Our City Online

Messageboard - Art & Artists

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

Is Columbus Becoming A Music City?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Art & Artists Is Columbus Becoming A Music City?

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1029122

    joeyhendrickson
    Participant

    I’ve been researching this, and I want to find out what Columbus thinks:

    Is Columbus becoming a music city?

    #1029146
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Depends. What’s the definition of a Music City?

    #1029217

    joeyhendrickson
    Participant

    I’ll defer to the qualities that recognized “music cities” like Nashville, New York City, and Los Angeles, share in common:

    1) “large” or “fast growth” music economy
    2) organized, self-sustaining creative class
    3) directly connected to the music industry at large

    Do you think Columbus shares these qualities? Or, where do we lack?

    #1029230
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    We have the talent, and there are some good recording studios here. But we haven’t arrived yet in terms of being the kind of “music city” you mentioned.

    For one thing, I know the local record labels are struggling. By the time we did the second Invitational last year, half of the organizations we had included the first year had gone out of business.

    #1029246

    joeyhendrickson
    Participant

    Hi Chris: The invitational you mention above is neat. I wasn’t aware until now.

    Also, why do you think it is that these businesses went out so quickly? Lack of local support? Lack of integration with the local creative community? Lack of business acumen, in general?

    Thanks for your insights.

    #1029251

    dubdave00
    Participant

    1) “large” or “fast growth” music economy
    2) organized, self-sustaining creative class
    3) directly connected to the music industry at large

    Based on that definition, then no.

    I think the definition and expectations of a “music city” have shifted a lot in the past 20 years. For a long time, Columbus wanted to be the “next Seattle”. Then came Napster, iTunes, Pandora, and the death of the music industry. With artists now being discovered online, the democratization of music creation, and an entire world of music available in seconds, the days of celebrated, regionalized sounds are over. Scenes used to develop due to cultural isolation. Technology has eliminated that isolation and allows anyone around the world to easily recreate any sound. Look at dubstep. It arose in the UK, but it wasn’t long before it’s style was fused into pop, rock, country, and hiphop music. And the UK barely got any credit or attention for it, a former emo-rock kid in LA (Skrillex) did. :-)

    In addition, the music industry today is neither large nor fast-growing. What money remains is all in live performances and rights-holdings. In my mind, this makes Nashville and Austin “music cities” for their live performances and LA and NYC “music cities” simply because of corporate proximity and the benefits of being large cities.

    I think if Columbus wanted to become a “music city”, it would have to find a different sustainable niche that isn’t a sound style or a niche served by other communities. Perhaps more street musicians and street performances? Or maybe it’s some public music system that’s installed next to sidewalks across the city that only features local stuff? Or maybe it’s getting bands and video creatives together to make socially-conscious and sharable viral videos? Or maybe the city licenses the largest music library in the world and sets it free for residents online? I don’t know…

    I think it is business acumen, to a degree… You have to give people a reason to “shop local” for music.

    #1029289

    goldenidea
    Participant

    In addition, the music industry today is neither large nor fast-growing. What money remains is all in live performances and rights-holdings. In my mind, this makes Nashville and Austin “music cities” for their live performances

    I’m thinking out loud here… So are you saying the business side of music is stagnant and no longer large? Surely, fan numbers and level of interest in music hasn’t waned, but apparently there’s fewer ways to monetize that interest.

    I have a hard time understanding how anyone but mega-pop stars can make much money in music anymore. Do today’s emerging, successful bands, here in Columbus or elsewhere grow their financial income almost solely on live performance bookings? That seems like a tough way to grow your business, because it’s not very scalable and there’s no way to easily distribute live events. How much revenue comes from any kind of on-line sales? Apparently on-line exposure at best drives attendance at live performances?

    If the above is accurate, perhaps you can you measure the rate of growth and level of live performance revenue and on-line activity? If so, comparing the values for those metrics in Columbus to proven contenders elsewhere might indicate if we’re a music city.

    #1029291
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    Hi Chris: The invitational you mention above is neat. I wasn’t aware until now.

    Thanks! Be sure to come out and see our shows.

    Also, why do you think it is that these businesses went out so quickly? Lack of local support? Lack of integration with the local creative community? Lack of business acumen, in general?

    Thanks for your insights.

    I think it just comes down to it being a tough business. In terms of longevity and success, it seems like Old 3C and WeWantAction are the main labels still making a go of it here –and even those guys have “day jobs”.

    Some of the other labels had good artists and reputations, but I think it just became too much of a struggle to keep things going in terms of time and money.

    #1029476

    dubdave00
    Participant

    I’m thinking out loud here… So are you saying the business side of music is stagnant and no longer large? Surely, fan numbers and level of interest in music hasn’t waned, but apparently there’s fewer ways to monetize that interest.

    There’s still a sizable music industry, but it pales in comparison to what existed in say 1999.

    The business model has changed dramatically. Those $18 CDs, like them or not, did prop up an entire an industry. You can’t replace $18 albums with $1.29 singles or even Spotify / Pandora “royalties” and keep things the way they were. The money has shifted from recording sales to rights / licensing (Usually corporations and rich people) or performances, which as you pointed out, is tough to sustain.

    This is a really great read on the music industry when it comes to the business side of things.

    #1030318

    joeyhendrickson
    Participant

    Then came Napster, iTunes, Pandora, and the death of the music industry. With artists now being discovered online… an entire world of music available in seconds, the days of celebrated, regionalized sounds are over. Scenes used to develop due to cultural isolation. Technology has eliminated that isolation and allows anyone around the world to easily recreate any sound.

    DubDave: I want to paint a different picture for you. After meeting with experts in Los Angeles in Chicago for the last two years, including Arthouse Entertainment, Music Dealers, Sony BMG Chrysalis, SESAC Los Angeles, and several successful producers and composers, it occurred to me that the music industry is not faced with an inevitable death. Instead, the traditional models (ie. record labels, etc.) are struggling, while the untraditionalists are thriving.

    Based on what I learned, I believe you’re exactly right about performance and rights management becoming leading economic factors. The untraditionalists are positioning their pursuits around music licensing. But they have what Columbus doesn’t have: A music licensing and publishing culture in their backyard.

    Nevertheless, Columbus has technology on our side. A music city must be able to attract and retain its creative culture. The Rise of The Creative Class is a social science read that shows how cities with innovative tech culture, do retain their creative culture. In Columbus, wouldn’t it be interesting if our tech prowess led to innovations that fit the needs of the untraditionalists? I think music technology could propel our city forward.

    So I developed an event to get some music industry experts and city leaders to discuss this how Columbus could emerge as a music city. The event is called “How To Build A Music City” and will be held on August 30th. It will likely be an invite-only event. If interested in attending, block that day on your calendar. I’ll announce more details soon.

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #1082476

    News
    Participant

    New Commission Proposed to Take Columbus Music to the National Stage
    June 25, 2015 1:16 pm – Walker Evans

    Many locals would agree that Columbus has a vibrant and exciting music scene. But Columbus is still a far cry from the Nashvilles, New Yorks and Seattles of the world. Thankfully, a local initiative called “How to Build A Music City” is working to change that. The group hosted its first event last August, gathering music industry experts to solicit advice on how Columbus can take the local music scene to the next level.

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/new-commission-proposed-to-take-columbus-music-to-the-national-stage

    #1083010

    enigmaco
    Participant

    If you mean anything other than rap and hip hop than yes. But if you want to add those generes in than hell no.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)

The forum ‘Art & Artists’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Local journalism is more important than ever. Please take a moment to read a bit about our mission and consider financially supporting our cause.

CLICK HERE