Our City Online

Messageboard - Dining

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

Jobu Ramen

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Dining Jobu Ramen

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 70 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1019654

    futureman
    Participant

    Ramen is on my list of… too easy to make at home… list to actually purchase for 5 X the markup. Took some flack on here once when I said the same thing of Dirty Franks.<br>
    However, the topic comes up enough here I’m sure this will be a success with the right quality to price ratio. Just like Dirty Frank’s.

    This statement is laughable, you are comparing warming up hotdogs and putting on interesting toppings vs something that takes true skill to make the broth just right. Have you ever had real ramen? I just got back from Tokyo so I’ll be interested to see how it compares.

    #1019658

    Schoolboy
    Participant

    This statement is laughable, you are comparing warming up hotdogs and putting on interesting toppings vs something that takes true skill to make the broth just right. Have you ever had real ramen? I just got back from Tokyo so I’ll be interested to see how it compares.

    The answer to your question is yes. Many times.
    Secondly, I already make my own broth and have been doing so for years.
    Like I said, I took some flack on here from Dirty Frank fans.
    Have also been packaging my own sausages and brats for years as well.
    Lastly, I have most of the items that go into good ramen and on fancy hotdogs/brats in the fridge at least at some point through any given week.
    When I’ve had a long day ramen is a pretty good go to for dinner and I never get a complaint from anyone in my family.

    If you want to put my on blast for something, then stick with the noodles. I no longer make fresh pasta all that often anymore. Is it going to be worth me paying that much more for fresh ramen noodles? Not for me. I’m sure many will and I think this place will do quite well.

    #1019671
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    You can also drink beer at home much cheaper than you can at a bar. Don’t have to tip yourself either.

    #1019673

    futureman
    Participant

    You can also drink beer at home much cheaper than you can at a bar. Don’t have to tip yourself either.

    Why stop there! It’s much cheaper to just make it yourself.

    #1019677

    Schoolboy
    Participant

    Sorry but I feel and I’m sure many more will agree.. but there is a LOT more skill and equipment that goes into making good beer than there is into making good broth.

    Not even a remotely close comparison.

    #1019698

    futureman
    Participant

    Why go out a restaurant at all when you can make it at home for much less then?

    Anyway …

    I get it, you can make real ramen at home it tastes reasonably good. I thought it might be you were talking about using the instant or the package versions you can buy at asian grocery stores, so my apologies. Not that many people I know can make ramen from scratch, unlike say cooking a prepackaged hotdog and throwing some crazy toppings on it.

    #1019709
    Chrysee
    Chrysee
    Participant

    Sorry but I feel and I’m sure many more will agree.. but there is a LOT more skill and equipment that goes into making good beer than there is into making good broth.

    Not even a remotely close comparison.

    As someone who makes good beer, it’s not as involved as you’d think. It’s a little more complicated than giant pot full of good ingredients, but it’s still a giant pot full of good ingredients with a few extra toys. The biggest difference is how much cleaning and how much waiting is involved.

    And yes, I do get the point you’re trying to make. But homebrewing is fun and not all that intimidating :)

    #1019712

    drew
    Participant

    Sorry but I feel and I’m sure many more will agree.. but there is a LOT more skill and equipment that goes into making good beer than there is into making good broth.

    Not even a remotely close comparison.

    Well, I’d disagree, at least on the skill part… if you’re doing it right.

    The good stuff, the really top notch stuff that is actually fairly commonplace in Japan but harder to find in the US, takes tremendous labor, skill, and time. And, not to sound too much like a corksniffer, but the honest truth of the matter is that nobody in town is doing it anywhere close to that level. Not by a long shot. And I’d eagerly include Jobu in that assessment.

    So, lets split the difference – you probably could do something like what you’re getting elsewhere in town without too much difficulty, and good on ya for it, but don’t confuse that with really good ramen.

    #1019719

    melikecheese
    Participant

    That’s awesome that you make your own broth and soup at home! I’m jealous.

    I don’t think it’s that unheard of for people to be able to cook quality meals at home. It’s all pretty easy once you learn how to do it, even if it is a bit time consuming. On the flipside, the massive amounts of money good places to eat can rake in also prove that for everyone who would rather cook it at home, at least 1 person exists who would rather pay for it.

    #1019743
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Not even a remotely close comparison.

    I wasn’t comparing the craft in making them. I was just saying that if your only criteria for consuming goods and services is price, then you never need to set foot in a restaurant or bar ever again.

    But hey, pickling your own vegetables, brewing your own beer and sewing clothes for your children is a pretty hip thing to do. ;)

    #1019769

    Schoolboy
    Participant

    As someone who makes good beer, it’s not as involved as you’d think. It’s a little more complicated than giant pot full of good ingredients, but it’s still a giant pot full of good ingredients with a few extra toys. The biggest difference is how much cleaning and how much waiting is involved.

    And yes, I do get the point you’re trying to make. But homebrewing is fun and not all that intimidating :)

    I can agree with that to a point.

    I have mysteriously slightly contaminated one too many batches of home brew only to find out months later. Yes, I also make my own brew every fall with fresh ingredients as well, but I’m by no means anything more than an amateur. Have never contaminated a batch of broth yet to this day with an unpleasant taste like I have beer that’s for sure.

    Maybe I’m just weird, but broth is extremely easy to make imo. All it takes is time, ingredients, and patience. In regards to it being an art form. Sure. So is packaging your own hot dogs/brats in certain circles. In my opinion both take about the same amount of skill set.

    That being said, I do dine out on the occasion with the family and greatly enjoy doing so. Finding out about new food places is my favorite thing about this site. However, my reasoning of dining out may be a little different than others. I dine out when I see something new, something that I can experience and possibly take home to try my hand at recreating. At the least, to get new ideas on improving my own skill sets at home.

    Not so sure there isn’t anything new that they will be doing with ramen that I haven’t already tried. I will say this though… I can probably count on 1 hand the number of times that I’ve made ramen that I didn’t add cilantro. Didn’t notice cilantro in any of the pics and found that at least somewhat interesting on why not.

    #1019771

    mbeaumont
    Participant

    So has anyone tried the goddamn ramen yet?

    #1019776

    drew
    Participant

    Yes, and here’s my take on Jobu after one visit: noodles are pretty darned good, broths are so-so… not unlike Rishi, really.

    Went on the first day, and encountered lots of oddities that may just be opening hiccups, such as – they served all of the bowls without enough broth (noodles were piled way above the broth line), toppings didn’t match menu descriptions (though most were good), and several of the dishes were way oversalted. The pork belly buns seemed especially overpriced for what we were given… charge Michael Chang prices when you’re serving his level of product.

    If they can get past that stuff, it’ll probably be pretty close in quality to what Noodlecat does in Cleveland, which to me is a reasonably good place that doesn’t match the exceptional quality of everything else the chef does elsewhere.

    #1019800

    RBloodworth
    Participant

    I think you’re thinking of David Chang (Michael Chang was a tennis player), but I got what you were saying. That’s kind of disappointing to hear, although I wasn’t expecting authentic Japanese-style ramen in the first place (if you’re looking for that, Tensuke Market’s cafe is the place to go). Hopefully, they can work out the kinks, as there is definitely a niche in this city for this kind of restaurant.

    #1019835
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Hopefully, they can work out the kinks, as there is definitely a niche in this city for this kind of restaurant.

    I’ve got to think there’s always some opening bugs. Figure it’s worth waiting a bit to check them out.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 70 total)

The forum ‘Dining’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Subscribe to the Columbus Underground YouTube channel for exclusive interviews and news updates!

CLICK HERE TO SUBSCRIBE