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Infographic: The Benefits of Public Transportation

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Infographic: The Benefits of Public Transportation

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  • #92837
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster
    #506000

    MRipley
    Participant

    Guess it would be interesting to hear/read how they fiqure that “people riding the rails get more errands out of the way en route?”

    errand
    Definition
    er·rand[ érrənd ]er·rands Plural

    NOUN
    1. short trip for somebody else’s benefit: a short trip somewhere to do something on behalf of somebody else, e.g. to buy something or deliver a message
    “She sometimes runs errands for me if I’m not well enough to go out.”
    2. task undertaken for somebody else: a task that somebody goes somewhere to carry out for somebody else
    [ Old English ǣrende “message, mission” < ? ]

    #506001
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    MRipley said:
    Guess it would be interesting to hear/read how they fiqure that “people riding the rails get more errands out of the way en route?”

    My assumption would be that they’re saying that a transit rider is more likely to consolidate errands into a single trip than someone commuting by car.

    #506002

    MRipley
    Participant

    Walker said:
    My assumption would be that they’re saying that a transit rider is more likely to consolidate errands into a single trip than someone commuting by car.

    Oh. Still don’t see where combining errands via train requiring multiple boarding and unboarding, waiting on a specific time schedule, getting from a train station to your multiple destinations (taking a cab, walking in the rain/snow, heat) lugging grocery bags, dry cleaning, and a broken toaster oven while taking the kids to the dentist on a potentially crowded public rail car makes life “simpler” than throwing the stuff (including kids) into your automobile and run your errands directly to the front door of each stop.

    My assumption is that proponents will claim just about anything to justify their objective, reasonable or not.

    #506003

    bucki12
    Member

    I am guessing they meant ‘tasks’ instead of ‘errands’ which might include reading, making business calls, checking email, etc – all of which are frowned upon when in control of a vehicle.

    I could be wrong, but I think this is more a sloppy, incorrect word choice.

    #506004

    lifeontwowheels
    Participant

    MRipley said:
    Oh. Still don’t see where combining errands via train requiring multiple boarding and unboarding, waiting on a specific time schedule, getting from a train station to your multiple destinations (taking a cab, walking in the rain/snow, heat) lugging grocery bags, dry cleaning, and a broken toaster oven while taking the kids to the dentist on a potentially crowded public rail car makes life “simpler” than throwing the stuff (including kids) into your automobile and run your errands directly to the front door of each stop.

    My assumption is that proponents will claim just about anything to justify their objective, reasonable or not.

    Except that it is reasonable for some. It may not be reasonable for you personally but that doesn’t make it a valid reason to not consider building out alternatives.

    #506005

    DTown
    Participant

    MRipley said:
    Oh. Still don’t see where combining errands via train requiring multiple boarding and unboarding, waiting on a specific time schedule, getting from a train station to your multiple destinations (taking a cab, walking in the rain/snow, heat) lugging grocery bags, dry cleaning, and a broken toaster oven while taking the kids to the dentist on a potentially crowded public rail car makes life “simpler” than throwing the stuff (including kids) into your automobile and run your errands directly to the front door of each stop.

    My assumption is that proponents will claim just about anything to justify their objective, reasonable or not.

    They are also likely talking about cities with fully built out urban infrastructure along with the mass transit system. When I’ve been in Toronto, for instance, I’ve found it extremely easy to do errands, since the stores and shops that I needed were virtually adjacent to the stops, and I would walk right by them twice a day. Plus, lots of those shops were open early, so I could, say, drop off dry cleaning on my way out just as easily as picking it up on the way home.

    As opposed to having to drive to a few different strip malls, or a large grocery store that is not directly on my way to/from the office.

    I don’t think it’s propaganda, and agreed it doesn’t apply to current day Columbus, but it may just be assuming more than some people are familiar with.

    #506006
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    MRipley said:
    Oh. Still don’t see…

    Well of couse you don’t see it with that crazy outlandish example.

    Can I provide a different one?

    If I’m at work Downtown and I need to go to the grocery store for a non-urgent item and I have my car handy, I’m probably just as likely to drive home first and change clothes, eat dinner, watch tv, relax and go to Kroger later.

    But if I’m busing it, I’m more likely going to walk over to CVS a block away after work, pick up that grocery item and take it home with me on the bus from there so that I don’t have to make another trip out on the bus later on.

    It’s a fairly small day-to-day detail, but added up across multiple days, multiple trips and multiple people, it can add up.

    Again, I’m just assuming that this is the type of thing meant by that original comment in the infographic. Perhaps I’m wrong and they’re talking about something else. Either way, I’m totally open to discussing further with you if you’re willing to talk about this like a rational adult.

    #506007
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    DTown said:
    I don’t think it’s propaganda, and agreed it doesn’t apply to current day Columbus,

    I think that’s key; given the current environment here it’s hard to see how it could work. Obviously some would like to change the environment here to support such a system ( greater density and all ) but I wonder what we’d lose from such changes.

    #506008
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    bucki12 said:
    I am guessing they meant ‘tasks’ instead of ‘errands’ which might include reading, making business calls, checking email, etc – all of which are frowned upon when in control of a vehicle.

    That’s probably more likely what is meant since it says “en route”.

    #506009
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    rus said:
    I wonder what we’d lose from such changes.

    Our city’s collective inferiority complex?

    #506010

    DTown
    Participant

    rus said:
    I think that’s key; given the current environment here it’s hard to see how it could work. Obviously some would like to change the environment here to support such a system ( greater density and all ) but I wonder what we’d lose from such changes.

    Well, you cut out a bit of my point there, but, I don’t think that a modern, high functioning mass transit system requires maximum density to be viable, so I don’t think progress means we would have to lose that small town charm that people seem so fond of.

    #506011
    Josh Lapp
    Josh Lapp
    Participant

    Walker said:
    Well of couse you don’t see it with that crazy outlandish example.

    Can I provide a different one?

    If I’m at work Downtown and I need to go to the grocery store for a non-urgent item and I have my car handy, I’m probably just as likely to drive home first and change clothes, eat dinner, watch tv, relax and go to Kroger later.

    But if I’m busing it, I’m more likely going to walk over to CVS a block away after work, pick up that grocery item and take it home with me on the bus from there so that I don’t have to make another trip out on the bus later on.

    It’s a fairly small day-to-day detail, but added up across multiple days, multiple trips and multiple people, it can add up.

    Again, I’m just assuming that this is the type of thing meant by that original comment in the infographic. Perhaps I’m wrong and they’re talking about something else. Either way, I’m totally open to discussing further with you if you’re willing to talk about this like a rational adult.

    I find it to be extremely true of my situation when riding the bus. I typically will combine all my shopping and errands into one stop then head home. I know the same is not always true when I drive my car.

    #506012
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    DTown said:
    Well, you cut out a bit of my point there, but, I don’t think that a modern, high functioning mass transit system requires maximum density to be viable, so I don’t think progress means we would have to lose that small town charm that people seem so fond of.

    I was focusing on that specifically.

    That said, when I lived without a car it was common to try to combine trips although for some things it did take either an extra trip or settling for something else / doing without.

    #506013

    geoyui
    Participant

    Quite a bit of discussion over one word in that giant infographic.

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