure it doesn’t go on for the whole meal.), no stinky pants or throwing up.

    As for visiting other tables. If you are not screaming I rather enjoy having people drop by my table during my meal.

    I’ve honestly objected to more adults behavior than chidrens.

    #385661
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Tenzo wrote >>
    Any patron should be held to a certain minimal level of behavior.
    No throwing food at other tables, limited screaming (everyone cries some, children scream, adults talk loud into their cell phone. Just makeke sure it doesn’t go on for the whole meal.), no stinky pants or throwing up.

    Had to reread the title to make sure you weren’t talking about frat boys or sorority girls. ;)

    #385662

    joev
    Participant

    somertimeoh wrote >>
    More parents need to learn the “fear of God” stare as my family calls it. If for a second me or my sisters were anything other than well-behaved little people we got “the look” and that was all it took to know we better shape up or the evening was not going to end well.

    We called that “Mom Eyes.” As in “What did I to to make you have Mom Eyes at me?”

    #385663

    somertimeoh
    Participant

    joev wrote >>

    somertimeoh wrote >>
    More parents need to learn the “fear of God” stare as my family calls it. If for a second me or my sisters were anything other than well-behaved little people we got “the look” and that was all it took to know we better shape up or the evening was not going to end well.

    We called that “Mom Eyes.” As in “What did I to to make you have Mom Eyes at me?”

    Ha! I like it. We also had the threat of a “coming to Jesus meeting” to “chat” about bad behavior when we got home. And my parents wonder why organized religion is a little scary to me :)

    #385664

    joev
    Participant

    somertimeoh wrote >>

    joev wrote >>

    somertimeoh wrote >>
    More parents need to learn the “fear of God” stare as my family calls it. If for a second me or my sisters were anything other than well-behaved little people we got “the look” and that was all it took to know we better shape up or the evening was not going to end well.

    We called that “Mom Eyes.” As in “What did I to to make you have Mom Eyes at me?”

    Ha! I like it. We also had the threat of a “coming to Jesus meeting” to “chat” about bad behavior when we got home. And my parents wonder why organized religion is a little scary to me :)

    I think the effect of folks not going to church anymore is that kids aren’t learning the valuable lessons of Catholic guilt anymore. I wasn’t a bad kid growing up because every time I did something bad, instead of hitting me or yelling at me or grounding me, they told me how disappointed in me they were.

    #385665

    somertimeoh
    Participant

    I pay a lot of money every week to work through the issues and baggage created by Catholic guilt, lol. I think my kids will be OK without it :)

    #385666
    Lauren Wilson
    Lauren Wilson
    Participant

    joev wrote >>

    somertimeoh wrote >>

    joev wrote >>

    somertimeoh wrote >>
    More parents need to learn the “fear of God” stare as my family calls it. If for a second me or my sisters were anything other than well-behaved little people we got “the look” and that was all it took to know we better shape up or the evening was not going to end well.

    We called that “Mom Eyes.” As in “What did I to to make you have Mom Eyes at me?”

    Ha! I like it. We also had the threat of a “coming to Jesus meeting” to “chat” about bad behavior when we got home. And my parents wonder why organized religion is a little scary to me :)

    I think the effect of folks not going to church anymore is that kids aren’t learning the valuable lessons of Catholic guilt anymore. I wasn’t a bad kid growing up because every time I did something bad, instead of hitting me or yelling at me or grounding me, they told me how disappointed in me they were.

    I was raised a godless heathen, and that’s all it took for me to snap into line too. I’m 31 years old, and to this day my father has still never raised his voice at me. Ever.

    #385667

    joev
    Participant

    osulew wrote >>

    joev wrote >>

    somertimeoh wrote >>

    joev wrote >>

    somertimeoh wrote >>
    More parents need to learn the “fear of God” stare as my family calls it. If for a second me or my sisters were anything other than well-behaved little people we got “the look” and that was all it took to know we better shape up or the evening was not going to end well.

    We called that “Mom Eyes.” As in “What did I to to make you have Mom Eyes at me?”

    Ha! I like it. We also had the threat of a “coming to Jesus meeting” to “chat” about bad behavior when we got home. And my parents wonder why organized religion is a little scary to me :)

    I think the effect of folks not going to church anymore is that kids aren’t learning the valuable lessons of Catholic guilt anymore. I wasn’t a bad kid growing up because every time I did something bad, instead of hitting me or yelling at me or grounding me, they told me how disappointed in me they were.

    I was raised a godless heathen, and that’s all it took for me to snap into line too. I’m 31 years old, and to this day my father has still never raised his voice at me. Ever.

    I think it might be even more effective to tell your kids they disappoint you, and then point at a statue of the Virgin Mary. Her kid was good.

    #385668
    Lauren Wilson
    Lauren Wilson
    Participant

    joev wrote >>

    osulew wrote >>

    joev wrote >>

    somertimeoh wrote >>

    joev wrote >>

    somertimeoh wrote >>
    More parents need to learn the “fear of God” stare as my family calls it. If for a second me or my sisters were anything other than well-behaved little people we got “the look” and that was all it took to know we better shape up or the evening was not going to end well.

    We called that “Mom Eyes.” As in “What did I to to make you have Mom Eyes at me?”

    Ha! I like it. We also had the threat of a “coming to Jesus meeting” to “chat” about bad behavior when we got home. And my parents wonder why organized religion is a little scary to me :)

    I think the effect of folks not going to church anymore is that kids aren’t learning the valuable lessons of Catholic guilt anymore. I wasn’t a bad kid growing up because every time I did something bad, instead of hitting me or yelling at me or grounding me, they told me how disappointed in me they were.

    I was raised a godless heathen, and that’s all it took for me to snap into line too. I’m 31 years old, and to this day my father has still never raised his voice at me. Ever.

    I think it might be even more effective to tell your kids they disappoint you, and then point at a statue of the Virgin Mary. Her kid was good.

    I didn’t buy into any of that as a kid, so that wouldn’t have affected me a whole lot.
    However, when I was really young, my mom got me to give up drinking from bottles by saying that Snoopy (my fave) called and said that bottles were not cool and that he’d bring me cool stuff if I put them in a basket and left them on the deck for him to pick up. I did, and I got sippy cups and all sorts of rad crap (from what I’m told) in return. So I guess I got the “comin’ to Snoopy” talk instead, eh?

    #385669

    JoeMitchell
    Member

    peppa pig videos on phone/ipod provide at least 20 minutes of golden silence

    #385670
    SJT
    SJT
    Participant

    Seems to me alot of this can be solved with a little common sense and courteousy. After walking into a space like Rigsby’s or Burgundy Room the environment speaks for itself. The first thing that comes to my mind isn’t, “I should go grab my 3 year old niece- she would LOVE this place”. :) Seriously. I mean Chucky Cheese serves beer, but do you see 21 year old college kids flocking there to get effed up& if they did wouldn’t THAT be considered inappropriate?? I love kids& I don’t see why thinking they probably don’t belong in fine dining establishments or bars should make me or anyone seem like anti-kid. This topic makes people a bit irrational for no reason.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 132 total)

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