Messageboard - Transportation

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

Infographic: The Benefits of Public Transportation

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Infographic: The Benefits of Public Transportation

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 38 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #506014
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    geoyui said:
    Quite a bit of discussion over one word in that giant infographic.

    You surprised? The light rail thread hit 18 pages in what, two days? Lot of raw emotion on this topic, apparently.

    #506015

    geoyui
    Participant

    rus said:
    You surprised? The light rail thread hit 18 pages in what, two days? Lot of raw emotion on this topic, apparently.

    Don’t get me started on light rail …

    #506016

    Twixlen
    Participant

    On the errands/tasks/whatnot — a pal of mine just moved back to the states from London – outskirts, actually. She now lives in a small town, and when we were talking about her time overseas, she said she really missed the quality of life where she could walk to the store, take the train/bus/walk/endless-combination-of-transit-options to do what needed to be done. The way her particular train station worked is it was attached to a market – you literally walked through it to get to the station. So, on the way home, she could grab a quick thing or two to make dinner that night.

    I would love that.

    #506017

    lifeontwowheels
    Participant

    Twixlen said:
    On the errands/tasks/whatnot — a pal of mine just moved back to the states from London – outskirts, actually. She now lives in a small town, and when we were talking about her time overseas, she said she really missed the quality of life where she could walk to the store, take the train/bus/walk/endless-combination-of-transit-options to do what needed to be done. The way her particular train station worked is it was attached to a market – you literally walked through it to get to the station. So, on the way home, she could grab a quick thing or two to make dinner that night.

    I would love that.

    Yeah but it doesn’t work for some people so that means none of us can have it.

    #506018

    cheap
    Member

    COTA is missing out on a large demographic by not having these

    #506019
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Twixlen said:
    On the errands/tasks/whatnot — a pal of mine just moved back to the states from London – outskirts, actually. She now lives in a small town, and when we were talking about her time overseas, she said she really missed the quality of life where she could walk to the store, take the train/bus/walk/endless-combination-of-transit-options to do what needed to be done. The way her particular train station worked is it was attached to a market – you literally walked through it to get to the station. So, on the way home, she could grab a quick thing or two to make dinner that night.

    I would love that.

    http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2012/05/secret-tokyos-rail-success/2044/

    Would you buy produce from the COTA mall?

    #506020

    Twixlen
    Participant

    rus said:
    http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2012/05/secret-tokyos-rail-success/2044/

    Would you buy produce from the COTA mall?

    Yup – why not?

    #506021

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    ^Duh, the government isn’t even capable of selling produce.

    #506022
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Twixlen said:
    Yup – why not?

    Seems like it would be a bit of a change to a permit public sector agency to get into the retail business. They’d be competing directly with private sector grocers, community markets, and other entities based on the goods they sold.

    That really what you want?

    #506023

    geoyui
    Participant

    rus said:
    Seems like it would be a bit of a change to a permit public sector agency to get into the retail business. They’d be competing directly with private sector grocers, community markets, and other entities based on the goods they sold.

    That really what you want?

    CMH is run by the port authority, and yet has retail and food available. The gov’t doesn’t control the products sold, it would just provide space to use. And Twixlen said that the grocery was attached to the station, nothing about a gov’t run grocer.

    #506024
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    geoyui said:
    CMH is run by the port authority, and yet has retail and food available. The gov’t doesn’t control the products sold, it would just provide space to use. And Twixlen said that the grocery was attached to the station, nothing about a gov’t run grocer.

    Check the atlanticcities link I posted for reference; in Tokyo rail development expanded into retail. The train was almost an afterthought. More than just providing space, the developers created destinations most easily accessible via rail lines they also built.

    Trying to translate that locally would seem to expand COTAs mandate significantly. At the very least, using your CMH example, COTA would build out in effect small shopping malls with limited or no parking for cars or bikes in which they’re rent out space to tenants.

    #506025

    peanutnozone
    Participant

    Check the atlanticcities link I posted for reference; in Tokyo rail development expanded into retail. The train was almost an afterthought. More than just providing space, the developers created destinations most easily accessible via rail lines they also built.

    I thought this was part of the point? I think that would be great, in fact, I live it as far as having markets and or retail directly on or immediately adjacent to metro stations here in B’more and DC. I also wanna say at Shaker Square on the RTA green line or blue line there is a diner directly on station real estate.

    Why is that bad, exactly?

    #506026
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    peanutnozone said:

    Why is that bad, exactly?

    Bad is relative; at the least, you’d agree that it would be a significant change in COTA’s mandate? Something the wider public would have to support, as in fund, and perhaps you can see how private developers might resist such an expansion.

    #506027

    pedex
    Participant

    rus said:
    Bad is relative; at the least, you’d agree that it would be a significant change in COTA’s mandate? Something the wider public would have to support, as in fund, and perhaps you can see how private developers might resist such an expansion.

    you assume COTA would be in the commercial RE business, doesn’t have to be the case at all

    we already have transit and convention center authorities renting out space for commercial purposes w/o problems to begin with

    #506028
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    rus said:
    Bad is relative; at the least, you’d agree that it would be a significant change in COTA’s mandate? Something the wider public would have to support, as in fund, and perhaps you can see how private developers might resist such an expansion.

    Unless the retail side was owned/operated by some other entity. If a rail station were placed somewhere adjacent to the Convention Center (it’s got enough tracks around it) I imagine it would be feasible that COTA could run the train operations while the Franklin County Convention Facilities Authority (FCCFA) could run the retail portions of the station, just like they do the retail inside the Convention Center itself. Probably a number of public/private combinations for making something like that work that doesn’t involve putting COTA in charge of the retail side.

    Edit: Looks like pedex beat me to the same thought by 2 minutes. ;)

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 38 total)

The forum ‘Transportation’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Subscribe below: