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iPhone 5c and 5s announced

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion iPhone 5c and 5s announced

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  • #98708

    RedStorm
    Participant

    http://news.yahoo.com/apple-event-live–new-iphone-expected–come-chat-and-follow-as-it-happen–173848734.html

    Announcement on the 5s currently ongoing. 16GB 5C available for $99 with contract.

    #550939
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Interesting move to go cheaper. I’m not ready to trade in my 4s yet. Haven’t seen anything compelling enough to get me to make the upgrade.

    #550940

    futureman
    Participant

    Surprised the iPhone 5C costs this much. Unsubsidized, the 16gb is $549 which is only a $100 less than the 5S. Seems like it’s just the iPhone 5, but now covered in plastic.

    #550941

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    this is 100% sound advice from a security standpoint

    http://apple.slashdot.org/story/13/09/15/1222208/german-data-protection-expert-warns-against-using-iphone5s-fingerprint-function?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed

    German Data Protection Expert Warns Against Using iPhone5S Fingerprint Function

    “The biometric features of your body, like your fingerprints, cannot be erased or deleted. They stay with you until the end of your life and stay constant — they cannot be changed. One should thus avoid using biometric ID technologies for non-vital or casual everyday uses like turning on a smartphone. This is especially true if a biometric ID, like your fingerprint, is stored in a data file on the electronic device you are using.”

    (link goes to /. summary article with link to the original)

    Essentially it comes down to a similar problem as duplication of passwords. If you end up using bimetrics for something important later (and you probably will, with the way things are going) it is best that information not be duplicated in a wildly insecure theft target.

    #550942

    anillo
    Participant

    There are a lot of comments on that article that argue against what the German guy said, fwiw.

    #550943

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    anillo said:
    There are a lot of comments on that article that argue against what the German guy said, fwiw.

    of course there are. It’s an opinion piece, and there are no lack of opinions on the internet. Of course that includes comments/review being paid to support/denounce a product. This entire piece might be one of the later, but I don’t think so because it’s based on long standing general theory.

    What it comes down to is the importance placed on biometric markers, which opinion will vary from person to person and whether or not they feel the risk is worth the marginal (unproven) improvement in device security. That’s something people SHOULD consider for themselves for every use of biometrics (which was the point of the article, actually).

    there are three options, really.

    Some individuals will feel that it’s not that important to protect their biometric markers. End of story.

    Some will think it’s important, but they may decide they absolutely trust applecorp not to allow applications access to the data stored in the phone and trust them to never transmit this data, AND trust that the method actually is an improvement in security (we have no details here and there have been examples of badly flawed implementations of biomarker security systems), AND trust that hackers will never gain access to their phone, AND that at no point in the future the phone will be stolen and that information added to the already existent market for stolen information.

    Or, one can decide that this is at best a marginal improvement that is simply not actually proven to be worth the risk. A fingerprint is not like a password. It cannot be changed, it is yours until you die. Also every fingerprint system you use will have the same “passwords” (limit of 10 and some will limit to 6, thumbs and pinkies excluded, some require all 5, etc). It’s been said for years that one should not use duplicate authentications across multiple systems. An argument is made to save this method for something urgent: Banking, medical records, physical building access, etc.

    In the end it is up to the end user to make a decision, and decisions are best made after considering all the available information.

    #550944

    myliftkk
    Participant

    Fingertip transplant surgery or mummified fingers.

    I’d be more concerned we’d see a rash a finger severings than people stealing the data file.

    “I’ll take that phone, and your finger!”

    #550945
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    I’m young enough to know better but too old to care.

    #550946

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    myliftkk said:
    Fingertip transplant surgery or mummified fingers.

    I’d be more concerned we’d see a rash a finger severings than people stealing the data file.

    “I’ll take that phone, and your finger!”

    I hadn’t even considered someone might think of taking a finger to steal a phone. If someone has physical access to the device there will always be a way around needing that to do something simple like resell the phone. But that’s a pretty grim suggestion.

    #550947

    myliftkk
    Participant

    Rockmastermike said:
    I hadn’t even considered someone might think of taking a finger to steal a phone. If someone has physical access to the device there will always be a way around needing that to do something simple like resell the phone. But that’s a pretty grim suggestion.

    Lol, you have to think more like a criminal, not someone who studied so much science and technology.

    Shortest path to target…

    #550948

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    Rockmastermike said:
    I hadn’t even considered someone might think of taking a finger to steal a phone. If someone has physical access to the device there will always be a way around needing that to do something simple like resell the phone. But that’s a pretty grim suggestion.

    Or slice off the fingerprint and glue it to an eraser like Van Damme did in Double Team.

    #550949

    RedStorm
    Participant

    Snarf said:
    I’m young enough to know better but too old to care.

    “He’s old enough to know what’s right
    But young enough not to choose it” – Name that band.

    I have heard that the fingerprint technology is heat-based as well, so dead fingers won’t unlock a phone.

    #550950

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    RedStorm said:
    “He’s old enough to know what’s right
    But young enough not to choose it” – Name that band.

    I have heard that the fingerprint technology is heat-based as well, so dead fingers won’t unlock a phone.

    I think they’re confusing infared with ‘heat’. Even if it was the case, just keep your collection of stolen dead fingers in your pocket to keep ’em warm.

    and that was Rush

    #550951

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    well.. that didn’t take long

    Chaos Computer Club breaks Apple TouchID

    We’ll see if others duplicate this work. There’s a how-to and a video documenting the process (using a printer and some wood-glue LOL). We’ll see what develops.

    And an interesting philosophical point…

    “We hope that this finally puts to rest the illusions people have about fingerprint biometrics. It is plain stupid to use something that you can´t change and that you leave everywhere every day as a security token”, said Frank Rieger, spokesperson of the CCC. “The public should no longer be fooled by the biometrics industry with false security claims. Biometrics is fundamentally a technology designed for oppression and control, not for securing everyday device access.” Fingerprint biometrics in passports has been introduced in many countries despite the fact that by this global roll-out no security gain can be shown.

    iPhone users should avoid protecting sensitive data with their precious biometric fingerprint not only because it can be easily faked, as demonstrated by the CCC team. Also, you can easily be forced to unlock your phone against your will when being arrested. Forcing you to give up your (hopefully long) passcode is much harder under most jurisdictions than just casually swiping your phone over your handcuffed hands.

    #550952
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    As a casual observer I guess I never considered the fingerprint thing to be the end all be all of phone security but rather a gimmick.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 39 total)

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