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Kids in Restaurants

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  • #385641
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    joev wrote >>

    SusanB wrote >>
    And I usually don’t like kids, especially in restaurants for all of the already mentioned antics.

    What?

    *scratch head*

    You LIKE seeing some precious snowflake screaming it’s lungs out while it throws things?

    #385642

    joev
    Participant

    rus wrote >>

    joev wrote >>

    SusanB wrote >>
    And I usually don’t like kids, especially in restaurants for all of the already mentioned antics.

    What?

    *scratch head*
    You LIKE seeing some precious snowflake screaming it’s lungs out while it throws things?

    No, just from everything else SusanB has said, she wouldn’t let that comment stand if “kids” were replaced with “gays” or “blacks” or “elderly people.” To claim to usually dislike a whole group of people is pretty bigoted behavior.

    #385643

    KSquared
    Member

    dru wrote >>
    i think the original comment on the Knead thread was not about taking children to restaurants/bars nor their subsequent behavior once inside; but @roy asking why people with children think every restaurant/bar should cater to those with kids by having highchairs and changing tables and should profusely apologize if they don’t. it got derailed by the @slayerfaith who then chose to send all people with children to a suburban Applebee’s.
    i do tend to find myself agreeing with @roy about the expectation. i would agree that the expectation that every restaurant/bar will have those accommodations is presumptuous. i would also agree that restaurants/bars are losing potential customers by not making those accommodations.
    one of my worst dining experiences in Columbus was not ruined by the child, but by the parents who spent over an hour at the table next to ours at Spagio loudly bemoaning the lack of child friendly restrooms at a wine bar.
    on the other hand during my most recent visit there 2 women came in and one had a small baby in a carrier. she set the carrier down next to her, they each had a glass of wine and a dessert and then the went along. no expectation of Spagio needing x or y for their patronage.

    Well stated Dru, as always. I think that some children can go to almost any restaurant, but that the parents will have to expect that not every restaurant will be able to accommodate them equally.

    #385644
    SJT
    SJT
    Participant

    I am torn on this as well. I have taken well behaved 5-7 years olds to nicer restaurants in the past& had a fine time. I usually would go EARLY early though- like 5-5:30. I am starting to think though that we have a bit too much of a “take my kid wherever I go ” attitude anymore. I don’t know why EVERYTHING has to be kid friendly these days. Some things should be left as adult only& we shouldn’t feel bad for wanting that. I think it is about respecting what the owners of an establishment- whether it be a bar that serves food or a high-end restaurant- want their space to be. I think these are a few good guide lines for knowing if a place is appropriate for children or not: Does the restaurant have a kids’ menu? Do they have booster chairs? Does a bar take up most of the space? Answering these questions can sometimes lead to the purpose that the owners have intended and the atmosphere they wanted to create. That is not to say that they will not accomodate someone with kids, because clearly MOST will. Perhaps though we shouldn’t force that upon them or the other customers who are looking to dine there specifically bc they know they won’t encounter the possiblilty of loud, fussy little ones.

    #385645
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    joev wrote >>

    rus wrote >>

    joev wrote >>

    SusanB wrote >>
    And I usually don’t like kids, especially in restaurants for all of the already mentioned antics.

    What?

    *scratch head*
    You LIKE seeing some precious snowflake screaming it’s lungs out while it throws things?

    No, just from everything else SusanB has said, she wouldn’t let that comment stand if “kids” were replaced with “gays” or “blacks” or “elderly people.” To claim to usually dislike a whole group of people is pretty bigoted behavior.

    Think you and I are seeing different things in her comment. The “for all of the already mentioned antics” doesn’t strike you as a dislike of the behavior?

    #385646

    misskitty
    Participant

    I too have always had really good luck taking my son out to dinner since he was real little.
    I do always make sure to clean up after him because kids can be messy eaters and I always had an activity pack in my purse just in case. But his table manners are 100% on point because I was taught at a young age what table manners are and I passed that on to him as soon as he left the high chair. He also has never thrown a fit in a restaurant thank god. And you know I understand that kids get up set and sometimes cry or whale at the top of their lungs That does not bother me too much I get more pissed at the parents that don’t do anything about it. Shouldn’t they coddle or hug or take the kid our side? I think so but some dick’s don’t and would prefer that everyone suffer with them. uuuggghhhh
    Now that he is eight he has moved passed the shitty kids menu offering the same random crap at every single place. He has moved on to exciting food it makes me happy because there is more to life then shitty pizza and chicken fingers. lol

    #385647

    Elizabeth Lessner
    Participant

    KSquared, you and your child are dreamy! I wish I could wait on both of you every day.

    #385648
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    SusanB wrote >>
    Chris and April brought their little boy to a CU dim sum meetup and he was a total joy! Cute, tried everything, and extremely well behaved.

    Thanks! We’ve been taking R out since he was tiny and he’s usually very good. However, now that he’s in the “terrible twos” he’s a bit less reliable –so I can’t be too quick to say that parenting is the whole difference. After all, we’re not doing anything different now than we used to.

    That said, we don’t usually take him any place too upscale, and we try to be quick to get him out of there if he starts acting up. We definitely don’t linger in restaurants anymore.

    For us, at least, if we’re splurging on a really nice restaurant, we’d rather not have the kids along anyway –at least not until they’re considerably older. We do want them to be exposed to a lot of different cuisines, but we eat fairly diverse even at home anyway.

    #385649

    KSquared
    Member

    lizless wrote >>
    KSquared, you and your child are dreamy! I wish I could wait on both of you every day.

    Awww, thanks! We love the BFR! Betty’s mac and cheese is her favorite :)

    #385650
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    If a *restaurant owner* wants to make their environment for adults only, they should have some sort of “no one under 18 allowed” sign on the door. Problem solved.

    If a *customer* wants to go around telling other people that they’re not welcome to spend their money in any particular restaurant if they have kids with them, well… I don’t really think that’s their call to make.

    Frankly, if I were a restaurant owner and I encountered someone telling other people whether or not they’re welcome in my establishment for *any* reason, I’d probably kick that person out.

    #385651

    Talcott
    Member

    I went to plenty of restaurants as a kid. My siblings and I practically grew up in The Dube. The thing is, eating out was a treat. It was something that we wanted to do, but didn’t get to do all that often. And it was understood that if we acted up, we would leave and wouldn’t get to go out again (at least for a while).

    As an adult, I love to see kids in unexpected places. I have no way of proving this, but I’d be willing to bet that kids who go to “adult” restaurants grow up with better dining-out related social skills than those who only get to go to “family style” places. Sure, it can be annoying if the kids are loud and screaming, but I’ve encountered that much more often at Bob Evan’s than I ever have at smaller places.

    #385652

    kitty
    Member

    rus wrote >>

    KSquared wrote >>
    I think what most people object to are *poorly* behaved kids and parents who are not willing to be flexible and compromise.

    Yes, exactly.
    A well behaved kid ( i.e. the absence of screaming meltdowns, throwing food, running from table to table, etc. ) isn’t a problem.

    +1 I totally agree w this and I am very anti-kid in general. I live in a pretty kid free zone so its easy for me to forget they exist sometimes. If there is a little one just being happy or otherwise unnoticeable at a restaurant its fine with me.

    #385653

    dmorris614
    Participant

    Kids in restuarants are fine by me. It’s when they start screaming/acting up that I have an issue with their parents.

    #385654

    SusanB
    Participant

    Ok, to clarify:

    Yes it is true I am not overly fond of children, go ahead accuse me of being an ageist. But it is the actions of the children (which I mostly blame the parents for) that I find objectionable, not the state of childhood itself. I was once a child, so I have hope for all the children out there that one day they may become adults. So I guess I should really say that I don’t like most parents, not children. Better? Parenthood (hopefully) is a choice, and not an inherent state of being (as being black, white, gay, female, etc.).

    #385655

    Bear
    Participant

    I’m not particularly fond of having anyone, child or adult, make ridiculous amounts of noise near me in a restaurant.

    That said, one of my clearest childhood memories is from a restaurant we went to on vacation. A family at an adjacent table had a young boy, a few years younger than I was, who was pretty unhappy and kept starting to make noise. His father snapped at him abruptly and loudly, jabbing an index finger in his little chest, to quiet him down. Finally the father hauled off and cuffed the boy across the side of the head. Hard. Not another word, while the adults ate, talked, and laughed.

    From our table, stony silence. When we left, for the first and only time in my life, I heard my father refer to another human being as garbage.

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