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Interesting Graphic on Columbus & Indy Tourism

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Travel Interesting Graphic on Columbus & Indy Tourism

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 44 total)
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  • #346092

    KSquared
    Member

    alexs wrote >>
    The Scioto River is the nose on this city’s face. I’m working on changing the way this city relates to it. Fortunately FOSR is not alone in these efforts, but we’re fighting old perceptions and practices.

    FOSR does great work, thanks for everything your group does and is trying to do. I can imagine it’s not easy.

    #346093

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    KSquared wrote >>

    alexs wrote >>
    The Scioto River is the nose on this city’s face. I’m working on changing the way this city relates to it. Fortunately FOSR is not alone in these efforts, but we’re fighting old perceptions and practices.

    FOSR does great work, thanks for everything your group does and is trying to do. I can imagine it’s not easy.

    Thanks, the most difficult thing to deal with is this city’s tendency to disparage itself. The river is a sewer, the neighborhoods have gone to hell, the parks are full of perverts, the government is useless, blah blah blah.

    It’s strange to run a group for the Scioto because it’s neglected like the downtown that everyone leaves at the end of the workday. There are localized groups for the Olentangy, and Alum Creek and other streams, even neighborhood ravines and parks, but the Scioto is this big thing off in the distance, that belongs to no one.

    Well, there’s the Scioto Mile, that’s an improvement. There’s the new Audubon center, and looking farther back there’s North Bank Park. But look across the river at Greenlawn and there’s a forgotten dump along Scioto Blvd with a panoramic view of the river and downtown, behind a half-hearted concrete barrier that you can actually drive a truck through. I asked the parks planner about the status of the area and she referred me to someone in Facilities and Real Estate.

    Meanwhile Dublin celebrates its river parks with the riverboxes project. They’re trying to draw people to the parks they have invested in creating. It’s a major selling point for the quality of life in that community. Why is there nothing like that in Columbus?

    #346094

    michaelcoyote
    Participant

    agtw31 wrote >>

    drew wrote >>

    Also suspect that there are far more people living within, say, a 60 mile radius of Columbus.

    if they are 60 miles south or north,they are going to Cleveland or Cinci.

    Not especially. I grew up north of Mount Vernon, and we never went to Cleveland, Akron or Canton for shopping or field trips. Occasionally we’d go to Wooster or Mansfield, but pretty much it was always Columbus.

    If it hadn’t been for WJW and Big Chuck and Houlihan (later Little John), I probably wouldn’t have ever heard Cleveland mentioned in my house.

    #346095

    ehill27
    Participant

    alexs wrote >>

    Thanks, the most difficult thing to deal with is this city’s tendency to disparage itself. The river is a sewer… blah blah blah.

    This seems to have been directed at me, so I’d like to start by saying that North Bank Park is one of my favorite places in C-Bus. Looking over the river toward downtown is an awesome thing for me, very peaceful, very relaxing and fills me civic pride.

    However, every time I’m there, I can’t help but wish the water was cleaner and that I didn’t have to look at a large storm sewer overflow pipe that warns people to stay out of the toxic water. I couldn’t agree with you more that we need to embrace the river, but isn’t acknowledging the problem the first step toward a solution.

    #346096

    agtw31
    Member

    michaelcoyote wrote >>

    I grew up north of Mount Vernon.

    a lot of my neighbors are actually from the Gambier area.

    #346097

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    ehill27 wrote >>

    alexs wrote >>

    Thanks, the most difficult thing to deal with is this city’s tendency to disparage itself. The river is a sewer… blah blah blah.

    This seems to have been directed at me

    Not taking a shot at you but at the way this city sells itself short.

    Finding solutions is an open opportunity. For example, those overflows, why do they happen? Because we send our rainwater into the same sewers that handle our sanitary waste, and when it’s too much it gets dumped straight into the rivers.

    How do we fix that? Keep the rainwater and let it soak in instead of trying to hustle it all off as quickly as possible. Google “green streets” for more.

    I’ve said in other threads, I try to frame this environmentalism in a business case: We are in competition with Indianapolis and many other cities, and when potential residents/businesses look at us, they take into consideration our parks and green space in general.

    #346098
    alove
    alove
    Participant

    alexs wrote >>

    ehill27 wrote >>

    alexs wrote >>

    Thanks, the most difficult thing to deal with is this city’s tendency to disparage itself. The river is a sewer… blah blah blah.

    This seems to have been directed at me

    Not taking a shot at you but at the way this city sells itself short.
    Finding solutions is an open opportunity. For example, those overflows, why do they happen? Because we send our rainwater into the same sewers that handle our sanitary waste, and when it’s too much it gets dumped straight into the rivers.
    How do we fix that? Keep the rainwater and let it soak in instead of trying to hustle it all off as quickly as possible. Google “green streets” for more.
    I’ve said in other threads, I try to frame this environmentalism in a business case: We are in competition with Indianapolis and many other cities, and when potential residents/businesses look at us, they take into consideration our parks and green space in general.

    more green space, more green roofs

    #346099

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    One of my notes from a webcast: “Turn gray funnels into green sponges.”

    #346100

    The NCAA Museum suuuuuuuuuuuucks. It is incredibly boring. I think we spent an hour playing H.O.R.S.E. in the museum just to make the entry fee worth it.

    #346101

    Lt. Sanders
    Member

    I’ve lived in several major cities, and Columbus is just so bland. I currently live and work in Columbus and the only personality Columbus and Central Ohio has is Ohio State. Which beyond Central Ohio, people just don’t seem to care about. I know I certainly don’t. People go to work in Columbus and seem to get out of there as fast as they can when it’s over. Theatre, blah, German Village, blah, festivals, blah. I wouldn’t even consider going to the downtown festivals because of the parking and crime.

    Most people I talk to don’t even consider Columbus to be a major city. Just a speed bump between Cleveland and Cinci. The CVB has some major work cut out for it.

    #346102

    ehill27
    Participant

    @Lt. Sanders – I hope you are able to leave the city soon.

    #346103

    Lt. Sanders
    Member

    I’m just giving you an honest opinion based upon personal experience. Get outside C-bus and you might find my opinion is not that far fetched.

    #346104

    JonMyers
    Participant

    I dunno Colonel, Cincinnati has some of the trappings of a big city like pro sports, but I find it to be pretty hick and otherwise small town in mentality in contrast with Columbus.

    I’d claw my eyes out if I had to live there.

    #346105

    Lt. Sanders
    Member

    I’m not being a proponent of Cinci, but I know what you mean about the mentality there. I think the hick/small town thing comes from it’s conservatism and fear of change.

    I’m just saying that Columbus has a lot of negative perception outside it’s borders that maybe it’s not aware of. A lot of people also have no perception of Columbus. People ask if it’s around Cinci or Cleveland, they know nothing about it.

    #346106

    arenn
    Participant

    By the way, that photograph of the water in Indianapolis is a canal, not the White River.

    I think parks and green space are over rated. Places like Columbus and Indy need more urban development and energy, not more open space.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 44 total)

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