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Is Ohio a Southern state?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Politics Is Ohio a Southern state?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 26 total)
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  • #99104

    Mike Hansen
    Participant

    Tea Party radicalism is misunderstood: Meet the “Newest Right”

    http://www.salon.com/2013/10/06/tea_party_radicalism_is_misunderstood_meet_the_newest_right/

    Ohio is controlled by “Southern local notables” referred to in article

    “The Solid South. By means of partisan and racial gerrymandering—packing white liberal voters into conservative majority districts and ghettoizing black and Latino voters–Republicans in Texas and other Southern and Western states control the U.S. Congress, even though in the last election more Americans voted for Democrats than Republicans. The same undemocratic technique makes the South far more Republican in its political representation than it really is in terms of voters.”

    #552822
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    A: No.

    #552823

    dubdave00
    Participant

    I suppose if “controlled by ‘Southern local notables'” defines our status as “southern”, then maybe.

    Granted, I would never define a state’s identity by who “controls” it politically at the moment, save really solid states.

    Our history as a free state / “northern”, and even the past two Presidential elections (Both for Obama), suggest we’re not southern.

    Some people joke that once you go south of I-70 or I-270, you’ve hit “the south”.

    I do enjoy Michael Lind’s writing sometimes. His book “The Radical Center” introduced me to the concepts in the Affordable Care Act back in the early 2000s.

    #552824

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    I think there are certainly southern sympathies present in Ohio, particularly in many rural and suburban areas south of I-70. But if you were to split the state north to south along I-70, I think you would find the north to be more or less about as reliably “yankee” as any New England/North Atlantic state. Even Republicans in the northern part of the state tend to be more moderate, even borderline liberal than their southern counterparts (e.g. George Voinovich, Steve LaTourette).

    But no, I don’t think we are a Southern state by any measure or means. Once the GOP’s last bulwark of gerrymandering is broken or otherwise subverted by the opposition (read not necessarily capital D democratic), and they get routed, this will become a lot more evident.

    #552825

    rory
    Participant

    Ohio is a northern state with some southern cities in it.

    #552826

    Coops
    Member

    Ohioans are just rude southerners :)

    I lived in Columbus for 30 years and moved to Atlanta 4 years ago. Outside of Cleveland and the (former) manufacturing areas, attitudes among whites in Ohio are indistinguishable from “southern” attitudes.

    As a northerner you inherit these stereotypes about southerners and consider yourself to be so different. With some outside perspective I chuckle about that now – I encountered more racism, religiousity and downright ignorance in Columbus than I ever have in Atlanta.

    It is really more about urban/rural split than north/south. Take Michelle Bachmann from MN as an example. We in the south just happen to have a lower proportion of urban areas down here and so tend to go red in elections. Look to Texas though where that is changing quickly thanks to growth in Houston, Dallas, Austin etc.

    #552827

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    To me, it really seems that when nu-country got big in the early-mid ’90s, along with the increased popularity of full-size pickups and NASCAR, that people in semi-rural and rural Ohio (and even some suburbs) started acting a lot more Southern. Most of those people that switched over to being Southerners were more like people from say, Iowa and Illinois in the ’80s and before.

    #552828

    Twixlen
    Participant

    I don’t think racism is a southern “value” necessarily. There are plenty of places in rural New England that are very white, and very entrenched in tea partiness. They are just generally Democratically controlled states, and so districts haven’t been reconfigured to create power within those pockets.

    #552829

    gramarye
    Participant

    Walker said:
    A: No.

    ^ This. The rest is just details.

    #552830

    myliftkk
    Participant

    Coops said:
    As a northerner you inherit these stereotypes about southerners and consider yourself to be so different. With some outside perspective I chuckle about that now – I encountered more racism, religiousity and downright ignorance in Columbus than I ever have in Atlanta.

    The Atlanta megapolis is a poor representative of the broader southern attitdues. I can assure you there exists ignorance aplenty in the south.

    OH doesn’t even compare, especially when you look at the institutionalization of those attitudes.

    #552831

    Jordans23000
    Participant

    OH doesn’t even compare, especially when you look at the institutionalization of those attitudes.

    Yes, thank you.

    #552832

    Mike Hansen
    Participant

    @Twixlen, I grew up on the Northwest Side of Chicago in the 70s and it was very racist. And it is still racist today, not as bad as the 70s though. When I asked the question, I was mainly thinking about the gerrymandering of the districts. And that in spite of being about to re-elect Sherrod Brown and go for Obama in 2012, we are stuck with sending a vast majority of representatives to Congress and with the entire state government controlled by the right wing Southern types.

    #552833

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    myliftkk said:
    The Atlanta megapolis is a poor representative of the broader southern attitdues. I can assure you there exists ignorance aplenty in the south.

    OH doesn’t even compare, especially when you look at the institutionalization of those attitudes.

    +1, we’ve got our issues here in Buckeye Land to be sure, but spend some time in Alabama or Mississippi if you want some real perspective.

    #1088485

    tcp1980
    Participant

    I am a born and bred Ohioan…from Southwestern Ohio. Ohio is complex mix of regional affiliations. To me, Ohio is where East, North, South, and to a certain extent, the West meet. Cleveland and Cincinnati are about as different as two cities in one state can be. I have seen on this thread mentions of the I-70 split, which for the most part I agree with. Northern Ohio was primarily settled by New England and Eastern states(Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, and Pennsylvania), whereas much of southern Ohio was settled by Virginians, Kentuckians, and Tennesseeans. I am predominantly of Southern lineage. Of my four grandparents, three were born in Ohio and one in Tennessee. However, out of my eight great-grandparents, four were born in Kentucky, two in Ohio, and two in Tennessee. Something that is often overlooked is the early Twentieth Century influx of Appalachian immigrants into Ohio for economic opportunity. The three towns I am most closely affiliated with, and have primarily lived in, were settled by Pennsylvanians and New Jerseyans. Carlisle was once known as “Jersey Settlement”, Miamisburg and Germantown were both settled by Pennsylvania Germans. As a rule, Ohio would probably best qualify as a Northern state from my perspective. The Northwest Ordinance of 1787, one of the first acts of the new American government under the Constitution established the “Northwest Territory”. A significant aspect of that document was the prohibition of slavery in all of the states in that region(Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin). During the Civil War, Ohio provided the third highest number of soldiers to the Union behind only New York and Pennsylvania. I went to college in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and in the two major Civil War battles in that area, Union units from my native area in Ohio provided a large proportion of the forces. Not to mention, Generals William Rosecrans, Ulysses Grant, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Phil Sheridan were all Ohioans. My Southern classmates classified me as a “damn Yankee”, but of course few in Ohio consider themselves “Yankees” in the traditional sense. In the end, Ohio has a small identity crisis. Rebel flags are common in the southern and rural areas of the state, but as a rule, I would say Ohio is solidly northern. In fact, ask any Ohio State Buckeyes fan how they feel about the SEC(Southeastern Conference) in college athletics, and I think you will find the majority of Buckeyes reveal their true loyalties through such a simple cultural identification.

    #1088489
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    I cook with lard?

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