Our City Online

Messageboard - Dining

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

Jeni's recall

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Dining Jeni's recall

Viewing 15 posts - 181 through 195 (of 199 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1090812
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    from craft to out-sourced corporate what will the localvore DIY’s do? Will a $10 pint cost less if they are outsourcing production, somehow spending that much cash on ice cream begins to seem crass when the local flavor seems to be lost.

    #1090813

    CB_downtowner
    Participant

    over Jeni’s, can we just stick a fork in them?

    I really hope not. It’s always great to see local businesses that are uniquely Columbus see success in other markets. I’m really hoping they get this figured out.

    #1091084
    MichaelC
    MichaelC
    Participant

    Jeni chimes in with an extensive essay.

    An excerpt:

    [W]e’re entering a new era at Jeni’s. We are re-opening our kitchen, but not to freeze our ice cream there. Instead, our kitchen team will focus solely on the parts of making our ice cream that only we can do. In turn, we’ll rely on a network of growers, producers, and makers to do the things they do well—if not better than us—and together, as a community, we’ll make ice creams that are better, safer, and more consistent than before.

    We’ll continue to source all of the ingredients for our ice creams, same as before. But we’ll use our kitchen only to prepare the highest priority ingredients for our most difficult ice creams—process work that, without the specialized equipment of our kitchen or the expertise of our kitchen team, is nearly impossible for others to do—and then we’ll freeze everything into ice cream at Smith’s, rather than in our own kitchen.

    #1091126

    DouginCMH
    Participant

    The problem with this is that it clearly wasn’t the plan. Jeni’s is spinning this – and one can imagine why. I wish them luck in pulling it off. Fact is, their existing production facility was inadequate; that was discussed rather clearly during the whole Stone2Cbus episode, when the city’s proposal to Stone called for a downtown food and beverage district, to include a new production facility for Jeni’s. So one can imagine a scenario where, at some point, Jeni’s said, we need a better place to make this ice cream, and perhaps looked to a place like Smith’s as an option instead of building their own, new facility. That would have gotten news coverage, and probably the usual snarky comments from posters here on CU, but probably wouldn’t have been a big deal (especially in markets outside of Columbus).

    Of course, that’s not what happened.

    That said, there is no inherent reason why ice cream made at Smith’s can’t be just as good as ice cream produced in Jeni’s former facility. Something similar happens in the craft beer industry all the time. The equipment to make ice cream isn’t going to vary too much from factory to factory. Jeni’s isn’t changing it’s ingredient list (since they out-grew Snowville and switched to Smith’s). If they’re in charge of the process and ingredients, the end product could be great. ‘Out-sourced’ seems like a rather hyperbolic term to use in this instance. Jeni’s had a very close business relationship with Smith’s before the listeria hit the fan several months ago. It’s clear that relationship is now a lot more foundational. What I’d like to hear from Jeni’s is a detailed breakdown of how this is all going to work; how will they oversee quality control at Smith’s.

    The Columbus Business First article about this (http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2015/08/30/jenis-production-kitchen-is-back-but-with-a.html) states:

    “The company declined to answer questions about its new production process.”

    Well, that’s kinds dumb. They’ll certainly need to answer those questions at some point. They did answer a lot of questions about dealing with listeria, and they seem to have implemented a structure that – this lay person – looks much more robust (and have hired a new Quality Leader; someone who’s worked at Marzetti’s for 23 years).

    Great. Now they need to come clean regarding the details of the new production structure, start making a large selection of ice cream that’s as good as they used to make, reassess their marketing plan, and hope for the best.

    I rarely buy Jeni’s ice cream (it’s always been out of my price range), but I would hate for them to go under. Jeni is a very vocal and sincere proponent for all things Columbus. She’s known nationally. We lose Jeni’s, and we lose that spokesperson (as well as a decent chunk of jobs, and a lot of very good ice cream).

    #1091131
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    It is some clever spin. “This is the future as we intended it, or something.”

    #1091191
    Lauren Wilson
    Lauren Wilson
    Participant

    I hate to say it, but I’m kinda with a few others here. I wish them well, but I REALLY just don’t even care one way or the other any more.

    #1091241

    GeeDee
    Participant

    Extensive essay indeed. I read it and lost track of the fact we’re talking about….ice cream.

    “we bring people together”
    “to say we do things differently is an understatement”
    “we’ve spent a lot of time soul searching and asking a lot of hard questions”
    “what makes Jeni’s Jeni’s? What is it that we do that only we can do?
    “our recipe is unique in the world of ice cream. It can’t be made just anywhere”
    “there is nothing easy about how we do what we do”
    “we live in the 21st century. None of the old rules apply. We are free to break things apart and put them back together in ways that we couldn’t do before”

    Seriously. Get over yourself. You make ice cream. Tasty ice cream – yes. But, c’mon.

    #1091263

    Roland
    Participant

    The move makes a lot of sense to me. They can prep all the weird and wonderful components in their kitchen. While much of the listeria risk and the boring bulky operation of mixing of tons of dairy in really cold machines moves elsewhere.

    They probably should have done this a long time ago.

    I miss a few flavors that Jeni’s used to make. I hope this works out.

    #1091265

    Nancy H
    Participant

    The problem with this is that it clearly wasn’t the plan. Jeni’s is spinning this – and one can imagine why. I wish them luck in pulling it off. Fact is, their existing production facility was inadequate.
    …middle snipped…
    I rarely buy Jeni’s ice cream (it’s always been out of my price range), but I would hate for them to go under. Jeni is a very vocal and sincere proponent for all things Columbus. She’s known nationally. We lose Jeni’s, and we lose that spokesperson (as well as a decent chunk of jobs, and a lot of very good ice cream).

    Being shut down all this time had to be financially draining. Even if they were/are planning to build new production facilities, that takes time too.

    I am just guessing here, but considering they had problems with Listeria twice, and it has taken so long to get pack into production, I think they never did figure out how/where/when Listeria got into their ice cream. Although Listeria is often present in unpasteurized milk, it is also present in soil, so easily transferred to fruits and vegetables. Having three separate facilities (prep kitchen, production kitchen, and Smith’s for ice cream making) gives them better testing control through the process.

    Jeni’s has many signature flavors. Compiling those ingredients in their own production kitchen allows them to keep the ingredients secret. Sharing the recipes with another ice cream maker would not be a smart business move.

    It does not bother me that they are now using Smith’s for their milk. Smith Dairy sources grass grazed milk for them, just like Snowville did, as did the five other dairies they used before Snowville. Snowville gets their milk from eleven different farms. Smiths gets their milk from lots of small dairy farmers too, just more of them.

    #1091279
    Anne Evans
    Anne Evans
    Keymaster

    I think it’s great that Jeni’s staying an Ohio company.

    I read through her letter and thought it must have been so tough to have to come to terms with your end goal being changed and essentially going away.

    I see this move as a way for them to really focus on amazing and innovative flavors. While it sounds beautiful, having your own fields of produce and cows and everything that comes with that -I couldn’t tell if Jeni was wanting to get into the dairy industry with her own herd or not…probably not since it would be 1,000 cows and that gets into mega-dairies which doesn’t seem to be their story…so she probably thought a couple of pretty cows roaming around- doesn’t sound practical and I love their story of community so I agree it’s best to let others do what they do best and support them.

    #1091361

    CbusOSU
    Participant

    Call me crazy, but I will support Jeni not only for commitment to excellence and entrepreneurial spirit, but also for how much she has given back to this community. She has given extensively to Columbus over the years, and her love for this city was never more evident in the “love letter” she wrote to us several years back.

    Let’s also comment upon her culinary chops. I don’t know of another James Beard Award winners in our city. Although we claim to have a burgeoning culinary scene, there isn’t anyone else being featured in magazines like Food & Wine, etc, and there’s only two four diamond AAA restaurants. This is by no means a knock on our amazing city, but Jeni at least puts us on the culinary map.

    HOMAGE or Lamp, time for a “Jeni’s till I die” shirt to match our “Columbus” ones.

    #1091395

    DouginCMH
    Participant

    Business Business First has a few more details:

    http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2015/09/01/jeni-opens-up-about-that-2nd-listeria-shutdown-the.html

    As I said, the timing, and perhaps the somewhat too celebratory nature of the company’s marketing recently, make the decision to permanently transfer all production to Smith’s hard to see as anything other than something forced on the company. Still, the reasons she lays out for the move are pretty logical. And I appreciate the details about how this can honestly be seen as an improvement in the way the company has made ice cream historically. Smith’s has a much better facility than Jeni’s has ever had; the ice cream will get produced more quickly under this production scheme.

    Though I do wonder at the $50 million pricetag for a new facility. I mean, what do I really know about building an ice cream factory? Very little. But $50 million is a staggering sum.

    #1091503
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    Business Business First has a few more details:

    http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2015/09/01/jeni-opens-up-about-that-2nd-listeria-shutdown-the.html

    As I said, the timing, and perhaps the somewhat too celebratory nature of the company’s marketing recently, make the decision to permanently transfer all production to Smith’s hard to see as anything other than something forced on the company. Still, the reasons she lays out for the move are pretty logical. And I appreciate the details about how this can honestly be seen as an improvement in the way the company has made ice cream historically. Smith’s has a much better facility than Jeni’s has ever had; the ice cream will get produced more quickly under this production scheme.

    Though I do wonder at the $50 million pricetag for a new facility. I mean, what do I really know about building an ice cream factory? Very little. But $50 million is a staggering sum.

    On that, is “local artisan ice cream” made in gigantic batches in $50M production facilities?

    #1091519

    joev
    Participant

    So much hate and indifference. When one of you does as much for Columbus as Jeni has, let me know.

    #1091526

    Nancy H
    Participant

    According to this $50,000 is a low number

    Jeni’s is local artisan to us, but just really good ice cream in other areas. They are a growing business with locations in Cleveland, Nashville, Chicago, Atlanta, and Charleston.

Viewing 15 posts - 181 through 195 (of 199 total)

The forum ‘Dining’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Subscribe below: