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Is cu mssgebrd just a crclejrk of frnds who try to be cool?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Everyday Chit Chat Is cu mssgebrd just a crclejrk of frnds who try to be cool?

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Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 214 total)
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  • #385946

    Cookie
    Member

    Core_Models wrote >>
    ETA: Pointing out that crepe eating Grandview homeowners probably have no clue what its like to [i]have[/i] to work at Wal-Mart or [i]have[/i] to shop there was my purpose for pulling those posts. Just like pulling his thread that he started about how awesome a Target downtown would be was to point out his hypocrisy.

    This is what’s bullshit. You don’t know anything about this person other than he (I don’t even know if it’s a he.) currently owns a house in a nice neighborhood and ate a crepe once. That’s not enough information to draw that sort of conclusion and it still doesn’t disqualify his opinion. And I think the person that started the Target thread was a different person who had actually worked at Target.

    #385947

    pez
    Participant

    For the record, I suggested a CU meetup at the [url=https://www.columbusunderground.com/5-things-you-probably-didnt-know-columbus-had]nude Westerville Swim[/url]. Much more inclusive than a CU circle jerk.

    #385948

    rus
    Participant

    pez wrote >>
    For the record, I suggested a CU meetup at the [url=https://www.columbusunderground.com/5-things-you-probably-didnt-know-columbus-had]nude Westerville Swim[/url]. Much more inclusive than a CU circle jerk.

    #385949

    jackoh
    Participant

    Having read the initial post in this thread, I have, up until now, avoided it like the plague. Because I had a fear that the initial premise would, instead of being artfully refuted, simply be confirmed in the responses. Whether or not that has proven to be the case, I will not comment on. But I do want to make one comment, which I will leave to be somewhat enigmatic, and for those of you who don’t understand the reference, don’t worry about it.
    There is a dimension, to some extent, of “Lord of the Flies” in CU.

    #385950

    chaptal
    Participant

    jackoh wrote >>
    Having read the initial post in this thread, I have, up until now, avoided it like the plague. Because I had a fear that the initial premise would, instead of being artfully refuted, simply be confirmed in the responses. Whether or not that has proven to be the case, I will not comment on. But I do want to make one comment, which I will leave to be somewhat enigmatic, and for those of you who don’t understand the reference, don’t worry about it.
    There is a dimension, to some extent, of “Lord of the Flies” in CU.

    Who has the conch now?

    #385951

    catnfiddle
    Participant

    Great. Now I’m picturing a hapless newcomer showing up to a happy hour and being greeting with the chant of, “Kill, Kill the N00B!”

    #385952

    jackoh
    Participant

    I think that you’ve seen the film rather than reading the book. That’s not the point at all.

    #385953

    rus
    Participant

    catnfiddle wrote >>
    Great. Now I’m picturing a hapless newcomer showing up to a happy hour and being greeting with the chant of, “Kill, Kill the N00B!”

    Replace “hapless newcomer” with “babbling lunatic wearing a sandwich board stating ‘REPENT NOW WAL-MART SINNER'”.

    When it’s mentioned you’ve seen someone else wearing that same sandwich board, the lunatic says: “Yeah, I stole it from a homeless guy but so what, you’re a dick!”.

    Then he follows you around calling you a dick while others gather to point and laugh.

    Then someone mentions there’s flan for dessert, which everyone complains is overrated ( no matter what the special ingredient is ) so they talk about their pets.

    #385954

    jackoh
    Participant

    Rus gets it!

    #385955

    catnfiddle
    Participant

    So glad that wasn’t my actual experience for my first Happy Hour! True, I wandered around aimlessly not knowing anyone. I finally started mumbling “streetcar” until someone (I think it was Sherm) took pity on me. It was a pleasant gathering without any snarking or jerking that I can recall.

    There’s a film version of [i]Lord of the Flies[/i]?

    #385956

    jackoh
    Participant

    catnfiddle wrote >>
    So glad that wasn’t my actual experience for my first Happy Hour! True, I wandered around aimlessly not knowing anyone. I finally started mumbling “streetcar” until someone (I think it was Sherm) took pity on me. It was a pleasant gathering without any snarking or jerking that I can recall.
    There’s a film version of [i]Lord of the Flies[/i]?

    Yes. Richard Brooks directed and William Golding was present for the production(I don’t recall if he wrote the screenplay). As usual when literature is translated into film much (as is often the case, the essential) was lost. But the interaction in the meetups is not how most people experience CU. It’s rather the society, and its members and their organization, and their familiarities and their alliances as it’s experienced in print on the web that defines the experience of CU for lots of people. This experience can be, as most in life, exhilirating, humbling, offputting or any number of other things that occur when you step into a group that already has established interrelations, but is willing to say come on in and interact. But, as Golding demonstrates groups of people are like animals in that they mark their territory and when you enter, you have to have picked up the scent and understood how the pack is organized.

    #385957

    L.I. to Buckeye
    Participant

    jackoh wrote >>
    There is a dimension, to some extent, of “Lord of the Flies” in CU.

    I think this is pretty over-dramatic.

    I’m probably one of the most hyper-sensitive people in this city (perhaps in this country, for that matter–seriously…), but I’ve never felt attacked by anyone on this site (and I was on here for more than a year before I ever met any of the people in this crclejrk…).

    What I’ve seen is that most of the regular CU posters present intelligent, well thought-out arguments and have a keen sense for identifying trolls and rabble-rousers who are just looking to stir the pot.

    I think it’s *very* rare that “innocent” posters get jumped on or voted off the island.

    #385958

    jackoh
    Participant

    L.I. to Buckeye wrote >>
    I’ve never felt attacked by anyone on this site
    I think it’s *very* rare that “innocent” posters get jumped on or voted off the island.

    A missreading of the point.

    #385959

    L.I. to Buckeye
    Participant

    jackoh wrote >>

    L.I. to Buckeye wrote >>

    I’ve never felt attacked by anyone on this site
    I think it’s *very* rare that “innocent” posters get jumped on or voted off the island.

    A missreading of the point.

    How is that?

    #385960

    jackoh
    Participant

    L.I. to Buckeye wrote >>

    jackoh wrote >>

    L.I. to Buckeye wrote >>

    I’ve never felt attacked by anyone on this site
    I think it’s *very* rare that “innocent” posters get jumped on or voted off the island.

    A missreading of the point.

    How is that?

    Golding is not fundamentally interested in the notion of someone being attacked or killed(the sensationalist aspect of his novel that gets lots of play but misses his point entirely). What he is attempting to lay bare is the dynamics of social organization. What he posits is that societies, whether they be nations or ad hoc groups of people, constitute themselves on the basis of some shared premise(which could be anything). And those sharing that premise, because they are invested in its existence, tend to defend it against anyone who would challenge it. This dosn’t mean killing or ostricising, it can mean as little as turning your back or not acknowledging the possiblity of a rational point. An example might be a Democrat who sees the need to be concerned about a mounting deficit or a Republican who sees the need to raise taxes to offset expenditures. The point is that societies, again large or small, tend to be insular groups that will not accept willingly, for good reason, those who would challenge the premises of their existence.

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